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PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING 



OF THE 



North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association 



GRADED SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 
NEW BERN, N. C, 
JUNE EI 11fk 17tK 13th,BBI 1913 

ALSO THE 

ROLL OF MEMBERS, WITH LIST OF 
REGISTERED PHARMACISTS 



The Seeman Printery 

Durham, N. C. 

1913 



PREFATORY NOTES 



For general information regarding the Association, or for blank 
applications for membership, write to the Secretary, J. G. Beard, 
Chapel Hill. 

In case of the death of a member coming to your notice, advise 
the Secretary, giving such particulars as may be desirable to publish. 

If you find your name omitted or incorrectly spelled, or your address 
erroneously given, notify the Secretary at once, giving your full 
name and address. 

For information concerning examinations, the State Pharmacy Law 
and its enforcement, and Certificates of Registration, address F. W. 
Hancock, Secretary Board of Pharmacy, Oxford. 

Take notice of the advertisers who have liberally responded to re- 
quests for advertisements, mentioning the Proceedings in your cor- 
respondence with them. You can render no better service to the As- 
sociation. 



THE NEXT MEETING OF THE NORTH CARO- 
LINA PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION WILL BE 
HELD IX HEXDERSOXYILLE, NORTH CAROLINA, 

ON THE 17-18-19 JUNE, 1911. 



Library, Univ. of 
North Carolina 

OFFICERS, COMMITTEES AND DELEGATES 
1913-1914 

OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 

C. P. HARPER Selma 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

G. C. GOODMAN Mooresville 

E. L. TARKINGi OX Wilson 

E. G. BIRDSOXG Raleigh 

SECRETARY 

J. G BEARD Chapel Hill 

TREASURER 

G. E. BURWELL Charlotte 

REPORTER ON PROGRESS OF PHARMACY 

E V. HOWELL Chapel Hill 

LOCAL SECRETARY 

W. H. JUSTUS Hendersonville 

MEMBERS BOARD OF PHARMACY 

E. V. ZOELLER Tarboro 

I. W. ROSE Rocky Mount 

W. W. HORNE Fayetteville 

J. P. STOWE Charlotte 

F. W .HANCOCK, Secretary and Treasurer Oxford 

COMMITTEES 

LEGISLATIVE 

F. W. HANCOCK Oxford 

E. V. ZOELLER Tarboro 

W. W. HORNE Fayetteville 

I. W. ROSE Rocky Mount 

J. P. STOWE Charlotte 



■i North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



AUXILIARY TO ABOVE 

E. G. BIRDSONG Raleigh 

RAWLEIGH GALLOWAY Raleigh 

C. B. MILLER : Goldsboro 

ADULTERATIONS 

R. H. ROTH Asheville 

J. E. SHELL Lenoir 

E. W. O'HANLON Winston-Salem 

PAPERS AND QUERIES 

E. V. HOWELL Chapel Hill 

C. P. GREYER Morganton 

R. A. TURLINGTON Wilson 

GRANTHAM RESOLUTION FOR MEMBERSHIP INCREASE 

C. D. SEDBERRY Fayetteville 

P. W. VAUGHAN Durham 

G. E. BURWELL Charlotte 



DELEGATES 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

E. Y. ZOELLER Tarboro 

E. V. HOWELL Chapel Hill 

C. P. GREYER Morganton 

TENNESSEE ASSOCIATION 

T. G. BEARD Chapel Hill 

T. R. HOOD Smithfield 

K. E. BENNETT Bryson City 

MEDICAL SOCIETY 

W. M. YEARBY Durham 

FRANK S. SMITH Asheville 

W. H. JUSTUS Hendersonville 

SOUTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION 

W. M. COOK Salisbury 

W. C. CARMICHAEL Asheville 

S. E. WELFARE Winston-Salem 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 5 

VIRGINIA ASSOCIATION 

H. S. OVERMAN Elizabeth City 

G. W. WATSON Southport 

E. T. WHITEHEAD Scotland Neck 

MARYLAND ASSOCIATION 

JOHN SPRAGUE Raleigh 

W. H. WEARN Charlotte 

P. A. LEE Dunn 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION 



PRESIDENTS 



V. 


o. 


11. 


R. 


A. 


W. 


F. 


w. 


T. 


D. 


J. 


D. 


E. 


V. 


w 


. H 



E. M. Nadal Wilson 1880-1881 

S. J. Hinsdale Fayetteville 1881-1882 

William Simpson Raleigh 1882-1883 

W. H. Green Wilmington 1883-1884 

Thompson Winston 1884-1885 

Home Fayetteville 1885-1886 

. lowland Wilson 1886-1887 

, Hancock New Bern 1887-1888 

Crawford Oxford 1888-1889 

Croom Maxton 1889-1890 

Zoeller Tarboro 1890-1891 

[. Wearn Charlotte 1891-1892 

H. R. Chears Plymouth 1892-1893 

N. D. Fetzer Concord 1893-1894 

J. Hal Bobbitt Raleigh 1894-1895 

P. W. Vaughan Durham 1895-1896 

Augustus Bradley Burlington 1896-1897 

Stedman Oxford 1897-1898 

. Yearby Durham 1898-1899 

Smith Lexington 1899-1900 

Jordan Charlotte 1900-1901 

. O'Hanlon Winston-Salem 1901-1902 

Hicks Raleigh 1902-1903 

, Leslie Morganton 1903-1904 

Grantham Dunn 1904-1905 

Hood Smithfield 1905-1906 

Raysor Asheville 1906-1907 

R. Thomas Thomasville 1907-1808 

Shell Lenoir 1908-1909 

Watson Southport 1909-1910 

T. Payne Greensboro 1910-1911 

E. T. Whitehead Waynesville 1911-1912 

J. G. M. Cordon Clayton 1912-1913 

C. P. Harper Selma 1913-1914 



J. 


P. 


w 


, M 


J. 


B. 


R. 


H. 


E. 


W. 


H. 


T. 


W 


. A. 


G. 


K. 


T. 


R. 


C. 


A. 


Chas. 


J- 


E. 


G. 


Y. 


Max ' 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



FIRST VICE-PRESIDENTS 

S. J. Hinsdale Fayetteville 1880-1881 

William Simpson Raleigh 1881-1882 

E. H. Meadows New Bern 1882-1883 

John H. Hill Goldsboro 1883-1884 

H. R. Home Fayetteville 1884-1885 

A. W. Rowland Wilson 1885-1886 

F. W. Hancock New Bern 1886-1887 

T. D. Crawford Oxford 1887-1888 

J. D. Croom Maxton 1888-1889 

E. V. Zoeller Tarboro 1889-1890 

W. H. Wearn Charlotte 1890-1891 

H. R. Chears Plymouth 1891-1892 

N. D. Fetzer Concord 1892-1893 

J. Hal Bobbitt Raleigh 1893-1894 

P. W. Vaughan Durham 1894-1895 

Augustus Bradley Burlington 1895-1896 

J. P. Stedman Oxford 1896-1897 

W. M. Yearby Durham 1897-1898 

J. B. Smith Lexington 1898-1899 

R. H. Jordan Charlotte 1899-1900 

John H. Hardin Wilmington 1900-1901 

Henry T. Hicks Raleigh 1901-1902 

W. A. Leslie • Morganton 1902-1903 

G. K. Grantham Dunn 1903-1904 

T. R. Hood Smithfield 1904-1905 

C. A. Raysor Asheville 1905-1906 

C. R. Thomas Thomasville 1906-1907 

J. E. Shell Lenoir 1907-1908 

G. Y. Watson Southport 1908-1909 

I. W. Rose Rocky Mount 1909-1910 

G. A. Matton High Point 1910-1911 

J. G. M. Cordon Clayton 191 1-1912 

C. P. Harper Selma 1912-1813 

G. C. Goodman Mooresville 1913-1914 

SECOND VICE-PRESIDENTS 

William Simpson Raleigh 1880-1881 

E. H. Meadows New Bern 1881-1882 

V. O. Thompson Winston 1882-1883 

V. O. Thompson Winston 1883-1884 

A W. Rowland Wilson 1884-1885 

F. W. Hancock New Bern 1885-1886 

B. E. Sedberry Fayettevillle 1886-1887 



8 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

W. C. Carmichael Asheville 1887-1888 

L. Richardson Selma 1888-1889 

W. H. Wearn Charlotte 1889-1890 

H. R. Chears Plymouth 1890-1891 

N. D. Fetzer Concord 1891-1892 

J. Hal Bobbitt Raleigh 1892-1893 

P. W. Vaughan Durham 1893-1894 

Augustus Bradley Raleigh 1894-1895 

J. P. Stedman Oxford 1895-1896 

W. M. Yearby Durham 1896-1897 

J. B. Smith Lexington 1897-1898 

R. H. Jordan Charlotte 1898-1899 

E. W. O'Hanlon Winston 1899-1900 

H. T. Hicks Raleigh 1 900-1 901 

W. A. Leslie Morganton 1901-1902 

G. K. Grantham Dunn 1902-1903 

T. R. Hood Smithfield 1903-1904 

C. B. Miller Goldsboro 1904-1905 

C. R. Thomas Thomasville 1905-1906 

F. S. Duffy New Bern 1906-1907 

G. Y. Watson Southport 1907-1908 

C. E. King Durham 1908-1909 

Max T. Payne Greensboro 1909-1910 

J. P. Woodall Charlotte 1910-1911 

C. C. Fordham ! Greensboro 1911-1912 

R H Roth \sheville 1912-1913 

E. L. Tarkington Wilson 1913-1914 



THIRD VICE-PRESIDEXTS 



E. H. Meadows New Bern 

V. O. Thompson Winston . . 

T. C. Smith Charlotte . 

F. W. Hancock New Bern 

John Tull Morganton 

J. D. Croom Maxton . . 

W. H. Wearn Charlotte . 

H. C. Shannon Goldsboro 

P. W. Vaughan Durham . . 

N. D. Fetzer Concord . . 

B. E. Sedberry Fayetteville 

W. C. Thomas Louisburg 

Augustus Bradley Raleigh . . . 

R. L. Dixon Milton 

H. M. McDonald LaGrange . 



884- 



892- 
893- 
894- 

895- 



-1881 
•1882 
•1884 
1885 
-1886 
■1887 
■1888 
■1889 
•1890 
-1891 
■1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 9 

J. B. Smith Lexington 1896-1897 

J. I. Johnson Raleigh 1897-1898 

E. W. O'Hanlon Winston 1898-1899 

H. T. Hicks Raleigh 1899-1900 

W. A. Leslie Morganton 1900-1901 

G. K. Grantham Dunn 1901-1902 

T. R. Hood Smithfield 1 902-1903 

C. B. Miller Goldsboro 1903-1904 

C. R. Thomas Thomasville 1904-1905 

F. S. Duffy New Bern 1905-1906 

J. E Shell Lenoir 1906-1907 

W. H Justus Hendersonville 1907-1908 

I. W. Rose Benson 1908- 1909 

G. A. Matton High Point 1909-1910 

E. T. Whitehead Scotland Xeck 1910-191 1 

C. P. Harper Selma 1911-1912 

G. C. Goodman Mooresville 1912-1913 

E. G. Birdsong Raleigh 1913-1914 

SECRETARIES 

T. C. Smith Charlotte 1880-1882 

J. C. Munds Wilmington 1882-1887 

E. V. Zoeller Tarboro 1887-1890 

F. W. Hancock Oxford 1890-1894 

H. R. Home Fayetteville 1894-1899 

P. W. Vaughan Durham 1899-1912 

J. G. Beard Chapel Hill 1912-1914 

TREASURERS 

John S. Pescud Raleigh 1880-1882 

A. S. Lee Raleigh 1882-1891 

A. J. Cook Fayetteville 1901-1906 

G. K. Grantham Dunn 1906-1909 

G. E. Burwell Charlotte 1909-1914 

PLACES OF MEETING AND LOCAL SECRETARIES 

Raleigh, 1880 Orgnization Meeting 

New Bern, 1881 Business Committee 

Winston, 1882 S. H. Smith 

Wilmington, 1883 John D. Hardin 

Charlotte, 1884 L. R. Wriston 

Greensboro, 1885 R. G. Glenn 

Fayetteville, 1886 B. E. Sedberry 



10 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Asheville, 1887 W. C. Carmichael 

Goldsboro, 1888 H. C. Shannon 

Durham, 1889 P. W. Vaughan 

Morehead City, 1890 F. W. Hancock 

Morehead City, 1891 R. J. Gooding 

Raleigh, 1892 W. H. King 

Greensboro, 1893 F. A. Bobbitt 

Asheville, 1894 W. G Smith 

Morehead City, 1895 B. C. Jones 

Morehead City, 1896 CD. Bradham 

Raleigh, 1897 J. H. Bobbitt 

Charlotte, 1898 W. H. Wearn 

Durham, 1899 P. C. Sneed 

Wilmington, 1900 John H. Hardin 

Winston-Salem, 1901 E. W. O'Hanlon 

Morehead City, 1902 C. D. Bradham 

Morehead City, 1903 F. S. Duffy 

Asheville, 1904 W. C. Carmichael 

Morehead City, 1905 F. S. Duffy 

Wrightsville Beach, 1906 G. Y. Watson 

Lake Toxaway, 1907 F. D. Hunter 

Morehead City, 1908 D. R. Davis 

Greensboro, 1909 Max T. Payne 

Charlotte, 1910 J. P. Woodall 

Morehead City, 191 1 F. W. Hancock 

Waynesville, 1912 G. E. Burwell 

New Bern, 1913 C. D. Bradham 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING 



XeW BeKX. X. C. 

June 11, 12 and 13, 1913. 
Graded School Auditorium, 

10 :00 a. m. 
FIRST SESSION 

The Thirty-Four tli Annual Meeting of the Xorth Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association was called to order by Vice-Pres- 
ident C. P. Harper, of Selnia, in the absence of the President. 
Mr. Harper, said : 

"I am disappointed that the President is not here and I 
also regret his absence because it devolves upon me a duty 
for which I am not prepared. I am glad to see such a large 
body here this morning, and our visiting friends. I may 
make mistakes but if I do I want to assure you that it will be 
an error of judgment and not of the heart. I want to express 
the hope that you all will join us in making this the most 
useful and most enjoyable convention which the Xorth Caro- 
lina Druggists have ever held.'' 

Mr. C. D. Bradham of Xew Bern, then introduced Rev. 
B. F. Huske, who delivered the following invocation: 

"Our Almighty Father, we pray thee to be with this meet- 
ing, with the members of the Pharmaceutical Association of 
the State. We thank thee that they have been permitted to 
gather in our midst for the advancement of their pro- 
fession. We pray Thee to give to these Thy servants, the 
members of this Association, and those who are engaged in 
this noble work throughout the State the high sense of dignity 



12 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

of their profession. Make them to understand that largely 
the health of our citizenship depends upon their services. 
It is committed to the members of this Association to bring- 
to Thy people throughout the state the blest and most bene- 
ficial remedies that Thou hast stored nature with. 

"Help them to bring those things which are pure and 
strung so thai Thy people may be relieved of their pain. 
Grant that these men may have it committed to them in their 
work and their profession and be largely responsible of Thy 
people. .Make them to know that they are the guardians of 
the health of the people, so that Thy people may see that those 
i lii hi:- are intended for them. 

"We pray Thee to give to- these Thy servants true con- 
ceptions of the dignity of their work. Make them realize 
that they are Thy servants. We pray especially for those 
who are going out as newly licensed pharmacists, that they 
may make it a successful work and be faithful in their duties 
as the druggists of the commonwealth. Grant that they may 
think and devise those things that will make for the welfare 
of the world. Make us thankful that Thou hast permitted 
them to gather so that mutually working together they may 
advance their common interests. Help us to understand the 
good that comes from brotherhood. Make and prosper all 
the deliberations of this association, be with them, bless them 
and grant they may go away benefitted by the opportunity 
Thou hast given to them to meet in our midst. Grant they 
may be Thy servants, serving through the Glory of Thy name 
through Jesus Christ our Lord, Amen." 

Me. Bradham : 

I will introduce to you one of the original members of the 
Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association and a former 
Vice-President of vour Association, Mr. E. H. Meadows. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 13 

Address of Welcome by E. H. Meadows 

North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association: 

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen : Thirty-two years ago on 
the 9th of August next it was my pleasure, in behalf of the Pharma- 
cists of this good old city, rich in the memories of the past, replete in 
the achievments of its sons and daughters, to welcome you as an Asso- 
ciation struggling against prejudice, ignorance and petty jealousies 
to raise the standard of Pharmacy, and to regulate the practice thereof 
by legislative enactment. 

It is now a greater pleasure to welcome you to a modern City, 
equipped with all the up-to-date utilities in which the members of 
your honored profession have kept apace by a high order of intellectual 
equipment. 

Xot like the prodigal son have you returned, but laden with honors, 
and rich in accomplishments. 

You have by merit risen from a merchantile pursuit to a learned 
profession. 

You have now a legal status as an association. 

You have one of the most accomplished and able boards of Phar- 
macy, whose certificate of license are recognized throughout the 
United States, as medals for profiency in Pharmacy. Botany, Phar- 
maceutical, Chemistry, Therapeutics. Materia Medica. Toxicology, 
Hygenics, and Sanitation. 

The dear old University of North Carolina, the Alma Mater of 
many of the most distinguished men, whose efforts have adorned the 
history of the States, was first to recognize your work by having 
established a department of Pharmacy and Chemistry. 

It would not be amiss to relate an incident in the experience of your 
Legislative Committee, composed of William Simpson, (the best 
loved man in the State) Edward N. Xadal and myself — after many 
days sojourn in Raleigh during the session of the Legislature of 1881, 
popularizing (now know as lobbying, of which President Wilson is 
so antagonistic) the present bill known as an act "to regulate the prac- 
tice of Pharmacy in North Carolina." Through the kindly offices of 
Hon Frank Grainger, of the House of Representatives and Hon. W. T. 
Dortch of the Senate the Bill was introduced and placed on the 
Calendar and ordered for special hearing for a certain day and hour, 
it having been printed and placed on the desk of each member of the 
House when introduced, with the assurance of Hons. Grainger and 
Dortch and other friends in our efforts — that it was useless for us to 
remain longer we decided to return to our respective homes to be 
surprised a few days later when the bill was announced for considera- 
tion by the Reading Clerk of the House. That one of our political 
solons from the trans-mountain section, ever mindful of the interest 



14 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

of "the man behind the hoe", arose and with the dignity, becoming his 
station, with the air of a Ransom, or Conklin, addressed the Speaker 
of the House, and moved that "That all bills be tabled, that he had the 
honor of resenting folks that was opposed to any law taking away 
the rights of Fanners." Unfortunately Mr. Grainger was temporally 
absent, from his seat and as there was no one who took sufficient inter- 
ets in the bill, either to father or explain its merits, the motion of our 
trans-mountain solon was carried. 

Your committee returned to Raleigh and decided it was best to begin 
de Novo, so with the co-operation of Senator Dortch the bill was intro- 
duced in the Senate and having passed its several readings was sent 
to the house and met more favorable consideration than it had previous- 
ly — this is the present bill, which has been improved by amendment 
from time to time, and you have perhaps now as good a pharmacy law 
as exists in any of the States, for which we are indebted to the Repre- 
sentatives of Wayne County. 

There was another element of opposition to your bill among certain 
professionals, whose greatest asset was Aqua Pura from the town 
pump or some near by spring. 

Take no backward steps, progress with the times, become not a back 
number. Permit me to suggest an extension to your further useful- 
ness by having your Board of Pharmacy require applicants for license 
to become proficient in microscopical examinations, qualitative and 
quantitative determinations, — the usefulness of which is obvious to all 
who practice Pharmacy, and many of you no doubt at times have felt 
the desirability of such knowledge, particularly so in the inspection of 
meats, milk and dietic preparations. 

Another suggestion, one to which I have given considerable thought, 
and apropos of the hour, which should appeal to your chivalry if not 
your wisdom, is to encourage the education of women to practice 
Pharmacy, for all the learned professions there are none that is so 
well adapted to ladies as pharmacy. Their painstaking care, reliability, 
neatness, punctuality and intelligence commend them. 

They have but one disqualifying quality, from a bachelor's view- 
point, their inability to keep a secret, the falsity of which is known by 
all men save and except our bachelor brothers— Why are they so wise? 
They have made good in the fields of human endeavor as bankers, 
educators, manufacturers, railroading, and commercial enterprises, 
—I venture to say not one in these presence, but have the impress of 
their minds in their early education. 

They are noted for their honesty and disinclination to gamble in 
stocks, which commends them as bankers— I know of an instance where 
a lady was made president of a small bank whose capital stock was 
only $5,000.00 who by her financial ability built up the institution whose 
recent exhibit to Dunn and Bradstreet's Agency showed capital stock 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 15 

surplus and undivided profits of $450,000.00, and deposits of $750,000.- 
00, the like of which is phenominal — another instance of a lady who 
was engaged in railroading as secretary and treasurer of a road in 
this State, the duties of general manager having often devolved upon 
her, so managed its affairs, though a short line branch road, sold out 
its holdings at approximately two millions of dollars. 

Among the educators of our State has any a more brilliant record 
than Miss Robinson of Greensboro Female College, Mrs. Shipp of 
Fassifern and Miss May Hendren and Miss Mabel Chadwick of the 
Xew Bern Graded School? 

So open wide your doors to the ladies and bid them to your member- 
ship. 

Father Time has drawn heavily upon your membership and it is 
with profound sorrow I note the absent ones, Hinsdale, Simpson, Nadal, 
Rowland, Pescud, Thompson and many others, whose names I cannot 
recall — all have crossed the river and resting in the shades of the other 
side, awaiting a blissful immortality. 

Among your present membership I recognize but few familiar faces, 
your learned and genial President Jno. Cordon your honored and ac- 
complished president of the Board of Pharmacy, Dr. E. V. Zoeller 
and Dr. Frank W. Hancock, a most loyal member of your Association 
and Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of Pharmacy and of State 
wide fame in the enforcement of the Pharmacy laws. 

Again I tender you in behalf of the local Pharmacists a whole- 
hearted welcome, a welcome to the smiles of New Bern's fair daughters 
a welcome to our parks, a welcome to our beautiful rivers, but I pray 
you to take none of them from us, if such appeal to you abide with us 
and they are all yours, and if you are not so impressed, come again, 
and remember that the latch-string hangs on the outside. 

May your sessions prove emminently satisfactorily both socially and 
educationally, and may your leavetaking carry with you as many pleas- 
ant memories, as vour visit will afford us. 



Response to Address of Welcome by C. P. 
Harper, Selma, N". C. 

Mr. President Ladies and Gentlemen : The hearty welcome which 
has been accorded us has surpassed my expectations. To those of us 
who are visitors in your city, it is very gratifying, it is very satisfying. 
I knew the gentleman's greeting would be kind and cordial, but I did 
not know that he would turn the whole town over to us. If we take 
it, we will promise to be good, to keep off the grass, to let the blind 
tigers alone, and to return it to you in good condition when our three 
days of work and recreation are over. For me to attempt to speak of 



16 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

hospitality without mentioning New Bern, would be like trying to de- 
scribe Switzerland without mentioning the Alps. A year ago at our 
annual meeting in Waynesville, when it was decided to hold this con- 
vention in New Bern, I was delighted, for on former occasions, I had 
come to know something of the hospitality of your warm hearted 
citizens. We know that in the past year your town has charmed its 
visitors by the manner of its entertainment. When conventions have 
assembled here and the delegates have enjoyed the pleasures which it 
affords, they go away feeling that New Bern would be a delightful 
place to live in. 

In history we are told that the Swiss came over from Europe in 
1710, and settled along the shores of the Neuse which has developed 
into your beautiful city. We know something of the hardships which 
they endured, and of the glory which they achieved. If they could 
come back from their resting places, and see the wonderful develop- 
ment which has resulted from their humble beginning, they would be 
amazed. Their hearts would be filled with gladness when they looked 
upon a city and a country which was once a wilderness, blossoming 
like a rose. When we walk down your paved streets, and see your 
magnificent public buildings and your many business enterprises, when 
we go into the residential section and see the beautiful homes, we are 
impressed with the fact that your people are energetic and enterpris- 
ing, and that they have a public spirit, and a civic pride which will 
make any town grow and develop. 

The life of the average druggist is one of confinement and re- 
sponsibility. The daily cares which come to him, and the perplexing 
problems which he must solve are many. In the life of a druggist 
there is a thorn for every rose. At the end of a year's work, upon 
reflection we will find that many pleasures have come to us and one of 
the greatest is our annual meeting. Our pleasures are greatly increased 
on this occasion because we feel that the welcome accorded us is 
genuine and sincere. 

If there is one evidence more than another that we are welcome to 
your city, it is the presence of so many ladies. A man may know how 
to give us the glad hand, to dispense those refreshments which satisfy 
our appetites, and to speak those words which make us happy and con- 
tented, but the presence of ladies adds a grace and a charm to every 
occasion which is elevating and inspiring. Their presence also indi- 
cates that they are taking more interest in the business and professional 
world. We can do our best work when we know that the approving 
eyes of the ladies look down upon us. I want to take this opportunity 
to say that I believe that down behind the great things which men 
accomplish, and back of all the good which they do is the power and 
influence of some good woman. 

At this, the opening sesion of our Convention, we look forward to 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 17 

three days in which we will gain useful knowledge, and to a season 
of recreation and pleasure because we are in the midst of friends who 
are ready to encourage us and extend us every courtesy. 

"How sweet and gracious is that fine sense which men call courtesy ! 
Wholesome as the air, and genial as the light, welcome in every 

clime as breath of flowers. 
It changes our foes into trusting friends, and gives its owner a 

passport around the globe." 
On behalf of the visiting druggists, I want to express our appre- 
ciation of your warm and cheering words of welcome, and for the many 
courtesies which will be extended to us while in your city. Ladies and 
gentlemen, we thank you. 

Me. Bradham : Speaking of the Swiss colony that settled 
on the Xense and Trent River sections, there are many fami- 
lies today who trace their origin from those same Swiss 
people. We have particularly in Jones County a number of 
people whose names are to be known exactly the same names 
and the same people who settled in this section at that time. 
There are many other distinguished families in this section 
whose names are familiar and I now have the pleasure of 
introducing to you as the next speaker one of the original 
settlers of the Swiss colony — Dr. R. D. V. Jones who will 
talk and -welcome you in the name of the physicians of this 
city: 

Welcome Address by Dr. R. D. V. Jones. 

Mr. President and Ladies : When I was asked to bid you welcome on 
behalf of the physicians of this, our city, it was with a keen pleasure 
that I readily accepted, for to me there is no man or body of men who 
I hold in higher esteem. When I passed this building a few days ago 
and heard that body of young men toiling over their examinations, 
my heart went out to them in tender sympathy. It carried me back 
twenty years ago to the time I took my examination before the State 
Board of Pharmacy in 1891. I am proud that I have been a druggist 
and I know what it is to work at the slab from early in the morning 
until late at night. I want to tell you that I have rolled pills all over 
the old North State, from that beautiful city of Asheville in the moun- 
tains to my own town here on the coast. I know how long and tedious 



18 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

are your hours, how careful and painstaking your labors. Pharmacy 
in my mind is a profession which has not yet gained its recognition, 
but I am glad to say that along the line of advancement it is keeping 
pace with other professions and it is not content to alone maintain but 
year after year is raising higher and higher its standard. No calling 
demands a higher type of manhood. A licensed man must be a well 
rounded and well regulated man. 

"We are glad to have you here with us, gentlemen. We Newbern- 
ians are hospitable people, but at the same time, we are endowded with 
a just amount of egotism. We believe we have the best town in the 
State. We are proud of everything which relates to our City — of the 
two streams, our excellent railroad facilities, our public institutions, 
magnificent schools, with approximately iooo pupils enrolled, our 
beautiful street, miles upon miles of pavement. In a business sense, 
no town can boast of a broader gauge of business men than ours. We 
feel that we have an efficient number of physicians and while we may 
not boast of our drug stores, yet we feel that the men who operate 
them measure fully up to the standard in efficiency and brains. While 
there are yet many good things to be said, I might tell you it's not the 
best place for druggists, physicians and undertakers. We have one of 
the cleanest and healthiest towns within the borders of the State and 
with our Health Board we are endeavoring to make it more and more 
so. 

"I wish to extend to you a most cordial welcome. We are more than 
glad to have a body of such representative citizens in our midst. It 
shall be our endeavor to make your stay as pleasant as possible. All I 
regret is, that it is of such a short duration. 

Mr;. Bradham: Way back in the days of 1880 one of our 
distinguished members of the Board of Pharmacy, who is with 

us today, propounded a question to the applicant, and this 
is what it was — "What is the most profitable thing in a drug 
store V One of the young men answered, "The town pump." 
I don't mean to say the next gentleman who is to speak is the 
one who answered, "the town pump." I now have another 
New Bern man to address you. We are sorry he left us, we 
are glad to have him back and now you will hear from Mr. 
F. W. Hancock, of Oxford. 

Air. Hancock responded as follows: 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 19 

Dr. Jones. Mr. President. Gentlemen of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association, Ladies and Gentlemen : I assure you 
it gives me great pleasure again to visit my dear old home town the 
place where I first saw the light and spent my happy boyhood ' and 
early manhood days. I am always glad to put my foot upon her soil 
God bless the dear old place. It is indeed one of North Carolina's 
best towns. Who of us does not love to stand and gaze upon her 
placid waters— those of the Neuse and Trent Rivers? Look at her 
magnihcent churches, her splendid school buildings, that cannot be 
surpassed. What city in the state has better streets, or can surpass 
her 21 miles of granolithic sidewalks? 

Where will you find a more progressive spirit than hers? Let our 
minds revert for a moment to the time when we met here before 
This was on August 9, 18S1, 32 years ago, in the Masonic Hall just 
across the street from this building. This was the 2nd annual session 
of the Association. The officers of the Association at that time were: 

P J. esideni E. M. Nadal. Wilson. 

First I ice-President S. J. Hinsdale. Fayetteville 

Second I Ice-President Wu. Simpson. Raleigh 

Third Fice-President E. H. Meadows, New Bern 

Secretary Dr. T. C Smith. Asheville 

Tr wrer John S. Pecud. Raleigh 

The first three of these have died, and only one of the remaining 
three is now in the drug business (Dr. T. C. Smith of Asheville). 

Forty-one members were present at that meeting, only three of whom 
are here today. These three are E. V. Zoeller, Tarboro, P W 
\aughan, Durham, and myself. Thirty-nine joined at that meeting 
only one of these, our honored President, J. G. M. Cordon, is here 
today. The Board of Pharmacy at that time were: E. M. Nadal of 
Wilson, W. H. Green of Wilmington, E. H. Meadows of New Bern 
William Simpson of Raleigh and A. M. Lee of Raleigh. 

Those in the drug business here at the time of this meeting were: 

Dr. John L. Watkins, Messrs. E. H. Meadows, R. Berry, R. N, 
Duffy, Isaac Dissosway, F. S. Duffy, Frank J. Fulford, and U. S. Mace. 
Only two of these are living, E. H. Meadows and U. S. Mace, and 
neither of them is in the drug business now. 

The practicing Physicians here at that time were: Drs. Isaac W 
Hughes, James F. Long, Edward F. Smallwood, James B Hughes' 
Chas. Duffy, Jr., Francis Duffy, and F. W. Hughes, all of whom* are 
dead except Dr. F. W. Hughes. 

I am glad that as the years pass by our two professions so nearly 
akin to each other are being drawn closer together, our interests in many 
instances being identical. The two professions seem to be mutually in- 



20 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

terested in each other — more so than ever before. We find them having 
annual banquets together, extending countesies to each other in many 
ways, and the physician prescribing more than ever before the prepara- 
tions manufactured by their local druggists. It is impossible to esti- 
mate the importance of these two sister professions. 

The honor of the profession of Pharmacy requires that a high degree 
of education shall be necessary for our success. If any man labor 
under the impression that he can master the difficulties of the pro- 
fession without study he is laboring under a delusion and a snare. 
Thorough preparation should be our watchword. 

What we need is to emulate our sister profession in unity and thor- 
ough organization. See what has been done by the medical profession 
in the state. There has never been a time when North Carolina did 
not possess Physicians of great brilliancy and genius — men who like 
the lamented Dr. Wood of Wilmington united the highest literary 
attainments with the greatest professional skill. For learning, scienti- 
fic attainments, oratory, literary culture, and professional fame, there 
can be found no body of men, whether in colleges, in the Ministry, or 
at the Bar, to surpass the Pbysicians of North Carolina. No profession 
has gone forward more rapidly in advancement than the medical pro- 
fession. Note especially what she has achieved in science and in sur- 
gery. It is truly wonderful and a few years ago it would have been un- 
believable. 

And now, as a former New Bernian, may I not supplement what 
has been said by those who have preceded me by saying to those of 
my profession who are here that, if you are fond of antiquarian re- 
search, we can show you places in this old town that were covered with 
moss and lichen of old age before Raleigh and Greensboro were born. 
If the stirring incidents of the past possess an interest for you, we can 
lead you to the spot where the Royal Governors laid the keystone of 
their palatial splendor and where the fairy form of Esther Wake 
whirled in the mazy changes of the dance through many a dreamy hour. 
If you love to study the history of commerce, we can show you the 
graves of merchant princes, who one hundred years ago sailed over 
these waters fleets of vessels to bring back rich tributes of foreign 
lands. If you, as North Carolinians, prize the intellectual records of the 
state, we can point you to the tombs of jurists, Orators, and Statesmen, 
whose eloquence and learning were the pride and glory of a vanished 
age, and whose sleeping dust has rendered sacred every foot of 
ground of the famed city where they lie buried. In short, if you seek 
the pure air that blows from the neighboring sea, or the luxuries 
afforded by these waters to the appetite of man, or the joyous company 
illustrated and adorned by fair women you will find them all in the 
Athens of North Carolina, which is New Bern, the City of Elms. 

And now, my dear Doctor, allow me to return to you and through 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 21 

you to the medical profession of the town, our sincere thanks for 
your cordial welcome. 

Roll call of members by the Secretary. 

The reading of the minutes of last meeting were dispensed 
with, since they arc found in the proceedings of last year- 
meeting. 

Mr. Zoellek : I wish to correct an error in last year's 
minutes, as there was a mistake in the Report of the Com- 
mittee on the President's address. The address was referred 
to Messrs Raysor, Hood and myself. I was occupied with 
the board work during the entire time and left the matter to 
the attention of Roth and Hood. Then when the matter did 
come up, Raysor had gone home and Hood and I were present. 
This report was presented by Roth, who was appointed for 
Raysor. The report is signed by myself, which is a mistake. 
When I saw that, Hood and Raysor stated that they did not 
think the condition of North Carolina required prerequisite 
graduation for examination, — I then refused to sign the re- 
port. That is the main point I wish to correct. I hold views 
contrary to those the report appears to represent in the pro- 
ceedings. I wish a statement correcting that mistake which 
got in there some way or other. Perhaps the stenographer 
failed to get complete notes. I suppose that accounts for 
this error. 

Introductions and presentations of visiting guests of the 
association. 

Me. Hancock: We thought at one time we were going to 
get Professor Beal here with us, but about a month ago T 
heard from him that it was impossible for him to be here and 
I then corresponded with Barry B. Mason, who is editor of 
the Bulletin Pharmacy of Detroit, Mich., but at the last mo- 
ment, we were disappointed and so I am sorry to state that we 
have no special speaker for this occasion. 



22 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Mr. Yearby : Allow me to introduce Mr. Reinheimer. 
(He only arose but did not make any speech.) 

Ah\ Yearby then asked Mr. Marsden for a talk. 

Mr. Marsden : Robert L. Powers promised to do the 
talking for me. You will please excuse me, as I cannot make 
a speech. 

Robert L. Powers: I did not come prepared to make a 
speech, but after getting here, Mr. Howell gave me a copy of 
the original bill of R. W. Powers dated October 18, 1862. I 
want to show you some of the progress of the wholesale drug 
business. Here is a bill that Williams and Haywood bought 
October :), 1862: 

io lbs. carb. magnesia per lb $1.25 

5 lbs. precip. carb. iron 1.50 

4 oz. lunar caustic 5.00 

21 lbs. ground black pepper 1.30 

4 1-2 lbs. cinnamon i.oo 

50 lbs. epsom salts 1.20 

20 gross, corks 1.50 

2 gallons Sprs. Ammonia 2.00 

bottle 15 

1 gross matches 2.00 

2 lbs. sprts. nitre 7.00 

2 boxes 2.25 

drayage 50 

I want to thank the convention for being with them, and 
it is always my intention to attend these associations when- 
ever I can. I was in Waynesville last year and am glad to 
be ;ii tlio seashore again. 

Vice-President: Those of us who feel that we are paying 
too much for drugs now are relieved to see how much those 
people paid at that time. 

Ah;. Yearby: I have a friend, Mr. Vaughan, who sells 
most all of vou and I would like for vou to hear from him. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 23 

Vatjghan : I am very sorry I am not much of a before- 
dinner speaker. I don't know that I could say anything that 
would be of interest to any of you gentlemen. I always try 
to be here and hope to be with you next year in Durham. 

Mr. Bowers of Richmond, was repeatedly called upon for a 
speech. 

Mk. Bowers : I hope you will always see Bowers at every 
meeting, but Powers does our talking for us in Richmond and 
I think he ought to do it down here. I can assure you that 
the jobbers welfare and prosperity depends upon your welfare 
and prosperity and all you do here will be backed by myself 
and my fellow workers. I thank you. 

Mr. Whitaker representing H. K. Mulford & Co., of Rich- 
mond was then asked to make a talk. 

Mr. Whitakeb : Mr. Chairman, and gentlemen : I usually 
let John Rowe do my talking, but I don't see him this morn- 
ing. I am very glad, indeed, to be with you, and I am coming 
again next year and I suppose you will hear enough of my 
talking in the meantime. 

Mr. Van Gordon when called upon replied: 

i- I can surely say I am glad to be here. I hope to be with 
yon many more times. They always send me word from 
the house that I must be here. I received word a couple of 
weeks ago while I was at Roanoke, Va., and I came on from 
there. You will have to excuse me from making a speech for 
I am not much of a speech maker." 

F. W. Hancock : Please ask those who have not spoken to 
stand up and say what firm they are with. 

Mr. Toone, representing Richard Gwaltney & Co. : 

• "I want to say that I am glad to be here to see my friends, 
old friends, and make new ones. I have not been in the 



24 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

State of North Carolina for three years, but T am glad to he 
with you and hope to be with you every time. 

Mr. Shaw, of Muth Bros. : 

"I am comparatively a new man among your midst. I had 
the pleasure of being with you last year and I also enjoy 
being with you today. One of the representatives of my 
firm disappointed me in coming this time, but I am doing the 
besl I can to represent them. 1 thank you very much." 

Mi;. Miller: I have been visiting at the association meet- 
ings for the last three years. Morehead City two years ago and 
Last year al Waynesville and this year here. I don't know 
how they got my name down as Bodeker. J - am with the 
Bodeker Drug Co. I think they must have gotten it from that 
speech I made at Waynesville. The name is all right and I 
hope this will be a successful meeting for each of you. 

A delegate offered the following new member-: 

K. .1. Patterson and < >. L Smith. Mr. Hancock also 
offered L. W. Phillips and A. E. Phillips ;i- associate mem- 
bers. 

J. B. Bowers: I wish to state that Josiah Yaughan of the 
Vaughan Drug Co., is now deceased and Mr. Marsden re- 
presents that firm here. That line of associate member- has 
been attended to yearly. It is a useless appendage to your 
proceedings, it looks to me. If we have ever done anything 
as a body of the association for you, I don't remember it. 
We should work individually, but I think if we are to be 
associate members of this association, we ought to have some 
organized work and I would be glad to see them come to my 
room for organization. I don't like to be a member of any- 
thing and do nothing. 

W. II. Wearn : If our Associate friends feel as Mr. Powers 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 25 

does, I think it would be a great benefit to our Association 
if they will take that step. 

('. C. Sherrill: At the Greensboro meeting in 1908 it 
was moved that the Associate Members Organize — which 
they did, and adopted some rules and regulations, and I 
think if Mr. Powers will look up the minutes of that meeting 
he will find an organization at the Greensboro Meeting, 
where a resolution was adopted that contained their By- 
Laws and all. If they will look this up it will possibly help 
them to organize. 

IT. L. Powers: We can organize, but unless we do some 
work the organization will net do us any good. I am willing 
to do my part to get together. 

Chairman: While we are always glad to have the travel- 
ing men with us, yet we would be glad to see them affect an 
organization that will co-operate with the Druggists Associa- 
tion. 

I. E. Van Gordon: Two years age we had members 
enough in Virginia to put up $750 to help pay expenses of 
the big banquet we had there, and I don't believe there is a 
man that belongs to our auxiliary but what is willing to help 
pay these expenses, and if they would get up some nice 
entertainment, it would be of -roar help to the Association. 
I don't ever hear anything about the meeting's or anything 
of that kind — but always help them out every way T can. 
I always have the letter sent to me from my house in Virginia 
so that I will know what time the meeting is. I for one would 
like to join the auxiliary. 

Mr. Lee Reinheimer: I happened to be in Greensboro 
in L908 at the time the traveling men organized. I was elect- 
ed one of the Vice-Presidents. It was awfully hard to get 
the travelling men together on an occasion of this kind. 
There was absolutely no organization. It is only one way for 



26 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

the travelling men to organize and that is to be associated 
with the people, and under jour head. Let them act with 
vnii and be enrolled with you. 

J. B. Bowers : Then we are all more or less dead members. 
A member to anything that does not contribute to it finan- 
cially, or in any way. 1 consider a dead member. This Asso- 
ciation has never had enough money — has it ? We ought to 
he allowed the pleasure of contributing to your Treasurer. 
That is up in the Association entirely. Y"ou say we can't do 
anything under organization. We want to do everything. 
We want to help the Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation if you will only let us. I for one, want to help you all. 
Let ns pay due-; we are Associate Members, and don't pay 
anything — can't we do that? I am in favor of the traveling 
men as a body paying $50.00 per year. 

Me. Lee Reinheimek : I would like to see a member of 
your Association put a motion that the traveling men pay the 
same a- everybody else, and let them come in with them — I 
make that as a motion. 

J. B. Bowers: Can an Associate Member make a motion. 

( !. 1). Bradham : I think that motion is out of order. You 
can't amend the by-laws by a motion, and you would have to 
amend the By-Laws before you could make the Associate 
Members pay dues. 

C. D. Sedbeery: I move that further discussion of this 
subject he postponed until afternoon session. 

P. W. Vaeghax : I would suggest that the Associate Mem- 
ber- have a meeting at the hotel between this and the other 
session, and they could organize then if they desired to do so. 

II. K. Grantham: We have a Traveling Men's Auxiliary 
which was organized at Greensboro, and you will find that 
the traveling men assessed themselves and they donated from 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 2 i 

their own contributions to the Auxiliary of the Association — 
they made their own fees — do you rememher Mr. Bowers '. 

J. B. Bowers: Yes that was $2.50 and I sent it to Mr. 
Smith. 

Me. Ktjhn : One of the best uses the traveling men could 
be put to, is to secure new members and organize us in a 
body of BOOSTEBS — get new members, take applications 
with us an try to get a lot of druggists as new members and 
get them to come to the annual meetings. What a good time 
we are going to have in Durham next year. (Applause.) 

Chairman : Would it not be a good idea among the travel- 
ing men to reorganize. Leave this to the traveling men. and 
let them adjust it as they wish to. 

F. W. Hancock: I have been requested to extend an invi- 
tation to all the members of the Association on their return 
this afternoon to go through the Pepsi-Cola Plant. 

Motion made and carried that the Association 'adjourn 
until 3:30 p. m. 



2S North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

SECOND SESSION 

School Auditobitjm, 
Wednesday, 3:30 p. in. 

Association was called to order by Vice-President, C. P. 
Harper. 

The Committee on Time and Place of next Meeting: 

W. H. Justus, P. W. Vaughan, F. S. Duffy, was appoint- 
ed by the President. 

The Secretary read communications from the following 
cities inviting the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion there for the year 1914: 

Hendersonville, Durham, Raleigh, and Salisbury; also the 
Secretary read the following communication from the Tampa- 
Cuba Cigar Co: 

We are today taking the liberty of sending you by express a package 
of free cigars 250 to be given out during the convention and 25 to be 
awarded as a prize. We are also including some advertising matter and 
are going to ask that you kindly distribute this to the best interest of 
your company. We will let you use your own judgment as to the best 
and most effective manner of handling it. 

Thanking you in advance and wishing the delegates a thoroughly 
good time, we remain. 

Cordially yours, 

TAMPA-CUBA CIGAR CO. 

The Secretary also read the following from the National 
Association of Retail Druggists: 

I am sending you under separate cover 20 copies of the journal for 
distribution at your convention. This issue contains valuable infor- 
mation on price, protection and other subjects. We will be much 
pleased if these copies are taken to the convention hall and given out. 
Hoping that your convention will be the best ever, I remain, with 
kind regards. 

Sincerelv yours, 

CHAS. M. CARR. 






North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 29 

The Secretary read the following from the Welsh Grape 
Juice Company: 

I have just received a letter from Air. G. E. Burwell, Treasurer of 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, informing me that you 
(Mr. Bradham) have charge of the local arrangement for the meeting 
of your association June nth to 13th and I am writing you to say that 
I am preparing to contribute what I can do in the way of an exhibit 
and free dispensing of Welsh's Grape Juice, as has been my custom 
for some years past, to the members of the association during the meet- 
ing. I will appreciate a line from you advising me in what building 
the meetings will be held so as to enable me to make intelligent prepara- 
tions for the service. 

Thanking you in advance, I remain, 

Yours very truly, 

A. J. PHILLIPS, 
District Sates Manager. 

Letter from American Pharmaceutical Association as fol- 
lows : 

Dear Mr. Beard : 

I have appointed E. V. Zoeller, of Tarboro, and E. V. Howell, of 
Chapel Hill, delegates to represent the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation at the coming meeting of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association. I enclose a copy of the notification and have sent one to 
each of the delegates together with a letter from the Chairman of the 
Membership Committee, Professor A. H. Clark, urging them to make 
an effort to secure new members of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association. 

I hope that you will give our delegates what assistance you can in 
this regard and wishing the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion a most successful meeting and yourself a large measure of health 
and prosperity, I remain, 

Yerv truly, 



W. B. DAY, 
President. 



Merer Brothers Druooists wrote 



Dear Mr. Beard : 

This Journal will consider it a privilege to donate three prizes to 
members of your Association, the same to be awarded at the 1913 
meeting, under conditions arranged by you or some appropriate com- 



30 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

mittee. The prizes we place at your disposal are as follows : 

First prize, three year's subscription to the Meyer Brothers Druggist; 
second prize, two year's subscription to the Meyer Brothers Druggist; 
third prize, one year's subscription to the Meyer Brothers Druggist. 

If the party is already a subscriber, we will extend his subscription 
for the length of time designated by the prize he wins. 
Trusting this will be satisfactory to your association, we are, 
Very truly, 
MEYER BROTHERS DRUGGISTS. 

jSTationa] Wholesale Druggists' Association wrote as fol- 
lows : 

Dear Mr. Beard : 

I beg to inform you that President Plaut has appointed the follow- 
ing delegates to represent this association at the next meeting of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association which I understand will 
be held at Newbern June nth to 13th:— John F. Sprague, W. H. King 
Drug Co., Raleigh, X. C. : A. G. Ahren, Ahrens' Brothers, Wilmington. 
X. C; John M. Scott, of John M. Scott & Co., Charlotte, N. C. 

I have sent credentials to our delegates and with best wishes for a 
large and successful meeting, I am, 

Yours verv trulv, 

J. E. TOMS. 
Secretary. 

A card from one of the old and very loyal members, Mr. 
Win. Neistlie was road: 

Dear Mr. Beard : 

Your invitation received for Newbern. I am sorry I cannot be with 
you. I hope you will be reelected, also Brother F. W. Hancock, both 
for your old places. 
With best wishes. 

NEISTLE, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Scio. Ohio. May 12, 1913. 
Mr. J. G. Beard. 

Secretary North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. 
Chapel Hill. North Carolina. 
Dear Secretary Beard : 

I desire to extend through you to the North Carolina Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association the cordial greetings of the American Pharmaceutical 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 31 

Association, and its good wishes for a successful and profitable annual 
meeting. 

The prosperity and healthy activity of the state associations are 
vital to the reform and progress of pharmacy. Druggists who do not 
actively support their state associations sin against the calling from 
which they gain a livelihood and stand in the way of their own pros- 
perity. 

While the state associations have accomplished much for pharmacy 
their accomplishments have been infinitesimal compared to what 
they might have been had they received adequate support from the 
rank and file of druggists for whose benefit they have so earnestly 
labored. 

It was because the American Pharmaceutical Association believed in 
the necessity of these bodies that in early days it charged its members 
with the duty of seeing that pharmaceutical associations were formed in 
every state, and it was in consequence of this policy that most of the 
state associations were originally organized. 

The American Pharmaceutical Asociation believes and teaches that 
it is as much the duty of the retail druggists to help support his state 
association as it is a part of business prudence to keep his stock insured 
against fire, and it also believes and teaches that if the great majority 
of retail druggists will give their steadfast support to their local, state 
and national association, they can look forward to obtaining almost any 
reasonable measure they may ask for, and to obtaining other reforms 
for their professional and financial benefit that now seem almost im- 
possible. 

At its annual meeting held in Denver in 1912, the American Phar- 
maceutical Association created a House of Delegates to which each 
state association is entitled to send three representatives. It is the 
purpose of this House of Delegates to provide a means whereby the 
state asociations can express themselves upon questions of national 
importance, and whereby also questions of national importance under 
consideration by the American Pharmaceutical Association can be re- 
ferred to the state associations for their consideration. This new 
feature of the American Pharmaceutical Association promises to be of 
great usefulness in correlating and harmonizing opinions upon phar- 
maceutical questions throughout the United States, and we trust that 
your association will refer to it such questions and resolutions as you 
deem of general or national importance. 

Your asociation is entitled to three delegates in the new House, and 
we earnestly hope they will be present at the 61st annual meeting which 
will convene at Nashville, Tennessee, August 18, 1913. 

No financial obligation is incurred by the sending of delegates, and 
no action of the House is binding upon the associations represented 
therein unless they voluntarily approve and indorse such action. The 



32 North Carol inn Pharmaceutical Association 

American Pharmaceutical Association also tenders you the free use of 
its official Journal for the publication of your announcements, and of 
any papers, addresses, or other portions of your annual proceedings. 

Again wishing you a meeting that shall be abundantly successful 
from every point of view, and that the druggists of your state may 
be brought to see the necessity of giving your association the united 
and hearty support which it so richly merits, I remain, 

Sincerely yours, 

J. H. BEAL, 
eral Secretary American Pharmaceutical Association. 

To the members of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
in Convention assembled at Newbern, X. C: 
Dear Friends: 

It is with profound regret that I find myself prevented at the last 
moment from attending a meeting to which I had looked forward with 
much pleasure. I had made all preparations to leave when circum- 
stances arose which made it imperative for me to remain in Asheville 
this week. I have taken the pleasure to write a paper which I would 
be pleased to have read before the association, a copy of which I have 
sent to Professor Howell, and will enclose another copy herewith in 
case the other in some way should be miscarried. 

I trust you will have an interesting and profitable meeting, and will 
be with you in spirit if not in person. Entertaining the sincere wish 
that I may have the pleasure of being with you next year wherever you 
may decide to meet, I beg to remain. 

RICHARD H. ROTH, 
Asheville, X. C. 

P. W. Vaughan read a letter from the Mayor of Durham. 
extending an invitation for the next year's meeting also from 
Durham's Retail Merchant's Association and Retail Club of 
Durham, as well as a letter from the Retail Druggists and 
Durham's Commonwealth Club, he stating the following: 

"I believe Durham was on the list for last year's meeting, 
but wo have rouio insisting that you moot with us this year 
ami I am glad that you postponed your meeting last year with 
us because our now hotel was not finished. We shall expect 
the association to make that hotel their headquarters when 
they meet there next year. I can tell you a lot about Durham 
and we have everything there except the seashore and the 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 33 

mountains. We have the hospitality that makes a man feel 
good and at home when he comes there. We will all see to 
it that you have a good time at the next session if you will 
only promise to meet in Durham, so I hope your associa- 
tion will honor Durham, as you have not met in that city 
since 1899. I most earnestly extend to you a cordial invita- 
tion to meet in the City of Durham. The President has 
appointed me on time and place for the next meeting'. We 
are not exactly ready to report to the Convention but I think 
we will report Durham." 

June 9th. 1913. 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 

In Session Newebm, North Carolina, 1913 
Gentlemen : 

The Commercial Club of Durham extends to you a most cordial 
invitation to hold your next annual meeting in the Bull City. Greater 
Durham has never been honored with your presence for the reason 
that our hotel facalities have not been equal to the occasion. However 
we wish to assure you that we can now take care of you as well, if not 
better, than most of the cities in the State. 

We want to show you some Durham hospitality. 
Being located in the central part of the State we are in easy access 
of all other points, and for this reason you can count on having the 
largest attendance you ever had. 

The city will be yours while you are with us and you can have 
whatever you want, regardless of what the nigger calls the "Search 
and Take It Law," so plan to come and we are confident that you will 
want to return each year thereafter. 
With best wishes, 

Sincerely, 

S. C. CHAMBERS, 
President Commercial Club of Durham. 

June 9, 1913. 
To the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
In Session Newbern, N. C, 
The Retail Druggists Association of Durham extends to you a most 
cordial invitation to hold your next annual meeting in the city of 
Durham. Durham is centrally located, accessible from all points and 
may be rightfully called the convention citv of North Carolina. Our 



34 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

hotel facilities are ample to take good care of you so we shall expect 
you. 

Sincerely yours, 

GERMAIN BERNARD, 
President Durham Retail Merchants Association. 

June io, 1913. 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Convention, 

Newbern, N. C. 
Gentlemen : 

We, as an association wish to extend the courtesies of our associa- 
tion and City to your body, and extend an invitation to you to hold 
your annual convention in our City next year, and trust you will accept 
our invitation. 
We have ample facilities for taking care of your body. 
Hoping that you will meet us in Durham in 1914, we are 

Yours truly, 
THE DURHAM MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION, 
Thos. M. Gorman. 
Vice-President. 



June 9, 1913. 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 

New Bern. X. C, 
Gentlemen : 

The undersigned Association of the City of Durham extends to you 
a most cordial invitation to hold your annual meeting in 1914 in the 
City of Durham. No place in the State of North Carolina has better 
facilities for entertaining a gathering than the City of Durham, nor 
has any place in the State more things of general and particular interest 
to visitors than this community. There are two magnificient hotels — 
the Lochmoor and the Malbourne — with other minor hotels sufficient 
to accomodate your Association. This County has more and better 
roads than any in the State we believe. It is also near the educational 
institutions of vital interest to the people of the State, and also the 
home of manufacturing industries of world-wide fame. We would like 
to entertain your Association, and most cordially and earnestly invite 
you to hold your next meeting in our community, at which time neither 
pains nor expense will be spared to make your stay delightful and 
profitable. 

Yours very truly, 
THE DURHAM MERCHANT'S ASSOCIATION, 
Luther B. Markham, 
President. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 35 

Tune io, 1013. 
Mr. P. W. Vaugfian, 

Durham , X. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Many of the prominent citizens of Durham have spoken to me in 
regard to extending an invitation to the Pharmaceutical Association 
of North Carolina to hold its next meeting in the City of Durham. 

As you know, our hotel facilities are now ample and all things are 
ready for making the meeting of your body pleasant and profitable. 
The heads of the different organizations of the City are very anxious 
to have the Association come to Durham for their next annual meeting, 
and in behalf of the citizens of Durham I earnestly request that you 
use every effort to persuade or force the Association to select Durham 
as their next meeting place, and you are further authorized to assure 
them that everything will be done to make their meeting pleasant and 
profitable. 

Yours truly, 

' W. J. BROGDEN, 
Mayor. 

John Spkague : Ladies and gentlemen, I caught an early 
train this morning from Raleigh and I listened with a great 
deal of pleasure to the different invitations. My grip contains 
an invitation from the Governor and every organization in 
the City of Raleigh, but I am sorry to say it was lost in tran- 
sit and I am now here to invite you all in person to come to 
Raleigh next year. We have everything there that will give 
you pleasure. 

W. M. Yearby: The gentleman who just got up and spoke 
is so near East Durham that we call it a suburb of Durham. 
(Applause). In behalf of the City of Durham, I want to 
say we want you next year and we are going to do everything 
Ave can to make the entertainment successful and give you all 
the pleasure you are looking for. We have not had, in times 
gone by, the hotel facilities that we have now. We are going 
to have several conventions next year and we want the North 
< Jarolina Pharmaceutical Association to meet in Durham, 
which is the most progressive city in the state. 



36 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

The following invitation from Hendersonville was read by 
W. H. Justus. 



Hendersonville, N. C. 
The Greater Hendersoxville Club extends to the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association a cordial invitation to hold the next con- 
vention in Hendersonville, "Nature's Roof Garden." 

We had the North Carolina Medical Society with us last year, and 
will entertain the North Carolina Dental Society in June, 1914. Ample 
hotel accommodations at reasonable rates are available, and spledid 
arrangements can be made for the examinations. 

The Greater Hendersonville Club, in conjunction with the Ladies 
Auxiliary, Town Council and merchants of the city, will provide for 
suitable entertainment. A formal invitation will be conveyed to your 
association during this week. 

We look forward to the pleasure of entertaining you in our midst 
next year. 

Yours very truly, 
GREATER HENDERSONVILLE CLUB, 
H. C. Meyer, 
Secretary. 

E. L. Taekington : As the Virginia Association meets 
next July, and take- a boat trip from Norfolk to Boston, why 
could we not hold our meeting' with them, and hold our ses- 
sion on the boat '. 

Secretary: That is referred to the Time and Place Com- 
mittee. 

Also an invitation was presented from the Salisbury Mer- 
chant- Association in the following words: 

I hereby extend an invitation to the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association in the name of the Salisbury Industrial Club and Salis- 
bury Merchant's Association to meet with us next year. No City has 
better hotel and railroad facilities than we have. "Salisbury's the 
place." 

MRS. S. W. SUMMERS, 
Secretary. 



North Carol ina Pharmaceutical Association 37 

Also an invitation was presented from the President of the 
Salisbury Industrial Club : 

We invite and earnestly request the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association to meet in Salisbury next year. All our druggists join in 
this invitation. Assure you that Salisbury's the best city in North 
Carolina and that we will entertain you while here in keeping with 
your profession. 

President. 
H. A. Rouzer, 

These various invitations were referred to the Committee 
on Time and Place of Meeting. 

C. D. Bradham : I want to extend an invitation, not only 
to the members of the association, but all the attending travel- 
ing men and their friends and anyone who would like to come- 
to attend a reception at my residence tonight between the 
hours of 8 and 11 p. m. It's informal and if you have no 
dress suit, you need not worry about it. 

The chair called for the report of the Secretary. 

Secretary: As Mr. Burwell had a number of dues paid 
today which would necessitate a re-arrangement of his report, 
he asks that it be deferred until tomorrow morning, if this 
suits the association. Quite a number waited until they 
came to Newbern to pay their dues, which tore up his report 
and I wish also not to read mine until then. 

Delegate : I move that the North Carolina Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association become affiliated with the National Associa- 
tion of Retail Druggists. 

H. K. Grantham : I made a motion two years ago to ap- 
point a committee of three and spend that money one year 
trying to boost the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. I don't think that went on record as being oppossed. 



38 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

C. D Beadham : Grantham's motion was simply to pre- 
vent the association from passing a resolution. It didn't 
mean anything else. I think it was the desire or intention of 
the Association to prevent that being done. 

Treasurer: Mr. Grantham's resolution was — instead of 
paying the annual dues and working up the membership, 
that that $50.00 be used as he said, in other words, we ceased 
being a member of the Xational Association of Eetail Drug- 
gists. 

W. II. Wearn: I make a motion that we do not join the 
National Association of Retail Druggists, which motion was 
seconded by Mr. Sprague. 

( '. D. Bradham: I don't think we should go on record as 
being opposed to joining the National Association of Retail 
Druggists. I make a motion that the communication be filed 
and no action be taken on it whatever. 

J. P. Stowe : I would like to second Mr. Bradkam's 
resolution that this be tabled. 

W. H. Wearn : I will withdraw my motion. 

C. D. Beadham : I move that it be published in the pro- 
ceedings, but no action taken at alb Carried. 

Secretary: Since reading the communication from the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, I note each state is 
entitled to send three representative^ in addition to their 
regular Delegates as members of the newly created Union of 
Delegates. 

J. E. Shell: 1 think it in order to appoint any delegates 
that g<> to the various Pharmaceutical Associations we should 
wait until tomorrow. Find out who will attend the American 
Pharmaceutical Association meeting and appoint three of 
them as delegates to this house. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 39 

Chairman : In order to induce some one to go, I think we 
will have to pay their expenses. 

W. H. Weakn : Of course, this is a matter for the incoming 
president, but it seems to me it will be all right to appoint the 
full number. If we are entitled to six, appoint six. Of 
course, the president can use his own judgement as to whether 
or not he can get six. 

Chairman : We will find out who want to go and then ap- 
point the other three. 

Adjournment was taken until 10 o'clock, Thursday morn- 
ing. June 12th, 1913. 



40 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



THIRD SESSION 

School Auditorium, 
Thursday Morning, 10.00. 

The Secretary read the following new communications 
which had just been received : 

June 8, 1913. 
Mr. J. G. Heard, Secretary, 

North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
Chapel Hill, N. C, 
Dear Mr. Beard : 

I beg to extend the hearty and fraternal greetings of the National 
Association of Retail Druggists to the North Carolina State Pharma- 
ceutical Association in Annual Meeting assembled at Newbern, North 
Carolina, and sincerely trust that your sessions may be largely attended 
and productive of much good to its members. 

By resolution passed in Milwaukee at 1912 Annual meeting of the 
National Association of Retail Druggists, no State Association can 
this year pay more than $25.00 dues, which entitles it to two delegates 
to the Annual Convention, the representation from the local affiliated 
Associations remaining the same as in former years. 

It was thought this innovation in State Asociation dues would stimu- 
late a greater interest among the members of the State Association and 
promote the moral and fraternal feeling that should actuate the numer- 
ous associations now affiliated with the National Association. 

We have now started a new campaign promoting price protection. 
It cannot be denied that the National Association of Retail Druggists 
was the first in the field to initiate price protection for the benefit of 
the retail druggists of America. Through constant and consistent 
agitation we have now enlisted the Sympathies and attention of all 
other retail commercial trade organizations as also many professors 
and many prominent writers on economic questions in the Journals and 
magazines of this country. 

We may also state with pride that President Wilson is also in hearty 
sympathy with our desires provided we do not encroach upon the 
Sherman Anti-Trust Act. Already through his powerful influence 
there has been enacted into law in the State of New Jersey a measure 
that will largely restrict the cutting of retail prices in order to facili- 
tate sales. May we not hope also to have the powerful influence of 
the various State Associations in promoting similar measures in every 
State in our Union. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 41 

Enclosed please rind verbatim copy of New Jersey Law, approved 
April I, 1913, which I trust you will have read at one of your sessions 
and referred to your Legislative Committee for action. 

The National Association of Retail Druggists annual Convention 
will be held this year at Cincinnati the week of August 25th and we 
sincerely hope your State Association may be represented by two dele- 
gates as it promises to be the largest and most important meeting in its 
history. 

Trusting your Convention will take this into serious consideration 
and that we shall have the pleasure of meeting two delegates repre- 
senting your State Association at our meeting in Cincinnati, I beg 
to remain, 

Fraternallv vours, 

T. H. POTTS, 
Secretary. 

ASSEMBLY NO. 668 
STATE OF NEW JERSEY 

Ax Act to Prevent Unfair Competition and Unfair Trade Practice. 

Be it Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of State of New 
Jersey. 

It shall be unlawful for any merchant, firm or corporation, for the 
purpose of attracting trade for other goods, to appropriate for his or 
their own ends a name, brand, trademark, reputation or good will of 
any maker in whose product said merchant, firm or corporation deals, 
or to discriminate against the same, by depreciating the value of such 
products in the public mind, or by misrepresentation as to value or 
quality, or by price inducement, or by unfair discrimination between 
buyers, or in any other manner whatsoever, except in cases where said 
goods do not carry any notice prohibiting such practice, and excepting 
in case of a receiver's sale, or a sale by a concern going out of business. 

Any person, firm or corporation violating this act shall be liable at 
the suit of the maker of such branded or trade-marked goods or any 
other injured person, to an injunction against such practices and shall 
be liable in such suit for all damages directly or indirectly caused to 
the maker by such practices, which said damages may be increased 
threefold, in the discretion of the court. 

This act shall take effect immediately. Approved April 1st, 1013. 

Philadelphia. 
To the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association Assembled, 

Mr. J. G. Beard, Secretary. 
Dear Sir: 
The Woman's Organization of the National Association of Retail 



42 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Druggists once more extends most hearty and cordial greetings and 
best wishes for a very successful meeting. 

As you enter upon another year of effort for the betterment of con- 
ditions in Pharmacy, may prosperity and success be yours. 

May we hope that the movement for shorter hours and partial Sun- 
day rest be an accomplished fact in your State this year? 

In order to interest the wives, daughters, mothers and sisters of the 
members of your Organization, and enable them to have a share in the 
good work we are trying to do, will you not send their names for 
membership in the Woman's Organization National Association of 
Retail Druggists to the Secretary? 

Sincerely and fraternally yours, 

JESSIE F. WATERHOUSE, 
President. 
NELLIE FLORENCE LEE, 
Secretary. 
MRS. S. C. HENRY, 
Chairman of Fraternal Relations Committee. 
P. S.— Please read this greeting to the Convention. 



Raleigh, N. C, June u, 1913. 
Mr. J. M. G. Cordon. President. 

North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
New Bern. N. C, 
Dear Sir: 

Please accept best wishes for a pleasant and profitable meeting. I 
regret exceedingly that I am unable to be with you this time. 

Fraternally, 

HENRY T. HICKS. 
P. S. — Come to Raleigh next year and we will try to make you 
comfortable. 

H. T. H. 

Warrensburg, Mass., June 10, 1913. 
J. G. Beard. Secretary Pharmaceutical Association, 
Newbern, X. C. 
Fraternal Greetings. Will meet you at Nashville August Eighteen. 

H. M. WHELPLEYSECY, 

President J. G. M. Cordon then delivered his address. 
He arrived Wednesday night, and expressed his regret to the 
Association at having been delayed. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 43 

Mr. F. W. Hancock took the chair while the President was 
essage. 

President Ookdon's Message 



(iKxtlkmkx : The closing year lias been, I believe, a prosperous one 
for most of the Druggists of the state. 

It has not been a time for making money easily, but has afforded the 
usual opportunity of making a living. While I am told that in some 
places cut prices have prevailed, itinerant venders have reduced the 
profits in some localities, there have been very few absolute failures, if 
any, and business has moved along smoothly for most of us. 

Some things have happened this year, however, that are worthy of 
notice. 

First among them is the failure of the proposed changes in our 
Pharmacy Law, by the hands of committees of the last Legislature. 
There was concerted and strong efforts made, and consistent to in- 
struction of this body by those having the matter in charge, showed by 
a vote of 3 to 2 that the committee of the legislature decided adversely 
to report in favor of it. Your president thinks it acted unwisely and 
not in keeping with the more progressive like bodies of other states, 
and he advises this body to repeat its efforts in this direction, because 
it ought never be said that the Phramacists of the Old North State are 
behind any of its other organized industries in working for the uplift 
and general good of their state. You are too intelligent men not to 
recognize that the trend of all scientific advancement is along the line 
of profficiency and efficiency in public service. We should have men 
serving the public in our profession, equal to any in the Union. This 
we cannot have so long as our Board of Pharmacy is compelled to 
accept trained parrots, as it were, and license them to fool the public. 

Another item: we had believed that thecontract plan of selling goods 
was impregnable. We now know that it cannot hold. What will 
eventually result from the recent decision of the Supreme Court is 
very much in doubt, and a decisive plan is yet to be settled upon that 
will prevent the cutting of contract or patent lines of goods. That 
some plan will eventually be evolved is my firm conviction. I am free 
to say that I cannot suggest an idea that would serve to engage your at- 
tention at present. 

The failure to secure proper laws to prevent itinerant venders from 
plying their trade is another- matter for our consideration; this body 
should frame a law, and charge a committee from its membership, to 
secure the passage by the next Legislature of some definite tax medium, 
besides requiring a license of competency from those who would sell to 



44 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

the public any kind of preparation they recommend for the common 
ills of mankind. Up to this time all Pharmacy Laws, as far as I 
have been able to find out, have been written for the protection of the 
common people only. The Pharmacist made to comply to certain 
restrictions to conduct a Pharmacy, but in return provision is not made 
to restrict sales of Drugs and Medicines to the registered qualified 
Pharmacist except the sales of certain Poisons, and the preparing of 
Physician's prescriptions. The Law in many States differ in these 
points but in the main it is true that not only Department Stores, but 
General Stores, and Cross-Roads country stores, may, and do sell 
much of the merchandise that ought in justice be restricted to the 
Pharmacist. For myself, I believe the time is at hand when we should 
begin an education of the public to the possible and probable, I should 
say I think, actual danger to their accepting medicines compounded by 
the practicing Physician out of the junk often found in the back room 
of his office. There is not one of us present, who does not know of 
this, and why remain silent ? Why should we not say to people "you 
require a certain efficiency of us, then why should you let one who does 
not even know the first principles of compounding drugs, serve you in 
such a hazardous manner." A proper, assertive line of plain talk in a 
lucid, truthful way through the public press, would cause many of them 
to sit up and take notice, and I think, work a change for the better, 
in this very obnoxious custom that has nothing to commend it, only 
serving the more to swell the Physician's purse. 

I must say that the Parcel Post has not proved the great Bug-a-Boo 
we all thought it would be, but has served and will the better serve, 
those who meet its possibilities and use it in an intelligent way. 

Another thing that suggests itself to my mind is that all legislation 
looking toward Pharmacy should be directed by the Pharmacist. He 
best knows where the shoe pinches and surely is the more capable in 
framing laws to better serve his business; his common honesty is 
known of all men and he is more likely to direct along lines that will 
serve the people, certainly more capable of so doing than the average 
Legislator, who panders to the whims of certain men of prominence in 
his locality handling the voters that give him bis office. Looking over 
the laws passed during the life of our body, you will find compromise 
after compromise in securing each separate piece of legislation, often 
times by a piece of ignorance on the part of the lawmaker, getting some- 
thing entirely different than was asked for. If we take up these mat- 
ters, give them our attention, talk them, ask for them, assert our 
demands as other commercial bodies do, pressing always for what we 
want, the result will then be something. 

Our Board of Pharmacy should be a member of the National 
Association of Boards of Pharmacy. At the last meeting of this Asso- 
ciation in Denver, Colorado, 40 states were members, with ; associa- 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 4."> 

tions. North Carolina should be among the progressive ones, and I 
suggest that our Board join, and co-operate with that organization. 

The "Druggist's Home" at Palmyra, Wis., organized by the National 
Association of Drug Clerks, E. B. Heinstreet, Supt., is a home for 
aged, infim, or injured Druggists of any and all parts of our country. 
This Asociation of Drug Clerks organized the Home and purchased 
some 85 acres at Palmyra, Wis., is meeting with a pronounced success, 
and I heartily endorse the idea, and ask that our body show its sym- 
pathy with the movement, in any way you may deem best. 

My attention has been called to the movement by Mr. Geo. F. Payne 
of Georgia to the raising of the grade of Pharmacist in the Army 
Hospital Corps, elevating that individual to the corresponding grade 
that he now enjoys in the Navy Hospital Department, to write to the 
Secretary of War to incorporate a suggestion in his report to Con- 
gress, endorsing the Bacon-Hughe's Bill on this matter. You older 
members will no doubt remember that it was largely through this 
gentleman's influential work that the Pharmacists in the Navy was 
raised to his present commissioned grade. 

I am requested by Miss Anna B. Bagly of Columbus Ohio, Secretary 
to the Woman's section of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
which section was provided for at the last annual convention at Denver, 
to ask that I call attention to this section in my address, and urge our 
Lady members to join, and all the wives and Daughters of our male 
members of the American Pharmaceutical z\ssociation. I cordially do 
so and trust that our members of the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation will take their wives and daughters to the Nashville meeting 
this year and have them join, and I invite our Lady members to attend 
and become members, thereby increasing Pharmaceutical co-operation 
and dissemination of matters Pharmaceutical. 

I received a letter from Mr. J.j$. Goode of Asheville, N. C, under 
date of June 5, 1913, calling attention to an article in the Asheville 
Citizens of the formation of a local Branch of our State Association. 
Members in that city, which met on May roth, elected officers, and 
organized for the promotion of ethical Pharmacy, closer relationship 
between Drug Clerk and Physician, and the proper enforcement of the 
Pharmacy Laws. I strongly endorse this movement as being along 
proper lines and recommend that in every community where there is 
more than one store that this be done as it promotes a more helpful 
means of conduct of proper business relations, as well as better commu- 
nity spirit, and leads towards a healthful growth of our own body, as 
when the entire licensed Pharmacists become members of the State 
Association, better Laws, and a more congenial spirit will be manifest- 
ed. 

This Association with its thirty-four years of active History, in- 
corporated, respected, and recognized by Law as the Pharmaceutical 



46 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

body to whom the Board of Pharmacy shall report, out of which the 
Board grows and continues its work, has just cause to be proud of this 
body of Five as creditable, high-spirited, and progressive men, as it is 
the pride of any State to have, nor has any Law been placed on the 
Statute Books of the State save through its endorsement. They have 
not gotten what they asked for but did get what we have, and I think 
it no more than just that I mention this in my address to you. 

The position of the Druggist in the business and professional world 
is a peculiar one. Doing work which demands education and skill 
and required by Law to prepare himself for it, he is still recognized by 
the public as a professional man. No Druggist is ever publicly called in 
consultation by another, because of his greater professional ability. 
Xor does the public willingly pay him a professional fee. He is looked 
upon by the Physicians and the public as a skilled tradesman who is 
in a position to overcharge the public for his services. And yet he 
must employ men who have had like training to assist him in his 
business and must pay them as much as a Physician, Lawyer or Dentist 
would be paid were he hired by the year to work in the office of 
another. On the other hand, we have a feeling that we are more than 
tradesmen, and in a majority of cases this feeling is so strong that 
we neglect to get the training that is required for success in mer- 
chantile pursuits, and the most of us are small tradesmen. 

In some cases propoganda movements will succeed in bettering these 
conditions, especially in our relations with the Physicians, but it is 
also true that the amount of true Pharmaceutical work in many places 
is very small and other stores are allowed to sell so much merchandise 
that ought to belong to the Drug Store alone, that Druggists are com- 
pelled to compete with other stores on a purely commercial basis with- 
out the training of their competitors and yet are compelled to employ 
a higher priced clerk. 

It has occured to me that in some stores restricted articles might 
be placed under lock and key to be dispensed only by liscensed Pharma- 
cists, and the store allowed to be conducted in a commercial way dur- 
ing their absence. Whether this can be worked out under the Law. I 
am not prepared to say, but it seems to me that this idea might be 
embraced, improved upon, and allowed under the Law. 

In the meantime let us not forget to cultivate the professional side 
of our calling, looking ever forward to the time which we all hope for, 
when Pharmacy as a profession, shall come into its own. 

Let us encourage our clerks to get the best education possible, and 
while training them along commercial lines, hold up to them the higher 
professional ideals. 

I wish to thank you all for the many courtesies extended me during 
my official career with this Association, the many delightful personal 
acquaintances which has made our association so pleasant to me. I 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 47 

have been amply repaid by your kindly greetings and seeming personal 
regard. My membership began almost with the inception of the Asso- 
ciation, continued until I left the state for some 15 years. Upon my 
return I lost no time in reconnecting myself with it and after ten years 
of renewal you elevated me to this high office. I thank you one and 
all, and trust that I shall meet with you each succeeding year as they 
roll on, till I see each one of you here gray-haired old men. 

J. G. M. CORDON. 

The Chairman appointed E. V. Zoeller, J. E. Shell, and E. 
G. Birdsong as a committee on the President's Address. 

Chairman : We will next have the report of the Secretary. 

J. G. Beard: Your Secretary begs leave to submit the 
following report : 

Immediately after last year's adjournment all haste was made to 
edit the proceedings. This was rendered especially difficult because of 
the incompetency of the stenographer employed, who fa !ed to secure 
any notes whatsoever of the transactions and the Secretary was com- 
pelled to edit the minutes from limited notes in his own possession. 
Advertisements from manufacturers were solicited with the result 
that $448 in revenue was obtained. This amount exceeds by $258.00 
that of any previous year, and was sufficient to pay in full the expenses 
of publishing the proceedings and leave a surplus of $25.12. Because 
of inserting- photographs in the transactions and the enlarged size of 
the book, the total cost exceeded somewhat that of preceeding volumes. 
Copies were mailed to all members, the Secretary of all sister Associa- 
tions, to the Pharmaceutical Press and to all advertisers. The Secre- 
taries of other Associations and the Pharmaceutical Press reciprocated 
these courtesies. 

During the year just past your Secretary made many efforts to 
effect some means of increasing the attendance at meetings and en- 
larging the membership of the Association. He wrote various other 
secretaries for advice; requested suggestions from many prominent 
druggists in this body, but owing to the pressing demands of their 
business, the majority were unable to co-operate. It is earnestly re- 
commended that these subjects be deliberated upon at this meeting, 
since the success or failure of our association hinges in a large measure 
upon these two points. Though there has been an increase of 14 in the 
membership, from 248 to 262, still, this slight gain is disproportionate 
to the general advance in pharmaceutical conditions in North Carolina 
and should have been much larger. 






48 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

The varied duties of the Secretary have been carried out faithfully 
and conscientiously and the work for the year has been a great plea- 
sure. We are grateful and extend thanks to the proceedings' adver- 
tisers for their liberal patronage, and to all friends who assisted in 
carrying out the work of the office. 

The expenses of this office for the past year are as follows : 

400 copies proceedings $292.75 

400 envelopes 5.00 

Printing 10.50 

Postage 26.00 

Express 2.47 

Stationery 6.00 

phone messages .15 

Misc 5- 2 5 

Si cretary's salary 75-00 

Total $423.12 

Motion was made and carried that the Secretary's report 
be adopted and referred to the auditing committee. 

G. E. Burwell, the Treasurer, states that he will make his 
report at the afternoon session. 

The President appointed the following men as members of 
the Auditing Committee: C. B. Miller, E. L. Tarkington, 
and F. T. Smith. 

Secretary: Messrs. Merck and Company, offered a prize 
of $10.00 worth of their chemicals to be given in any way the 
Secretary saw fit. I thought it best to give the prize to the 
member that secured the largest number of new members. 

II. K. Grantham : We have a committee on membership. 
They could give some information on membership. They 
could give some information on that line. 

President: I will ask the committee for that report, and 
I think that will be a very good idea. 



Report of C. D. Sedberry: 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 49 

To the members of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association : 

The Committee on Membership Increase begs to report that a circu- 
lar letter, copy following this report, was mailed to each registered 
druggist in the State, writing those not already members to join at this 
meeting. 

In accordance with a resolution adopted at Waynesville, we have 
considered various plans suggested for increasing the association's 
membership and recommend that some arrangement be made for a 
canvass of the state by a Field Secretary. We suggest that the Asso- 
ciation authorize the Treasurer to pay the Field Secretary a part of 
the initiation fee as compensation for each new member secured. 
Respectfully Submitted, 

W. W. HORNE, 
C. D. SEDBERRY, 
J. G. M. CORDON. 

Fayetteville, North Carolina, 
Tune 2, 1913. 
To the Pharmacists of North Carolina : 

On the eve of the Thirty-fourth Annual Meeting to be held at New 
Bern, June nth to 13th, we beg to urge upon the pharmacists- of the 
State the vital need for a substantial increase in our membership. 

A larger and stronger organization is necessary that the Association 
may become a more effective guardian and champion of your welfare. 
Without this we can never secure the results, legislative and commer- 
cial, to which we are entitled. 

We Must Unify and Strengthen Our Organization. 
The New Bern meeting will consider plans for the employment of a 
Field Secretary to have active charge of a boosting campaign. If a 
large number of new members is secured the Association can afford 
greater efforts to bring about a closer relationship between the pharma- 
ceutical interests of our State. 

The Association has been formed for the best interests of all and 
it needs your support and encouragement. If not already a member 
see that your application is presented at the New Bern meeting. 
Show Your Loyalty and Your Good Business Judgement. 
Let those who are members keep the good work going. Go out 
among your neighbors and get them on the march to the New Bern 
meeting. 

Questions vitally important to the retail drug trade will come up for 
discussion and decision. Yen- respectfully, 

W. W. HORNE, 
C. D. SEDBERRY, 
J. G M. CORDON. 
4 Committee. 



50 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

There was no report from the delegates to the American 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

The Report of Secretary and Treasurer of the North Caro- 
lina Board of Pharmacy, Mr. F. W. Hancock was called for. 
This report may be found in the back of the Proceedings to- 
gether with other state board matters. 

President : I will refer the report of the Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Board of Pharmacy to the Auditing Com- 
mittee. 

( '. 1 >. Beadham: I make a motion that as several new 
members are here who want to join I think it best that we 
elect them now. They are as follows: 

Chas. <T. O'H. Eorne, Greenville; Oaney Foster, Enfield; 
J. V. Loftin, Troy; Ernest E. Murchison, Clinton: Hugh A. 
Barnes. Maxton; W. R Nowell, Wendell. 

As Mr. John Henderson of Hickory made the highest 
mark before the board, he gets the li<';il prize of a membership 
in the association. 

H. K. Grantham: I make a motion that the members 
whose names have just been read be admitted to membership 
in the Association, and that the Secretary pass the vote of 
the association for them as a whole. 

The Chair declares them elected. 

The next order of business called for by the President 
was the reading and consideration of Papers. 

The chairman of the Committee on Papers and Queries, E. 
V. Howell, said : 

I wish to say that I wrote two letters stating that I could 
not serve as chairman on this committee, but received no an- 
wer to those letters, and, therefore, thinking perhaps they 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 51 

would require me to serve, I prepared a short paper report. 
I would first like to read a little sketch of Samuel Johnston 
Hinsdale, which is as follows : 



Samuel Johnston Hinsdale, born at Middletown, Conn., March 26th, 
1817, died June 14th, 1894 in Fayetteville, N. C, son of John Theodore 
and Harriett Johnston Hinsdale, educated in Connecticutt, graduated 
from New York College of Pharmacy in 1837, settled in Fayetteville 
1843 and established the first drug store in that town, which was for 
many years the leading establishment of its kind in the state, and where 
several of the best pharmacists in the state were educated. 

His chemical knowledge was of use to the Confederate Government 
and he superintended in the manufacture of percussion caps and other 
chemical explosives. 

After his retirement in 1885, he was engaged in experimental chemis- 
try for his own amusement and for the benefit of science, and was at 
one time President of the Pharmaceutical Association of North Caro- 
lina, and a member of the National Association whose meetings he 
attended. 

S. J. Hinsdale was a charter member of this Association. He was 
the first Vice-President 1880-81. He acted as delegate to the 28th 
annual meeting of the American Pharmaceutical Asociation at Sara- 
toga Springs, September 14th, 1880. He called together the first meet- 
ing of this Association and nominated E. M. Nadal of Wilson as tem- 
porary chairman ; read the first paper on the program of this Associa- 
tion, the title of this paper being "The Drug Business in Connecticutt in 

1831." 

He was President of the second annual meeting 1881-82. His name 
was one of the six in the Pharmacy Act in 1881. With William Simp- 
son he made the report of the delegates to the American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association. At the i88r meeting, Mr. Hinsdale exhibited an 
apparatus for rapid filtration by hydraulic pressure, a tube for washing 
precipitates, and water apparatus for facilitating labratory experiments. 

It was at his suggestion that Professor P. W. Bedford of New York, 
was made an honorary member of this Association. His report as 
Chairman of the Committee on Papers and Queries was a paper on 
certain chemical tests for Alkaloids for determining Glucose, and sug- 
gestions for the preparation of an antidote for arsenic. At the meet- 
ing in 1882, Mr. Hinsdale read a paper on Staples Process of assaying 
Laudnum, reporting four assays made. The report showed samples 
one and two sold by grocery stores to be of one half the strength 
directed by the Pharmacopoea. At the banquet tendered the druggists 
by the druggists of Winston-Salem, Mr. Hinsdale responded to the 
toast, "The Retiring President." 



52 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

At the fifth annual meeting held at Charlotte, Mr. Hinsdale was 
again appointed as a delegate to the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion and to the National Retail Druggists Association. 

At the sixth annual meeting in 1885, he contributed a paper on "Color 
Tests For Strychnine." Upon his invitation, Fayetteville was selected 
as a place for the meeting in 1886. He was a delegate to the American 
Pharmaceutical Association 1887- 1888- 1890. 

At the ninth annual meeting, 1888, he presented a paper on a colori- 
metric method for estimating morphine and tannin, and another on 
tannin in tea, nutgalls and some other vegatable substances. His 
paper included a perfomance of the test to an interested and appre- 
ciative audience. Another paper he presented was a colorimetric method 
for estimating the morphine strength of Iaudnum and other prepara- 
tions of opium. In 1890 he discontinued his drug business in Fayette- 
ville. Later he was appointed a delegate to the section on Materia 
Medica and Pharmacy of the American Medical Association, which 
met in Detroit June 6th, 1892. 

Before our own Association he presented a paper on "The Method of 
Manipulation in Determining Tannin in Barks, etc., by Precipitation 
with Gelatine. *' For four successive years lie was Chairman of your 
Committee on Drug Adulterations. He was elected as a delegate to 
the Sixth International Pharmaceutical Association which met at 
Chicago, August 28th, 1893. His last paper before our Association 
was in 1888 on "An Upright Condenser with Cut of the Apparatus." 

( '. I). Bradham begged leave to interrupt for a minute and 
said: 

Gentlemen and ladies in the Association : We want to know 
if you will go on a boat trip this afternoon up the river. The 
Captain of the vessel is waiting for an answer, but if you 
think it will be too cold, we will postpone the trip until to- 
morrow, as we do not want to go until the whole membership 
can turn out. 

P. W. Vaughan: Would it be comfortable on the boat 
inside. 

( '. D. Bradham : There is no inside to this boat. 

P. W. Vatjghan : Well 1 move that we don't go, as I am 
nor accustomed to swinging on the outside. 



Kovtli Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 53 

C. P. Harper : I suggest that we get a rising vote from all 
the members of the Association (which was done ami the 1" »ar 
ride postpone'!, as the member- seemed to think it was en- 
tirely too cold). 

A report was made by F. H. Limn, who had made some 
analysis of tea- and coffees. 

E. V. Howell : I have a paper here pertaining to the ( livil 
War. There was do Red Cross Society, in the beginning. 

Jackson at Winchester, made the first effort to consider 
nurses and physicians as non-combatants. An effort by Dr. 

Gardner, of New York, in a meeting of the American Medi- 
cal Association at Chicago, to have medicine and surgical 
supplies excluded from the list of contraband of war articles 
was unfavorably received and tabled indefinitely. When 
medicines, by reason of the blockade, became unobtainable, 
the following list of indigenous drugs was sent out from 
Richmond. Much light will be thrown on the question of 
disease and the death rate in Southern prisons by thi- ex- 
hibit of the lack of medicines. The list is copied from the 
complete file of the Confederate States Medical and Surgical 
Journal at the University. There are three copies only in 
existence. 

(See Appendix. I 

The last paper 1 have is a very short one on Formaldehyde 
and Permanganate as a Disinfectant. Perhaps some of yon 
recall a very serious injury in this state where this exploded 
with a very disastrous result to one of our citizens. From a 
series of experiments I find that the fumes from this formal- 
dehyde disinfection did not kill the disease germs used. I 
think terminal disinfection should be emphasized and fear 
there is danger in considering formaldehyde room disinfec- 
tion as all-sufficient. 

President Cordox : I think Dr. Howell is bringing some- 



54: North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

thing interesting here. I am sure some of you are present 
that have an interest in the disinfection matter. It is an edu- 
cation to us to know what you are doing, Dr. Howell, and it 
is true, these papers ought to be discussed. That is the thing 
we all ought to know, if any of you have any ideas along that 
line, we would like to know what they are and like to hear 
from yon. That is part of my work in Virginia, calling on 
people who are using disinfectants and selling them. 

Mr. Eugene Rimmer of Tarboro presented a paper on 
"Some suggestions to increase interest in the sale of Disinfec- 
tants." 

{See . I ppendi 

Mr. E. L. Tarkington of Wilson read a very inter taining 
paper. His subject was "Some of the Beauties of Pharmacy 
and the Relation of the Pharmacist and Physician." 

(See Appendix, i 

Mr. R. H. Roth of Asheville mailed a paper to the Secre- 
tary to be read at the meeting. The title of this paper was 
"The. Store Label and Nomenclature of Pharmaceutical Pre- 
parations." 

( See Appendix. 

The following communications were read by the Secretary: 

Raleigh. N. C, June n 1913. 
/. G. Beard. Newbern, N. C: 

I wish to extend you in behalf of the Chamber of Commerce and 
citizens of Raleigh a most cordial invitation to hold your nineteen 
fourteen annual meeting in Raleigh. We offer best hotel accommoda- 
tions, railroad facilities with fifty passenger trains daily — auditorium 
and halls for general and committee meetings. 

J no. C. Dkewrv, 
President Chamber of Commerce of Raleigh. 



Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 55 

Thomasville. N. C, June n-13, 1913- 
/. G. Beard, Secretary, 

Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
Newbern, N. C. : 
Sorry I cannot be with you, however I assure you I am deeply inter- 
ested in every movement for the upbuilding of the profession of phar- 
macy. With sincerest wishes for a most successful meeting. 

Reese C. Harville. 

Wilmington, N. C, June 12, 1913. 
7. G. M. Cordon, 

Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
Newbern, N. C. : 
Sorry I cannot be with you. Greetings to all. 

NlESTUE. 

Morganton, N. C, June 11, 1913- 
Secretary, Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, 
Newbern, N. C. : 
Regret our inability to attend meeting. Wishing you a most plea- 
sant meeting. 

H. F. Cable, 
Sprague Silver, 
W. A. Leslie. 

Pittsboro, N. C, June 12, 1913. 
Mr. G. E. Burwell, 

Newbern. N. C. : 
My Dear Sir : 

It was my intention of being with you at the meeting at Newbern, 
but circumstances prevented. Although absent my hearts is with you. 
I enclose check for $2.co for dues. Hoping you will have a pleasant 
and profitable meeting. 

My regards to the Association, I am, 

Fraternally, 

G. R. PlLKINTON. 

C. B. Miller: I know a great many druggists who buy 
Rock Candy Syrup by the barrel, when with just a little 
trouble they can take a percolator that will supply them with 
all the heavy syrup they can use. This percolator will cost 
you 85 cents. I believe there are some on the market that 



56 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

will cost. $15.00 — one that will supply a man with all the 
svrup he wants. If von will take a five gallon keg, or a 
Pepsi Cola keg and remove the first two hoops, this will en- 
a'ble yon to take the head out whole; take that head and bore 
it full of anger holes, then take a five gallon can — you can 
buy one for 50 cents — take off the jacket, carry it to the tin 
shop and have the tinner remove the bottom to the can. Then 
you have the can ready to put into your keg. Yon will want 
in bore ;i hole in the bottom of your keg and put in a small 
molasses gig, which will cost about 25 cent-. Drop that tin 
can in the keg. take the wooden head and drop it down into 
the keg — then take one-half pound absorbent cotton and lay 
that over the wooden head, and tuck it around the edges on 
the inside, so the sugar won't seep through. Take the tin 
that came out of the bottom of the can and drive that full 
of holes — this gives you a sieve, put that on top of your 
cotton — then yon have a percolator that costs you aboul 85 
cents that will do a- much good ;is the $15.00 percolators 
will do. 

Yen then pour in your sugar and water — it will hold 
probably 25 or 30 pound- of sugar. Some of yon be sure 
and try this. 

Delegate: What will be the cost per gallon to make the 
syrup that way \ 

Mileee: You can buy sugar for -Co cent- per pound. T 
think it will cost you about 35 cents per gallon for that 
syrup, whereas Rock Candy Syrup will cost you 48 cents 
per gallon. 

.V few days ago I noticed in the store a pound of granu- 
lated or ground Hydrastis. It was evidently ordered for 
someone who never came after it. It was in good shape. I 
took it and made a pound or nearly a pound of fluid extract 
out of it, and saved the Hydrastis, and also saved myself 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 57 

$10.00 besides. That fluid extract is worth $15.00 per 
pound. Von can make a fluid extract out of most any drug- 
that has not lost its strength. Convert it into fluid extract 
when you have no demand for it. 

Now I throw those things out for what they are worth. T 
think gentlemen if all of us entered into a discussion of these 
things more and more, the Association would become more 
interesting. We can all learn something from each other, 
and these meetings will be far more profitable, if we will 
practice more of that. 

E. L. Tarkixgtox : I would like to make a motion that 
the Committee on Papers and Queries submit a li<t of pa- 
pers for the members to select from before our next meeting.- 
No doubt but what some member should like To write some- 
thing. Every pharmacist has his ideas and can lend a help- 
ing hand and if he only can do that much, it will be a great 
help. (Referred to Committee on Papers and Queries.) 

I would like also to make a motion that $10.00 in gold be 
awarded each year as a prize for the best paper. If the phar- 
macist could not possibly attend, he could send his paper 
and it could be read at the meeting. (Considered but no 

action taken.) 

E. V. Howell : I want to call attention to a paper by 
Mr. Xeistle, of Wilmington, who has so kindly sent us the 
Venus Ely Trap. His interest in this plant is due to the 
fact that the plant itself is of extreme interest. 

The President asked Mr. Tarkington to renew his motion : 

Tarkixgtox : It was that the Committee on Papers and 
Queries solicit papers for next meeting, as they will have 
plenty of time between now and the next meeting — that the 
Committee get up 25 subjects. They could mail them to the 
members of the Pharmaceutical Association between now and 



58 North ( 'art >1 ina Pharmaceutical Association 

H»14. and if a member cared to take up a subject he could 
do so. 

( '. D. Bradham: Possibly Tarkington is on the right 
track, but it has occurred to me from the number of meetings 
I have attended and other meetings that we are not on the 
right road to get a free discussion on points that are of inter- 
est to the retail druggists. The prime object of the meetings 
of the Pharmaceutical Association of this State, or any 
other State, should be to advance the interest of the pharma- 
cists, but practically to advance the interest of the retail 
druggists. It occiii'-; fco me we are on the wrong road. x^o 
matter how many queries or subjects we have up for discus- 
sion, unless they are led by some party who is familiar with 
the subjects, we will never get the men in attendance to take 
interest in the subjects. I attended a meeting the other clay 
of the S.A.L. Medical Society and I was intensely interested. 
They had a section of ■•Surgery" and a section of "Medicine" 
and something else for their particular pleasure. They have 
a reader for each section, and that reader read a paper and 
ir was discussed by every member present. I think if such 
a rhing could be instituted by the Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion of North Carolina it would bring a great many more to 
our meetings than we have now. 

Suppose a member of our Association was appointed 
to prepare and read a paper on ''Pharmacy," another 
on "Chemistry." another on "Botany," that does not 
interfere with any paper or any discussion anyone would 
wish to bring up here. If we would have sections 
I think it would be of great interest to the drug- 
and would bring out some fighting blood we have 
never seen on this floor. We are a dead bunch; I want to 
say that with all due respect to you gentlemen. I am a 
retail druggist. I occupy a very delicate position. I didn't 
come here to get up a fuss with you gentlemen. I came here 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 59 

only for the advancement of interest of the Pharmaceutical 
Association. We could bring about some interest in this 
Association and people would come to hear what was going 
to be said. If you members had only been to that Seaboard 
Medical Association it would have opened your eyes. They 
would tell what they would do in that particular instance and 
how they managed such and such a thing. Just as long as 
queries and papers are submitted, just so long will they read 
it and chuck it in the waste basket. I know I have done it 
for twenty years. I want to submit this for your considera- 
tion. I believe it will create interest in this Association, 
and make us better druggists and we will go home with a 
better understanding of what other people are doing. (Ap- 
plause.) 

E. A. Turlington: I heartily agree with Mr. Bradham 
on that subject. We have in Wilson an association of medical 
men. I notice they have their meetings and have papers read 
by a man on a certain subject and they discuss that — every 
doctor will discuss that particular subject, and make it in- 
teresting. I also wish to refer to Mr. Tarkington's sug- 
gestion. I think the druggists of each town, or county, 
should have something of that kind. If we did that at home 
and have discussions among ourselves, it would not be so 
hard when we attend the State Association. As Mr. Brad- 
ham says, if we have men to read papers on different sub- 
jects, Materia Medica, Chemistry and Pharmacy, then let 
us all discuss what we do in our store, this will no doubt 
create an interest that will bring more members to our Asso- 
ciation and that is what we want, 

W. II. Weaen : Returning to Mr. Miller's talk as to find- 
ing a package of Hydrastis of some age, and having made a 
fluid extract from it. 

Most all drugs loose a percentage value of their alkaloid 
on a continued age. I think it would be in order to assay 



60 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

the fluid extract; otherwise the finished product would he 
of questionable standard. 

( '. I!. Miller: Tt does not pay a druggist to make the 
fluid extract when he can buy it assayed very much cheaper, 
but where lie has these medicines on hand, it does pay him 
to make them wherever he can. 

Delegate: Was it in a package or bottle? 

( '. I!. Miller: I kept it in a glass jar. 

W. 11. Wearn: We arc a body of men. elevating our- 
selves to the higher standard of profession. We must be 
progressive. If we go to the physicians of North Carolina 
and tell them we are handling the CJ. S. 1'. products, we 
must see that those products that we handle are analyzed if 
made by us. The 1'. S. P. l*olds the pharmacists of today 
responsible from the moment he removes the cork from the 
bottle. As soon as we, the North Carolina pharma< 
show the physicians we are looking after the product- we 
make ourselves — we then let them know we are -ticking to 
handling pure drug-. We can't afford to turn our drugs 
that are uncertainties. 

iC P. Greyer: That leads me to say the State is very de- 
ficient in drug inspection. I have frequently found it almosl 
impossible to buy drug- of efficient standard in the State of 
Xorth Carolina. You have to depend upon your own analy- 
sis to see whether they are of efficient strength or not. The 
State has never appropriated anything for the Food and 
Drugs Act. There are certain classes of drugs loaded into 
North Carolina from other states labelled according to the 
Pharmacopeia but when they are shipped into North Caro- 
lina you have no insurance that they are I T . S. P. strength. 
I have a record of a good many drugs brought into North 
Carolina that show they are deficient. For instance you take 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 61 

powdered opium. I have a sample of opium that shows adul- 
teration. 

Rhubarb is another one that has been manipulated, and 
numerous other drugs that are sold are of inferior strength. 
Ir seems to me that it is time for this Association to make a 
pressing demand upon the State and Legislature to get some 
money whereby we could enforce the law and have a Drug 
Inspector in the State. 

W. H. Wearn: The point I wish to make has nothing 
personal whatever in it. My point is simply that the U. S. 
P. has been advancing to higher standards. The first prep- 
aration standardized was Tincture of Xux Vomica, which 
was required to assay 2 per cent, of the solid extract. The 
next was to make from a 2 per cent, solid extract its prep- 
arations of Xux Vomica, assaying L5 per cent, combined 
alkaloids. Finally our present Tincture i- required to be 
made from and to contain. 2 per cent extract of Xux Vomica, 
assaying 5 per cent. Strychnine Alkaloid. Yon see that it 
has been advancing its preparations all the time to higher 
standards. So my object for arising here is to impress upon 
the members the importance of performing their duty. Not 
that the druggists are not capable of doing it. hut there i> a 
possibility of their not doing it. We are responsible just as 
soon as we remove the cap from the bottle. We cannot take 
the manufacturer's word for it that it is U. S. P. strength. 
If we do. we have failed in our duty, just as much so as if 
we omitted the warm water in the first instance and used 
cold water and other directions. 

P. W. Vauoiiax: That is all right. I don't think there 
i- any druggist in the State who standardizes his paregoric or 
anything else, but it is absolutely necessary that that he 
done, but you may take the opium of certain strength — the 
result may not he the same everytime. In regard to the 



62 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

question of adulteration, in regard to the State making ex- 
amination of certain things sold in the State, I notice the 
Department of Agriculture recently published a pamphlet 
reporting analyses made in this State. A good many 
things are being sold according to that pamphlet, but against 
the law. One of those things was the question, of sweet oil. 
We have been dispensing for years what is called Union 
salad oil, and putting sweet oil label on it. That is noth- 
ing buj cotton seed oil, and it is called sweet oil. 

Now in order to dispense an oil and call it sweet oil, the 
department has ruled that it must be pure olive oil. We 
cannot label cotton seed oil, sweet oil. 

Delegate: That is the United States Law, and our law 
is based on that law. 

W. IT. Wearx: What 1 want to impress upon this body 
is that the minute they remove the stopper from any bottle 
or package they are responsible for that package. We have 
the proper enforcement of pure food and drugs act by the 
United States and North Carolina, both fixing upon the dis- 
penser the responsibility after the seal is broken. As it now 
stands it is a personal responsibility that he occupies to the 
physican whose- prescriptions he dispenses, to whom he sells 
his drugs, and the patients he sells it to. The quicker he 
rises to that responsibility the quicker the physician will 
recognize him. 

President: You all are discussing a subject that has 
not been properly brought up. I have allowed it to go until 

ir has reached this point. 

Motion of Mr. Tarkington seconded. 

• H. K. Grantham: The incoming President appoints 
that Committee and he does not have time to appoint that 
Committee before this session adjourns. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 63 

P. W. Vaughax : The motion before the house is that 
these subjects be sent out between now and next meeting. 

C. D. Beadham : I don't want to insist on my idea of 
having the papers and queries divided up among three or 
four sub-divisions to handle the papers. The point is : an 
individual to reach one of these sections. If we 
could modify Mr. Tarkington's motion to have the papers 
and queries divided up among three individuals selected on 
account of their qualifications, they could lead the discussion 
on these papers, and write the papers themselves. 
For instance Mr. E. V. Zoeller would be the leader on 
the pharmacy subject — all those papers would be turned 
over to him, he would be expected to write a paper himself 
and he reads that paper and all the balance of papers, and 
leads the discussion. If you expect every druggist of North 
Carolina to select one and write a paper on that subject you 
will get three or four papers from so and so — that is the end 
of your papers. Now that is the way it seems to me. I be- 
lieve you will get some results if you do as I suggested. 

W. II. Weaen: I think Mr. Bradham's motion is en- 
tirely right. I have served quite a number of times 
and tried various ways of getting responses to differ- 
ent subjects, such as getting up a list and writing individual 
letters to various persons who I thought were qualified, with 
not much more effect than if they had been through the regu- 
lar channel. Such selection- coming through the President, 
who is the head of the Association causes every man that 
loves the Association to feel that he has a duty to perforin 
if he is loyal to his Association, and no true man can afford 
not to be loyal. No true man or loyal member of the 
North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association can hold ani- 
mosity against a brother because he holds a different 
opinion. This is the spirit that will hold any As- 



64 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

sociation together. As I say, if this idea of Mr. Bradham's, 
which I think is a capable one, is acted upon it will result in 
something hotter than any we have ever had. 

E. L. Tai;ki \<.t<>\- : I think every member of the Asso- 
ciation should have the privilege of writing a paper, and not 
leaving it to any individual. A lot of druggists would write 
a paper it you would give them the privilege of doing it, 
and furnish fchem with a list. 

E. V. IIuwki.i. : In order to incorporate these two ideas, I 
suggest that the committee use the best efforts in arranging 
the program of the next meeting. Submit 25 questions for dis- 
cussion, which the leaders will arrange under appropriate 
heads, and if it is practical to put this scheme in operation 
at the next time. 1 suggest that they get busy at once and 
the President he requested to appoint the Committee on 
Queries and Papers a- his first Committee. 

J. E. Siikll: Take the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation. They have more paper- each year, hut Bradham's 
idea will systematize things. Our work is not harmon- 
ious. I think we should get ihi- settled at one* — get Brad- 
ham's idea into working order. 

President: The motion of Air. Tarkington is carried. 
i- carried. 

Treasurer: T am sure everyone present wants to take a 
pai't in the selection of officers, and your dues have to be 
paid before yon can vote and if you have not paid them 
T want to ask that you pay at once. 

Adjournment was taken until 3 p. m. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 65 

FOURTH SESSIOX 
Thursday Afternoon, June 12, 3 P. M. 

Meeting called to order by President J. G. M. Cordon. 
Roll call. 

The following new names were added for membership: 

Claude Smith, Durham, X. C. ; O. H. Lyon, Washington, 
N". C. ; Lee Davenport. Washington. X. C, Grover B. Wal- 
ton, Washington, 1ST. C. 

Peesidhxt : Xo member is entitled to a vote unless his 
dues are paid in full. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 
PRESIDENT 

F. W. Hancock: I take pleasure in nominating C. P. 
Harper of Sehna, X. C. for the position of President. 

Seconded. 

Secretary cast flic vote of the Association in the affirma- 
tive for C. P. Harper as the President of the X. C. Pharma- 
ceutical Association for the ensuing year. 

President Cordon: I therefore declare Mr. Harper 
President of the Association for next year. 

first vtce-presidext 
J. E. Shell: 1 would like to place in nomination Geo. 
C. Goodman of Alooresville who is in line for the position. 

Seconded by G. E. Burwell. 

President: It has always been the rule that whenever 
the next in line is absent he cannot stand in line for being 

elected. 
5 



66 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

G. E. Bubwell : Mr. Goodman is very sick at his home. 
He is unable to leave the house, and I would like to explain 
why he is not here. We would all be glad to see him here. 

It was moved and seconded that the Secretary cast a vote 
in the affirmative for Mr. Geo. C. Goodman as First Vice- 
President. 

President: I now declare him elected as First Vice- 
President. 

SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT 

C. B. Miller : I place in nomination for Second Vice- 
President the name of F. L. Tarkington. of Wilson. Sec- 
onded. Vote cast by Secretary. 

President: I therefore declare him elected Second Vice- 
President for the ensuing year. 

THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT 

W. M. Yearby : T wish to place in nomination for this 
position E. G. Birdsong, of Raleigh. Secretary cast a vote 
in the affirmative for Mr. Birdsong for this position. 

President: I therefore declare Mr. E. G. Birdsong 
elected Third Vice-President for the ensuing year. 

SECRETARY 

W. H. Horne : I would like to nominate for the po- 
sition of Secretary our present Secretary. J. G. Beard. 

Seconded. 

It was moved that the Treasurer cast the entire vote of 
the Association for the present Secretary J. G. Beard and 
that he be reappointed as Secretary for the ensuing year. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 67 

TREASURER 

G. K. Grantham : I take pleasure in nominating for 
Treasurer the man who now holds the bag and collects the 
back clues, the present Treasurer, G. E. Burwell. 

Seconded. 

It was moved and seconded that the Secretary cast the vote 
of the entire Association for Mr. G. E. Burwell as Treasurer 
of the Association for the coming year. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The following were elected as the Executive Commit- 
tee by ballot: 

( !. D. Sedberry, Chairman. Fayetteville, X. C. ; C. P. 
Greyer, Morganton, 1ST. C. ; J. F. Cole. Carthage. N. C. ; B. 
M. Brame, North Wilkesbpro, X. C. with J. G. Beard ex- 

officio. Chapel Hill. X. C. 

MEMBER BOARD OF PHARMA< V 

John Steadman McDonald, of Raleigh, was nominated by 
Mr. Hicks, of Raleigh. 

C. D. Bradham : Mr. President and Gentlemen of the 
Association: — T am not prejudiced against any one individ- 
ual, neither have I any desire to have it appear that I am 
friendly to any particular individual, but as I stated to you 
at Morehead City, the Pharmaceutical Association of Xorth 
Carolina in the election of a Board of Pharmacy should 
represent the licensed druggists of Xorth Carolina, and not 
the few men who possibly might be present. I stated it was 
disadvantageous to change the executive head of the Board 
of Pharmacy. I gave you an illustration of the work I 
thought had been done by that head, consisting of Zoeller 
and Hancock. T want to report today that during the years 



68 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

I was a member of the Board of Pharmacy in this State 
with my association with these two gentlemen, those men 
represented the pharmacists of North Carolina, the registered 
men of North Carolina, and not the proprietors of the stores 
particularly. T mean this, that without fear or favor, with- 
out recourse, bull-dog means or methods, the pharmacy law 
so far as possible was enforced. 

.Mr. Hancock came down one day ami said: "I find 
such and such a man out of town and his store is in charge 
of an unregistered man." He was supposed to lake official 
action and bring a suit against those people or have them in- 
dicted — the board would back him in that. 1 said: "This 
is v r ery embarrassing to mo. this man is a friend of mine — his 
wife is sick, and he is sick ami gone out of town. Let him 
alone, and a- soon as he conic- back I will get him to have a 
registered man." I got Hancock out of town by the skin or 
my teeth, and as soon as this man returned I told him he 
must get a registered man. and he said "I will do that."' In 
a few weeks Mr. Hancock came down and he said: "I 
found a man at Kinston, X. ('.. without a registered num. 
and I have in my hand some poison tablets that I got the 
porter at the hotel to buy for me. T have a great mind to 
have him indicted." That store today is going in the name 
of Lenoir Drug Co.. and a very fine drug company it is. 

I keep Two registered men in my store all the time, hut \ 
have it to do. because Mr. Hancock makes me do it. I hereby 
nominate him for this position. I know that Mr. Hancock 
makes mistake-, and every man makes mistakes. He is a 
friend of the drug clerks. Tt is through his influence 
that we men are getting as much money out of the drug busi- 
ness as clerks today. 

What are the licensed men going to say if we kick Frank 
Hancock out? We are approaching a [dace where we must 
be very careful in regard to what we are going to do and what 
we do. You will find that the Legislature will get on top 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 69 

of you. Now if the day comes that the proprietors of the 
stores of North Carolina can get that Board of Pharmacy 
in their ha nils so they can admit people by reciprocal regis- 
tration then I will hire you for $35.00 per month. I am not 
opposed to Mr. McDonald, but I am opposed to turning down 
the chief executive of the Board of Pharmacy. I am afraid 
we will make a mistake if we do it. I am conscientious in it, 
and I am not opposed to any man you put in there. We 
should take this matter seriously and reflect before we do 
make a mistake. 

W. H. Weakk : I wish to place in. nomination J. E. Shell. 
of Lenoir, X. C. 

In doing this I have no word of condemnation to offer in 
reference to F. W. Hancock. A man to do this would be just 
as silly to say the sun didn't cast its light. In doing this, I 
don't wish to charge Mr. Hancock with any unloyalty, any 
neglect in discharging his duty. There has been no more 
faithful man than Frank ^X. Hancock, but on the ground that 
the last national Democratic convention took a short time 
ago in changing the politics of the United States, declaring 
for one term, six years for the President. It stands pledged 
today to enact this into law if it performs its pledge. 

The great State of North Carolina has today such a 
law that the Chief Executive of North Carolina shall be 
governor for one term. We all know the life of any organiza- 
tion depends largely upon the effusion of new blood. By 
this method we can train young men into proficiency. The 
man whose name I have presented to this Association is the 
man who I have met at its meetings continually for nearly 
a quarter of a century — he has come from the west to the 
extreme east most of the time. 

The Association has recognized him as a man of ability 
in its ranks by placing him during his term of membership 



70 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

— brought him up from the member of the Executive Board 
to the Third Vice-President, Second Vice-President and to 
the President's chair of our Associatiou. His abil- 
ity could hardly be questioned, and in recognizing his 
ability and his loyalty to the Association, a man is presented 
to you who is not a stranger but will ask that you give him 
due consideration as a member of the Association. I hope 
you will support Mr. Shell. 

Dn. Duffy : Whenever you lower the standard of an 
organization you have lessened its efficiency. I am not 
speaking in be'half of Mr. Hancock, neither am I speaking 
against any other candidate, but I say it would be far better 
for the Association of druggists throughout the State to let 
the Board remain a- it is than discbarge a faithful officer. 

He is better qualified today than when he first went into 
the office. If turn about is fair piny that might seem very 
nice, but it is not for one man or one individual that we 
should care for, and it is not the druggist but the people at 
large. The proprietor it is true owns the drug store, but the 
people help run the machinery and the proprietors and clerks 
both run the place. 

I would like for everyone presenl not to vote for a friend, 
or because some friend wants them to vote for him, but 
vote for the good of the Association, and for the good of the 
people, and not to be actuated by any other thought. Do 
what you think is right. 

E. L. Tarkington : I wish to second Mr. Bradham's mo- 
tion. 

E. A. Turlington: I wish to second Mr. Wearn's mo- 
tion. 

Fot;i» S. Worthy: Four or five years ago I had occasion 
to write Hancock about violations in my town, or rather he 
took the matter up with me. He came there, we went through 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 71 

the matter thoroughly and found a druggist had been violat- 
ing the Pharmacy Law, and he went to work and prosecuted 
him. The gentleman appealed to the Superior Court. Mr. 
Hancock's purpose was to try to get this man to live within 
the laAv. The result was that we took a nol-pros in the 
case, and it brought about good conditions in my town. 

Jonx Speague: 1 would like to second the nomination 
of McDonald. He is a young man. who deserves this po- 
sition, because he won it before the Board of Pharmacy. This 
age is one of progress and one of change. If I understand 
correctly Hancock has been on the Board twenty-odd years, 
and a younger man ought to take his place from our view- 
point, and I heartily second that Mr. McDonald be given 
this position. 

C. B. Miller: When the Congressional Convention met 
in Goldsboro to nominate our present Coroner, Dr. John M. 
Faison, an old farmer sat back in the end after every vote 
had been cast, who rose up and said : "I move that they make 
the nomination of Dr. Faison unanimous." He didn't nomi- 
nate anyone. I feel like if there is any candidate who has 
come before this body for re-election wdiose nomination should 
be made unanimous it is F. W. Hancock. I had the pleas- 
ure of serving on this board with him for seven years, and 
I have been intimate with the workings of that Board and his 
work for as many years more, and I say to you without the 
fear of contradiction, I don't believe that there is a man in 
this Association today who can fill that place as well as he. 
Not because you have not the ability, but because you have 
not the experience. Why. did the State of Xorth Carolina 
send back to the United States Senate Matt. W. Ransom and 
Ze'b. Vance until they died — -(applause) — because they were 
able to deliver the goods. They had the experience back of 
them, and they continued to send them there. Rotation in 
office is all right. I agree with the gentlemen who advocated 



72 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

that, but when you have a man there that fills the bill keep 
him there. Why do you want to change? This is no time 
for a change. You all know that the Legislature that con- 
vene- in Raleigh i< more strict upon the druggists every year. 
We need a man to stand at the doors of the Legislature to 
prevent these acts. A man put on this Board now, and a 
change made would ruin the life of this organization. It 
takes a man of experience to handle the Legislature; it takes 
a man of wisdom and a man that knows the people and knows 
how to go at it, His hands would be tied if you put a new 
man there. They confer with the Secretary of that Board 
and he confers with them. It takes a man of years, of ex- 
perience, and wisdom to fill that position. We have a man 
now who tills the bill— let- keep him there. 

Votes were taken and they wcvr cast a- follows: 
Hancock, 39 votes; McDonald, 19 votes; Shell. 8 votes. 

President: I now declare Mr. F. W. Hancock a member 
of the Board of Pharmacy. 

J. E. Shell: I move that we make that a unanimous vote. 
(Carried.) 

F. W. Ham (». k: Mr. President and Gentlemen of the 
North Carolina Pharmacy: — I assure you I appreciate from 
the very bottom of my heart that confidence which you have 
once more placed in me. I know that I am but human, and 
as some of the members of this Association have said. I have 
made mistakes. That is true, but the mistakes I have made 
were mistakes of the head and not of the heart, I assure you 
if there is any man in this house, or in this State that has this 
Association any nearer and dearer to his heart than I have, 
I would like to see him. 

I sincerely thank you for this honor, and I assure you that 
I will do all within my power for your good, and I ask you to 
co-operate with me in carrying forward this work that you 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 73 

may have no regret in re-nominating me to this position. I 
sincerely thank you. (Applause.) 

President : I will ask for the report of the committee on 
time and place — selection of the place of next meeting. 

W. II. Justus: Mr. Duffy and I are in favor of Hender- 
sonville and Mr. Yaughan for Durham, X. C. 

President: What shall we do with the Committee's re- 
port ? 

P. W. Vaughan: I want to renew the invitation for the 
members to meet in Durham next year. It seems to me that 
was the understanding last year that they would meet in 
Durham next year. We extended yon the invitation from the 
different organizations of that city. I hope the members of 
this Association will vote meeting in Durham nexi year. I 
believe the Committee decided Durham was the most suc- 
cessful place, and we would have more present at that meet- 
ing. I think that was the opinion. (Applause.) You all will 
agree with me that Durham is more centrally located than 
Hendersonville. and we meet each year for the benefit of the 
Association, and not for the benefit of the city. Xow you 
know you can get from any part of the State to Durham in a 
few hours travel. You have to travel from the eastern part 
of the State 400 or 500 miles to get to Hendersonville. I 
claim and Durham claims that the meeting in Durham will 
be more largely attended and result in much more good than 
at Hendersonville. I urge upon you all to vote for Durham. 

W. IT. Justus : I think we can have as good a time at Hen- 
dersonville as at any other place. TYe are due to go west now, 
and I think we are entitled to it. 

Delegate : I move that we take a rising vote on the place 
of meeting. 



74 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

P. W. Yaugiiax : I would like to amend the motion by 
raking a ballot vote. 

John Sprague: Raleigh has invited the Association, and 
we arc very sorry the Committee didn't name it. We be- 
lieve we have a few friends here who would like for it to go 
to Raleigh. I wish to ask thai we put Raleigh in for nomina- 
tion. 

("poii balloting the result showed : 

Eendersonville, 32 votes; Durham, L3 votes; Raleigh, 8 
votes. 

Therefore, Hendersonville was selected as the next place of 
meeting. 

THE TIME 

W. II. Justus: I think the best time to have that meet- 
ing would be the second Wednesday in June. Hotels will 
all be open then, and everything will be in shape 

J. P. Stowe: Wouldn'1 the second week in June be a 
little bit early, the Hoard has to meet there a week before. 
The third week in June would suit us better. 

J. G. Beard: — I would like to make a suggestion that we 
wait a little bit later than we have been doing. Most of the 
delegates are not worn out then and do not care to take the 
recreation. I would like to say the first week in July. 

C. V>. Miller : The trouble about July is that Henderson- 
ville is over-flowing then. 

John Sprague : Can't we overflow with them ? 

J. P. Stowe : I would like to compromise with Mr. Beard 
and make it the fourth week in June. In July the people 
are nocking in there by the hundreds. We can't get accom- 
modation in July, that we can the latter part of June. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 75 

E. A. Turlington: It seems to me that the fourth week 
in June is a bad time for druggists to get away from home 
because of the first of the month coming on. We are all busy 
getting out our statements. I move that we don't meet any- 
where near the first of the month. 

F. W. Hancock: The board is discussing the matter of 
holding both of its meetings at the same place. We want the 
expression of the Association. The reason we have met with 
the Association has been that the candidates would remain 
over and join the Association, but there were not but four 
that remained over out of the 62 whites. In order to do this, 
we want to meet at one place. The Board is considering meet- 
ing at Raleigh, holding both of its meetings there. The third 
week in June would suit us as well as any other time. 

President : Was that not due to the fact that they would 
have to stay here at an additional cost I 

F. W. Hancock: Take the Virginia Board, they have a 
Laboratory where they can have their practical work, and we 
find that it is essential that we should inaugurate practical 
work. 

John Sprague: It will be a great pleasure for me to 
furnish a suitable place in Raleigh for practical work — that 
is, if it does not cost over $100.00. I will be very glad indeed 
to donate it to the Association. 

C. D. Bkadham : Don't have the meeting the first week 
in July, I could not be there then. You could get more peo- 
ple from this end of the State the second week in July. 

J. P. Stowe : If Justus thinks the hotels can accomo- 
date ns the second week in July, I would like to say that we 
meet there that week, say Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. 

G. E. Burwell: I wish to say that Mr. Turlington is 
exactly right. If the meeting is held near the first of the 



76 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

month, or the latter part, it will be too hard on any of the 
merchants to go, so I believe the second week in July will be 
agreeable all around, and satisfactory to everyone. 

( '. I). Sedbekry: I have a letter from St. John, the man- 
ager of the St. John Hotel there, stating that he can accomo- 
date us nicely. They have a nice ball there, and say they 
can dn everything possible To make it pleasant for us. 

Motion conies lip for an amendment that we meet the sec- 
ond week in July. Mr. .Justus amends that by saying the 
third week in June. Third Wednesday in June carried. 

Mr. W. II. Justus elected for the position of Local Secre- 
tary at Hendersonville for next year's meeting. 

( '. I). Bradham: T have a matter to bring before you 
that I think yon ought to take some action on and that is free 
sugar. Every druggist and every household is interested in 
free sugar, and I think we all should take some official action 
to show our Congressmen that we should have free sugar and 
that we approve the tariff bill which the Democratic Senators 
are putting before the people. 

Peesidext: What is the pleasure of the Association 
about the suggestion of Mr. Bradham. 

C. B. Miller: We all rake a little sugar occasionally. I 
therefore make a motion that this Convention go on record 
as favoring free sugar, and we instruct our Secretary to en- 
dorse the idea of free sugar to the proper authorities. (< ar- 
ried. ) 

J. P. Stowe: This matter of the Board meeting in Ral- 
eigh regularly was not settled. I would like for that to be 
brought up before the Association, and would like for the 
members to express their opinion along that line. 

Of course the laboratories have to be looked out for by us, 



North Carolina, Pharmaceutical Association 77 

or someone else. I believe Mr. Sprague lias offered to donate 
a laboratory; I think the Association should signify a wil- 
lingness to accept that. I would 'like to hear the members say 
something about it. I think the Board as a whole is very 
much in favor of that change. 

G. E. Bukwell: I believe we could accomplish a great 
deal of good, and I think we should accept Mr. Sprague's 
offer with hearty thanks. I make this as a motion: that the 
Association accept Mr. Sprague's offer, and of course it is 
up to the Board whether they do this or not, and should go on 
record as heartily approving of it. 

J. E. Shell: I think it is up t i the Hoard to do whatever 
they think best. I wish to second the motion Burwell has 
made, or would like to amend it a little. 

President: — I suggest that the Association by a rising 
vote express their heartfelt thanks for the kind offer of Mr. 
Sprague, that he will furnish them with a laboratory not to 
er $100.00 at Raleigh. (Carried.) 

E. V. Howell: I offered the State Board the laboratories 
at Chapel Hill, but there is something to be said as to the 
inaceasibility of the University. We extended to 
them not only one laboratory, but three. 1 have heard 
nothing from it, but I think this ought to be left to the 
Board, and I should certainly want to put in my offer of 
laboratories along with Mr. Sprague. This has been brought 
up before the Board for some little time. They made their 
report after going to Virginia and approved of having this 
laboratory. 1 then tendered them the laboratories at the 
State University. 

J. P. Stowe: I say this in bahalf of the Board: We 
thank Mr. Howell very much for his offer, but the one reason 
we suggested Raleigh was on account of hotel accommoda- 



78 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

tions, and the location of Raleigh. The class number for 
several years amounts to TO or 75, and it is a question in my 
mind whether that number could get accommodations at 
Chapel Hill. 

E. V. Howell: Practically at all times we could accom- 
modate thai number. 

J. P. Stowe: I don't want Howell or any friends of the 
University to feel that there was any partiality shown when 
I said go to Raleigh. I look upon Raleigh as most central. 
and tn tell the truth, I didn't think of the University at that 
time. 

E. V. Zoeller: Some doubt has come in my mind whether 
Sprague meant to donate the $100, whenever the Association 
should hold their examinations in Raleigh, or on condition 
they should hold it there all the time. 

John Sprague: Of course if some other town should 
offer that amount of money, and the Board could get the 
same accommodations it is all right. I would be glad for you 
insider that we would like to have you, and personally I 
would be very glad to donate the $100.00 and I think it 
should cover the cost of the laboratory expense. Of course, 
this does not go to any other town, but is to be held in 
Raleigh. 

C. D. Beadham: The Committee has arranged for a 
theatre party this evening, and would be glad to have you go 
to "Athens" to a moving picture show. We will meet at the 
Gaston Hotel at 8 o'clock. 

The President asked the Chairman of the Legislative Com- 
mittee to make his report : 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 79 



REPORT OF LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE. 

To the Members of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association : 
Gentle men : 

In compliance with instructions as set forth in the resolutions unani- 
mously adopted by the Association at Morehead City, July 191 1 and 
ratified at Waynesville, June, 1912, your Committee met and drafted a 
Bill amending the State Pharmacy Law. After the Bill had been 
agreed upon it was drafted in legal form by General B. S. Royster, 
the Attorney of our Board, and after being printed, copies were mailed 
to all the members of the Association. 

It was introduced in the House of Representatives by Hon. Thos. 
N. Hall of Iredell County. The Bill was referred to the Committee 
on Health. When it came up for hearing before the committee, 
opposition on the part of some of the Druggists of the state developed. 
One of the objections to the Bill resulted from the omission of the 
clause allowing to the general dealer the sale of non-poisonous 
remedies, which clause was inadvertently left oft" by the stenographer 
of General Royster. The Committee agreed that this omission should 
be corrected in the Bill and this was done. The other clause creating 
objection was that requiring that all candidates before being consider- 
ed eligible to take the examination of the Board as Managers should 
be graduates of some reputable School or College of Pharmacy. It 
was decided best to substitute "should have 10 months' attendance at 
a reputable School or College of Pharmacy" in place of "should be a 
graduate of some reputable School or College of Pharmacy." There 
was also some little objection to having two grades of Licentiates. 
The following is the Bill, therefore, which was agreed upon and 
which received a favorable report both in the House and in the Senate. 
A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT TO AMEND CHAPTER 
ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHT OF THE PUBLIC LAWS OF 
1905, ENTITLED "AN ACT TO REVISE, CONSOLIDATE AND 
AMEND THE PHARMACY LAW." 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Sec. 1. That section 4 of Chapter 108, of the Public Laws of 1905, 
be stricken out and the following substituted in lieu thereof: 

"Sec. 4. That it shall be unlawful for any person not licensed as a 
pharmacist within the meaning of this act to conduct or manage any 
pharmacy, drug or chemical store, apothecary shop or other place of 
business for the retailing, compounding or dispensing of any drug, 
chemical or poison, and for the compounding of physicians' prescrip- 
tions, or to keep exposed for sale at retail any drug, chemical, or poi- 
son, except as hereinafter provided or for any person not licensed as 



80 North Carol nut Pharmaceutical Association 

a pharmacist or assistant pharmacist within the meaning of this act, 
to compound, dispense, or sell at retail any drug, chemical, poison or 
pharmaceutical preparation upon the prescription of a physician or 
otherwise, or to compound physicians' prescriptions except as an aid 
to and under the immediate supervision of a person licensed as a 
pharmacist under this act : Provided, that during the temporary ab- 
sence of the licensed pharmacist in charge of any pharmacy, drug or 
chemical store a licensed assistant pharmacist may conduct or have 
charge of said store. And it shall be unlawful for any owner or 
manager of a pharmacy or drug store or other place of business to 
cause or permit any other than a licensed pharmacist or assistant phar- 
macist to compound, dispense or sell at retail, any drug, medicine, or 
poison except as an aid to and under the immediate supervision of a 
person licensed as a pharmacist or assistant pharmacist: Provided, 
however, that nothing in this section shall be construed to interfere 
with any legally registered physician in the compounding of his own 
prescriptions, nor with the exclusive wholesale business of any 
dealer who shall be licensed as a pharmacist, or who shall keep in his 
employ at least one person who is licensed as a pharmacist, nor with 
the selling at retail of non-poisonous domestic remedies, nor with the 
sale of patent or proprietary preparations which do not contain poison- 
ous ingredients, nor with the sale of poisonous substances which are 
sold exclusively for use in the arts or for use as insectides 
when such substances are sold in unbroken packages bearing a label 
having plainly printed upon it the name of the contents, the word 
"Poison," the vignette of the skull and cross-bones, and the name of 
at least two readily obtainable antidotes: Provided, further, that in 
any village of not mi. re than live hundred inhabitants the board of 
pharmacy may grant any legally registered practicing physician a per- 
mit to conduct a drug store or pharmacy in such a village, which permit 
shall not be valid in any other village than the one for which it was 
granted, and shall cease and terminate when the population of the 
village for which such permit was granted shall become greater than 
five hundred." 

SEC 2. That section o of chapter 108 of the Public Laws of 1905 be 
amended as follows: 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" and before the word "and" in 
line 11 thereof, the word "and assistant pharmacist." 

Sec. 3. That section 12 of chapter 108 of the Public Laws of 1905 
be amended as follows : 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" and before the word "five'' in 
line 3 thereof, the words "or assistant pharmacist" and insert aftei the 
word "pharmacist" and before the word "two" in line four thereof, 
the words "or assistant pharmacist." 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 81 

Sec. 4. That section 13 of chapter 108 of the Public Laws of 1905, 
be amended as follows : 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" in lines 5 and 6 and before the 
word "shall" in line 6 thereof, the words "or assistant pharmacist;" 
insert after the word "pharmacist" in lines 14 and 15, and before the 
word "The," in line 15 the words "or assistant pharmacist." 

Sec. 5. That section fourteen of chapter one hundred and eight or 
the Public Laws of 1905 be striken out and the following inserted in 
lieu thereof : 

Sec. 14. That in order to become licensed as a pharmacist, within 
the meaning of this act, an applicant shall not be less than twenty-one 
years of age, he shall present to the board satisfactory evidence that 
he has had four years' experience in pharmacy under the instruction 
of a licensed pharmacist, and that he has had ten months of atten- 
dance at a reputable school or college of pharmacy,' and he shall also 
pass a satisfactory examination before the Board of Pharmacy: i ro- 
vided, however, That in the case of applicants who have attended a 
reputable school or college of pharmacy the actual time of attendance 
at such school or college of pharmacy may be deducted from the time 
of experience required, but in no case shall less than two years' ex- 
perience be required for a registration as a licensed pharmacist. In 
order to be licensed as an Assistant Pharmacist, within the meaning 
of this act, an aplicant shall be not less than eighteen years of age; 
shall have had a sufficient preliminary general education, and shall 
have had not less than three years' experience in pharmacy under the 
instruction of a licensed pharmacist, and shall pass a satisfactory 
examination by, or under the direction of the Board of Pharmacy: 
Provided, however, that applicants for license as Assistant Pharmacists 
who have attended a reputable school or college of pharmacy may 
have deducted from the time of experience required the actual time 
of attendance at such school or college of pharmacy, such time not to 
exceed two years." 

SEC 6. That section fifteen of chapter one hundred and eight of the 
Public Laws of 1905 be amended as follows: 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" and before the word "has" in line 
one thereof, the following words "or assistant pharmacist"; insert 
after the word "pharmacist" and before the word "and" in line four 
thereof the words "or assistant pharmacist" and before the word "up", 
in line five thereof, the words "or assistant pharmacist." 

Sec. 7. That section eighteen of chapter one hundred and eight of 
the Public Laws of 1905 be amended as follows : 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" in lines one and two, and before 
the word "and" in line two thereof, the words "or assistant pharma- 



82 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

cist;" insert after the word "pharmacist" and before the word "who" 
in line eight thereof the words "or assistant pharmacist." 

Sec. 8. That section nineteen of chapter one hundred and eight of 
the Public Laws of 1905 be amended as follows : 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" and before the word "shall" in 
line four thereof the words "or assistant pharmacist" ; insert after the 
word "pharmacist" and before the word "and" in line seven thereof, 
the words "or assistant pharmacist;" insert after the word "pharmacist" 
in lines eight and nine and before the word "shall" in line nine thereof 
the words "or assistant pharmacist." 

Sec. 9. That section twenty-two of chapter one hundred and eight 
of the Public Laws of 1905 be amended by adding to said section the 
following : 

"and it shall unlawful for any person not legally licensed as an assis- 
tant pharmacist to take, use or exhibit the title of assistant pharmacist, 
or any other title or description of like import." 

Sec 10. That section twenty-four of chapter one hundred and 
eight of the Public Laws of 1905 be amended as follows : 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" in line one, and before the word 
"who" in line two the words "or assistant pharmacist;" insert after 
the word "pharmacist" and before the word "to", in line six thereof, 
the following words, "or assistant pharmacist." 

SEC 11. That section twenty-nine of chapter one hundred and eight 
of the Public Laws of 1905 be amended as follows : 

Insert after the word "pharmacist" in lines one and two and before 
the word "who" in line two thereof, the words "or assistant pharma- 
cist." 

Sec. i-'. That the provisions of this act shall not affect any one now 
legally in the drug business or who may become licensed by January 
first 1915. 

Sec 13. That this act shall be in force from and after January 1st, 
I9I5- 

SECTIONS OF PHARMACY LAW, AFFECTED BY PROPOSED 
AMENDMENTS, AS THEY WOULD BE WHEN AMENDED. 

(Parts changed in italics.) 

"SEC 4. That it shall be unlawful for any person not licensed as a 
pharmacist within the meaning of this act to conduct or manage any 
pharmacy, drug or chemical store, apothecary shop or other place of 
business of the retailing, compounding or dispensing of any drug, 
chemical or poison, and for the compounding of physicians' prescrip- 
tions, or to keep exposed for the sale at retail any drug, chemical, or 
poison, except as hereinafter provided or for- any person not licensed 



North Carol inn Pharmaceutical Association 83 

as a pharmacist or assistant pharmacist within the meaning of this act, 
to compound, dispense, or sell at retail any drug, chemical, poison or 
pharmaceutical preparation upon the prescription of a physician or 
otherwise, or to compound physicians' prescriptions except as an aid 
to and under the immediate supervision of a person licensed as a phar- 
macist under this act : Provided, that during the temporary absence of 
the licensed pharmacist in charge of any pharmacy, drug, or chemical 
store a licensed assistant pharmacist may conduct or have charge of said 
store. And it shall be unlawful for any owner or manager of a phar- 
macy or drug store or other place of business to cause or permit any 
other than a licensed pharmacist or assistant pharmacist to compound, 
dispense or sell at retail, any drug, medicine or poison except as an 
aid to and under the immediate supervision of a person licensed as a 
pharmacist or assistant pharmacist : Provided, however, that nothing 
in this section shall be construed to interfere with any legally regis- 
tered physician in the compounding of his own prescriptions, nor with 
the exclusively wholesale business of any dealer who shall be licensed 
as a pharmacist, or who shall keep in his employ at least one person 
who is licensed as a pharmacist, nor with the selling at retail of non- 
poisonous domestic remedies, nor with the sale of patent or pro- 
prietary preparations which do not contain poisonous ingredients, nor 
with the sale of poisonous substances which are sold exclusively for 
use in the arts or for use as insecticides when such substances are sold 
in unbroken packages bearing a label having plainly printed upon it the 
name of the contents, the word "Poison," the vignette of the skull and 
cross-bones, and the name of at least two readily obtainable antidotes : 
Provided, further, That in any village of not more than five hundred 
inhabitants the Board of Pharmacy may grant any legally registered 
practicing physician a permit to conduct a drug store or pharmacy in 
such a vilage, which permit shall not be valid in any other village, 
than the one for which it was granted, and shall cease and terminate 
when the population of the village for which such permit was granted 
shall become greater than five hundred. 

Sec. 9. That the Board of Pharmacy shall have a common seal, and 
shall have the power and authority to define and designate non-poison- 
ous domestic remedies, adopt such rules, regulations and by-laws, not 
inconsistent with this act, as may be necessary for the regulation of 
its proceedings, and for the discharge of the duties imposed under 
this act, and shall have power and authority to employ an attorney to 
conduct prosecutions and to assist in the conduct of prosecutions under 
this act, and for any other purposes which said board may deem 
necessary. The said Board of Pharmacy shall keep a record of its 
proceedings and a register of all persons to whom certificates of license 
as pharmacists and assistant pharmacists and permits have been issued, 
and of all renewals thereof ; and the books and register of said board 



8-i North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

or a copy of any part thereof, certified by the secretary, attested by 
the seal of said hoard, shall be taken and accepted as competent 
evidence in all the courts of the State. The said Board of Pharmacy 
shall make annually to the Governor and to the North Carolina Phar- 
maceutical Asociation written reports if its proceedings, and of its 
receipts and disbursements under this act and of all persons licensed 
to practice as pharmacists in this State. A majority of the board 
shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of all business. 

SEC. 12. That the Board of Pharmacy shall be entitled to charge 
and collect the following fees: For the examination of an applicant 
for license as a pharmacist or assistant pharmacist five dollars; for 
renewing the license as a pharmacist or assistant pharmacist two dol- 
lars : for issuing a permit to a physician to conduct a drug store in a 
village of not more than five hundred inhabitants, three dollars; for 
the renewal of permit to a physician to conduct a drug store in a 
village of not more than live hundred inhabitants, two dollars. All 
fees shall be paid before any applicant may be admitted to examination 
or his name placed upon the register of pharmacists, or before any 
license or permit or any renewal thereof may be issued by the said 
board. 

Sec. 13. That every person now licensed or registered as a phar- 
macist under the laws of this State shall be entitled to continue in 
the practice of his profession until the expiration of the term for 
which his certificate of registration or license was issued. Every person 
who shall hereafter desire to be licensed as a pharmacist or assistant 
pharmacist shall file with the Secretary of the Board of Pharmacy 
an application, duly verified under oath, setting forth the name and 
age of the applicant, the place or places at which and the time he has 
spent in the study of the science and art of pharmacy, the experience 
in the compounding of physicians' prescriptions which the applicant 
has had under the direction of a legally licensed pharmacist, and such 
applicant shall appear at a time and place designated by the Board of 
Pharmacy and submit to an examination as to his qualification for 
registration as a licensed pharmacist, or assistant pharmacist. The 
application hereinafter referred to shall be prepared and furnished by 
the Board' of Pharmacy. 

SEC 14. That in order to become licensed as a pharmacist, within the 
meaning of this act, an applicant shall be not less than 21 years or 
age, he shall present to the board satisfactory evidence that he has had 
four years experience in pharmacy under the instruction of a licensed 
pharmacist, and that he has had ten months of attendance at a reputable 
school or college of pharmacy, and he shall also pass a satisfactory 
examination before the Board of Pharmacy : Provided, however, That 
in the case of applicants who have attended a reputable school or 
college of pharmacy the actual time of attendance at such school or 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 85 

college of pharmacy may he deducted from the time of experience re- 
quired, but in no case shall less than two years' experience be required 
for a registration as a licensed pharmacist. /;; order to be licensed as 
an Assistant Pharmacist, within the meaning of this act, an applicant 
shall he not less than eighteen years of age; shall have had a sufficient 
preliminary general education, and shall have had not less than three 
years' experience in pharmacy under the instruction of t licensed phar- 
macist, and shall pass a satisfactory examination b\ or under the direc- 
tion of the Board of Pharmacy: Provided, however that applicants for 
license as Assistant Pharmacists who have a lenl:i a reputable school' 
or college of pharmacy may hair deducted from iiu time of experience 
required the actual titii* oj attendance at 'inch school cr college cf 
pharmacy, such time not to exceed two years. 

Sec. 15. That if an applicant for license as a pharmacist or assis- 
tant pharmacist has complied with all the requirements of the two 
preceding sections, the Board of Pharmacy shall enroll his name upon 
the register of pharmacists, or assistant pharmacists and issue to him a 
license which shall entitle him to practice as a pharmacist or assistant 
pharmacist up to the first day of September next ensuing, as provided 
in this act for the annual renewal of every registration. 

Sec.*i8. That every certificate or license to practice as a pharmacist 
or assistant pharmacist, and every permit to a practicing physician to 
conduct a pharmacy or drug store in a village of not more than five 
hundred inhabitants, and every last renewal of such license or permit 
shall be conspiciously exposed in the pharmacy or drug store or place 
of business which the pharmacist or other person to whom it is issued, 
is the owner or manager, or in which he is employed. Every licensed 
pharmacist, or assistant pharmacist who desires to continue in the 
practice of his profession, and every physician holding a permit to 
sell drugs in a village of not more than five hundred inhabitants shall, 
within thirty days next preceding the expiration of his license or per- 
mit, file with the secretary and treasurer of the Board of Pharmacy 
an application for the renewal thereof, which application shall be 
accompanied by the fee thereinbefore prescribed. 

Sec. 19. That if the Board of Pharmacy shall find that an applicant 
has been legally licensed in this State, and is entitled to a renewal 
thereof, or to a renewal of a permit, it shall issue to him a certificate 
attesting that fact. And if any pharmacist or assistant pharmacist shall 
fail for a period of sixty days after expiration of his license to make 
application to the Board for its renewal, his name shall be erased 
from the register of licensed pharmacists or assistant pharmacists, and 
such person, in order to again become registered as a licensed pharma- 
cist or assistant pharmacist shall be required to pay the same fee as in 
the case of original registration. And if any holder of a permit to 
sell drugs in a village of not more than five hundred inhabitants shall 



86 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

fail, for a period of sixty days after the expiration of his permit, to 
make application for the renewal thereof, his name shall be erased 
from the register of persons holding such permits, and he may be 
restored thereto only upon payment of the fee required for the grant- 
ing of original permit. The registration of every license and every 
permit issued by the Hoard shall expire on the thirty-first day of 
August next ensuing the granting thereof. 

SEC. 22. That it shall be unlawful for any person not legally licensed 
as a pharmacist to take, use or exhibit the title of pharmacist or licens- 
ed or registered pharmacist, or the title of druggist or apothecary, or 
any other title, name or description of like import. And it shall be 
unlawful for any person nut legally licensed as an assistant pharmacist 
to take, use or exhibit the title of assistant pharmacist, or any other 
tide or ^description of like import. 

Sec. 24. Thai any person, not being licensed as a pharmacist or 
assistant pharmacist, who shall compound, dispense or sell at retail 
am drug, medicine, poison or pharmaceutical preparation, either upon 
a physician's prescription or otherwise, and any person being the 
owmr or manager of a drug store, pharmacy or other place of business 
who shall cause or permit any one not licensed as a pharmacist or 
assistant pharmacist to dispense, sell at retail or compound any drug, 
medicine, poison <>r physician's prescription contrary to the provisions 
of section four of this act, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and upon conviction thereof shall lie fined not less than twenty-five 
dollars nor more than one hundred dollars. 

SEC. jo. That any person, not being legally licensed as a pharma- 
cist or assistant pharmacist, who shall take, use or exhibit the title of 
pharmacist, licensed or registered pharmacist, druggist, apothecary 
or any other title, name or description of like import, contrary to the 
provisions of section twenty-two of this act, shall be guilty of a mis- 
demeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not less than 
twenty-live dollars nor more than one hundred dollars. 

That the provision of this act shall not affect any one now legally 
in the drug business or -who may become licensed by January first, 
[915. 

That this act shall be in force from and after January first, 1015." 

However, said Rill did not pass, due, we believe, to the lateness of 
the session at winch it came up and the congested condition of the 
calendar at that time. 

A bill was introduced to prevent the distribution of samples of 
patent medicines unless put into the hands of an adult person. 

Another Bill was introduced to prevent the itinerant vending of 
medicines from wagons and otherwise. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 87 

Both of these Bills failed to pass. Several others were introduced 
allowing persons to practice Pharmacy without being licensed, but 
these were all killed. 

The Revenue Act proposed by the Joint Finance Committee of the 
Senate and the House imposed a tax of 5 per cent, on all soft drinks 
containing caffeine. This was strenuously fought before the Finance 
Committee and gotten removed before the bill was presented. This 
will save the Retail Druggists of the State quite a large amount. 

A special privilege tax of from $7.50 to $15.00 was put upon soda 
fountains. This we were unable to get removed. A professional tax 
of $5.00 on all licensed Pharmacists was also proposed in the Revenue 
Act. We appeared before the Finance Committee and tried to get this 
taken off, but they refused to remove it. We then fought its passage 
in the House, but the House passed it. Next, we fought it in the 
Senate, and succeeded in having it removed. 

The following Cocaine Bill was introduced by Senator Bryant of 
Durham County. Before its introduction he referred it to your Com- 
mittee for correction (several corrections were made) and for their 
approval. 

(For Bill see Board of Pharmacy Report, page 145). 

We submit herewith a statement of the Expenses of each member 
of the Committee while in attendance upon the sessions of the 
Legislature : 

F. W. Hancock 60.00 

F. V. Zoeller S4 . gs 

\V. W. Home I4 . 5 n 

I. W. Rose 27-90 

.1. P. Stowe 30.65 

Total $ ^8.00 . 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. W. Hancock, 

Chairman of the Committee. 

Printed copies of the Bill -were distributed to the members present. 

The following were elected to membership in the Associa- 
tion : 

William F. Strayhorn Durham, N. C. 

John A. Trent Leaksville, N. C. 

John S. Birmingham Hamlet, N. C. 

Frank D. Culpepper Spring Hope, N. C. 



88 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Ernest H. Wood Newbern, N. C. 

Walter A. Lane Newbern, N. (_. 

O. G. Coppedge Kinston, N. C. 

Carey H. Fleming Hassell, N. C. 

John B. Coppedge Greensboro, X. C. 

S. A. Chalk Morehead City, N. C. 

Peyton R. Hamlet Raleigh, N. C. 

Frank R. Bell . . . . Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Sidiiey G. Etheredge Elizabeth City, X. C. 

C. L. Cox Warsaw, X. C. 

Ralph C. Cannaday Benson, N. C. 

Fred H. Marley Lenoir, X. C. 

Eugene Rimmer Tarboro, X. C. 

Jno. L. Henderson Hickory, N. C. 

Joe M. Anderson Xewbern, X. C. 

Paul C. Hood Dunn, X. C. 

Andrew J. Saunders Belmont, X. C. 

Percy O. Leggett Southport, X. C. 

John B. Jones Fair Bluff, X. C. 

W. R. Nowell Wendell, X. C. 

William A. Brame Rocky Mount, X. C. 

Joseph K. Brown Scotland Xeck, X. C. 

Hugh A. Barnes Maxton, X. C. 

Chas. L. O'Hagan Home Greenville. X. C. 

Ernest E. Murchison Clayton, X. C. 

Raiford T. Tulghum Kenley, X. C. 

Carney Foster Enfield, X. C. 

J. X. Loftin Troy, X. C. 

O. H. Lyon Washington, X. C. 

Claude X. Smith Durham, X. C. 

Lee Davenport Washington, X. C. 

Grover B. Walton Washington, X. C. 

W. H. IIorxe: There are so few members here, I feel 
that it should be left to the Executive Committee to make 
some arrangement with some one to act as Field Secretary. I 
make that as n motion. (Seconded by Tarkiugton.) 

( '. P. Greyer : I move that the Association adopt the re- 
port of the Legislative Committee and that they continue 
their efforts to have this law passed. 

G. E. Burwell : That bill was defeated not by the mem- 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 89 

bers of the Association, but by the non-members. If the 
copies of this are mailed to every registered druggist of the 
State, with a letter, I think that would accomplish a great 
deal of good. 

C. D. Bbadham : Does this bill provide for two classes of 
registered men ? 

F. W. Hancock : Yes. 

C. D. Brabham : I have been told that it was defeated on 
that account, and for no other reason whatever in the world. 
I have heard some very influential people say they did not 
propose to see it passed. I am just giving you this as a mat- 
ter of information. 

W. H. Weabn : I notified this Association at the More- 
head meeting in 1908 where this subject that has just been 
presented was brought up — that there is no knifeing at all. I 
have said on previous occasions at Charlotte that this very 
thing wanted to be brought out fairly and squarely and to do 
it. Don't wait until we have only 15 or 20 members, or at 
the tail end of the meeting to get sentiment about it. At 
Morehead in 1908 where a full meeting was gathered, they 
advocated for and against, they voted it down, almost unani- 
mously. It was taken up again in Greensboro at a wind-up 
meeting. At Charlotte at a wind-up meeting, taken up again 
at two or three other meetings when I was not present and I 
am informed that it was partially settled, and it is now dis- 
cussed at a wind-up meeting. So if this Association wants 
to go on record fairly and squarely and get a fair and square 
reputation as to what the druggists of North Carolina want, 
they should advertise it sufficiently before the meeting, and 
then the Association would have better grounds to go to the 
Legislature of North Carolina, to ask for it, as being- 
asked for by the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. Don't delay the matter of sending out instructions 



!>0 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

five tn seven days before the Legislature meets — that is snap 
judgment. Do the thing" fairly and squarely and in the open. 
There are a great many druggists not in favor of this pre- 
requisite movement. Only three states in the Union that 
have passed this law, while nearly all have voted on it. 

E. V. Howell: Do some of the members want to know 
the history of this bill before the Legislature? The people 
who want better legislation for the druggists of the State 
have been working for this, and I happened to be down there 
and know the facts of the case, if not, those who were presenl 
can correct me. This movement started al Greensboro, tiny 
pnt it off for a full discussion al the Charlotte meeting. It 
came up there on the lasl day, a TOte was taken and Mr 
Wearn was the dissenting member of the L9 members who 
wore present. He said afterwards if they would put it ln- 
fore the Association he would be satisfied. After due notice 
to the members of the Association that it would come up, 
it was brought up at Morehead and carried without oppo- 
sition. We also took Mr. Wearn's position that people who 
were not members should vote. 

In the letter I sent To the druggists to endorse I received a 
favorable reply from between three ami four hundred, I did 
not specify graduation, hut eighteen months of work in some 
reputable school of pharmacy. The hill drawn by your com- 
mittee required graduation. 4 years experience, and then to 
pass an examination; for the higher grade of pharmacist, 
two years of experience and to pass an examination for as- 
sistant pharmacist. Opposition to the hill was aroused by a 
mi-take in drawing the bill when a clause was omitted. This 
error, which was accidental, aroused the opposition of grocers 
a- it prohibited them to sell patents, etc. The hill was given 
to one of our members who introduced it. At the first hearing 
before the legislative committee it was defeated 5 to 3, the 
introducer voting against it. At a rehearing before this same 






Xorth Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 01 

committee, the error was corrected, graduation omitted, and 
10 months of training in sonic school of pharmacy inserted. 
Certain jobbers and others opposed to the bill were repre- 
sented before the committee by a lawyer. The committee 
passed the bill favorably, the introducer and one other oppos- 
ing. If received a favorable report in the Senate but by delay 
came u;» in the last days of the session and was ta'bled. In spit,. 
of the attack made upon in.- by a paid lawyer hired by some 
opposed to the efforts for better education of pharmacists, I 
shall continue in my efforts to have some required work in 
some school of pharmacy demanded of those applying for 
license as registered pharmacists. Ar present there is no re- 
quirement that a man shall have any education to engage in 
this work where questions of health and life are involved. 
while dentists and doctors must spend four years in college, 
graduate and then take an examination. If there is oppo- 
sition to the two classes, 1 think the retail druggists should 
thoroughly consider this phase of it. I certainly can see no 
reason why a druggist for financial or other reasons, should 
alone in our professions— oppose a question of hotter train- 
ing and higher education. 

F. W. Eancock: We found that when this opposition 
arose that the principal excuse that was used for the oppo- 
sition was the graduation clause; that in the House it 
was referred to a sub-committee, who suggested ten months' 
attendance at a school of pharmacy. 

( '. I). Bradeam : Do you see where it will benefit the 
retail druggists to have two grades? Don't you believe the 
examinations held here last week sufficient if anyone passes 
it, whether he is a graduate or not '. 

J. E. Shell : Don't you think if the Board would give a 
practical examination that those that stood the exami- 
nation would he fit to run a drug store? 



92 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

E. V. Howell : An examination is one method of determ- 
ining the ability of a candidate to practice pharmacy. The 
mere answering of a given set of questions is not final proof 
of one's ability. I have contended for careful systematic 
training for a sufficient length of time and an examination. 
This examination would be more thorough if there were fa- 
cilities for practical examination. 

C. D. Bradham: Don't you believe there are a great 
many men more capable of running a drug store that made 
80 per cent, if they went to a pharmacy school than some 
that made 99 per cent? 

E. V. Howell : Both would have the same license. I 
think the one with the longer training in a school of phar- 
macy better trained for his life work. 

C. J>. Bkadbam: I believe a man can get a practical edu- 
cation in a drug store. I have always been in favor of a man 
studying somewhere. I don't say the University of North 
Carolina, because I went through the back door there. 

E. V. Howell: This committee wants to go ahead and 
receive approbation of their work. Now as to Mr. Wearn's 
point; I want us to get together on it. Mr. Wearn says he 
is opposed to that graduation clause. 

W. II. Weakn: First of all I want to correct the state- 
ment of Prof. Howell. There is no body of men that I have 
a higher esteem for than the representatives of the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association. I have the greatest 
respect for the Board of Pharmacy. I don't know of a single 
man in the N. C. P. A. that I am not a true friend to. I 
stand for what I stand and I am not afraid to express my 
sentiments. I fight it out on the flat ground, and then I am 
through. I have no malice to anyone. 

Professor Howell and I differ on certain lines, but he and 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 93 

I are the best of friends, and I have nothing against him 
whatever. I do mean to say that this question has been 
carried up for consideration at different times, and this As- 
sociation can't say that it has the entire approbation of this 
Association when it has a wind-up meeting like this. 

It was again taken up at Greensboro at a wind-up meeting 
then again at Charlotte at a wind-up meeting. Eight here is 
where Professor Howell and I had a mutual understanding. 
He came to me after it was over and says, "I understand your 
position, you stand for higher education," which I do. ]STo 
man believes in higher education of pharmacists than I do. I 
believe in the Board of Pharmacy raising their standard 
higher. A man is bound to have the support of his class. 

Professor Howell came to me in the store and said he un- 
derstood my position and he was in favor, and anxious to get 
some legislation through at the next legislature; he didn't 
want to wait. He wanted to see if he and I could get to- 
gether. He had a paper drawn up on the typewriter and he 
and I signed it, with the understanding that it would not 
come up any more, as far as he and I were concerned. I was 
not present at the next meeting, but the next thing I heard of 
ir popped up at Waynesville and here. The understanding on 
my part with Professor Howell was that it was a dead issue 
as soon as I signed that agreement. At the same time it has 
always been at the wind-up meetings. Raise the standard as 
high as you please. I want the examination made so prac- 
tical and so scientific that the man shall have some knowledge. 
My objection is on the ground that there are ninny that can't 
attend a year. If you will insert this gentlemen, I will agree 
with you and go with you. The graduation part of it, nine 
months, many of them can't attend that long; they can't pull 
up and leave home. I say if a man by his own hard industry 
and work is capable of digging that out, he should be allowed 
to satisfy this Board and have their recognition. If the As- 
sociation goes to the Legislature as a representative of the 



94 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

druggists of North Carolina, it should get the census of the 
whole membership. 

H. K. Guaxtiiam : We have had this up four years. You 
stayed here to hear ir. and why .should they not do it. We 
have the majority and the majority ought to rule. 

President: Don't you know that there was a motion 
made that the Board use all available means to curry rhis into 
effect, and have letters sent to every member of the Associa- 
tion I 

Adjournment until 8:30 P. M. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 95 

FIFTH SESSION 

Thursday, 8:30 P. M. 

On account of the inclemency of the weather the meeting- 
was held in the parlors of the hotel, and the theatre party was 
called off. 

.Meeting called to order at 8:30 P. M., by the President. 

Delegates to the Medical Society of North Carolina, held 
at Morehead City: C. D. Bradham, P. W. Vanghan and C. 
P. Harper, President. 

REPORT OF TREASURER FOR 1912 AND 1913. 
1912 

Tune 28. W. M. Parton — Janitor at Waynesville $ 4.50 

29. Postage 1.25 

July 6. Seeman Printer}- — Balance 7 1._|0 

P. W. Vaughan — Salary and Office Exp 95-3° 

12. R. S. McRae — Stenographer — on acc't 4.85 

15. St. Louis Button Co 34.00 

Aug. 22. R. S. McRae — Balance 40.15 

B. T. Knight 7-?5 

31. Postage 3-°o 

Sept. 3. St. Louis Button Co .76 

26. F. C. Abbott & Co.— Treasurer's Bond 7.50 

J. G. Beard — Draft 20.00 

Nov. 16. Stationary 3.50 

26. Post Cards & Printing 6.25 

1913. 

Jan. 20. G. E. Burwell— Salary 50.00 

May 19. Postage & Express 1.00 

30. Postage & Express 1.00 

Seeman Printery 75-00 

June 1 1. J. G. Beard — Salary 75-00 

J. G. Geard — Expenses 14.87 

G. E. Burwell — Incidentals 3.35 

12. Seeman Printer} — Balance 231.85 

$ 751.78 



96 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

June 28. Cash an hand $ 104.64 

Collections from Members 509.00 

Collections from Advertisements 338.00 

Collections from New Members 180.00 

$1,131-64 

Total Expenditures 75 l -7& 

Cash on hand 379-86 

$1,131.64 
COMMITTEE o.X ADULTERATION 

W. 11. Wkakx. Chairman: I have not come across any- 
thing in the way of an adulteration during the whole year. 
The office of Committee of Adulteration, as denned by the 
by-laws of the Association, is that this Committee re- 
ceive and examine all reports on anything that might be sent 
in by the members of the Association. Such samples have 
never been received. ]SFo communications from any quarter. 

P. W. Vaughan : Have you received any powdered opium 
during- the past year that didn't come up to the strength as 
specified on the label ? 

W. IT. Wearn: None at all. 

P. W. Y.vn; 11 an : How about asafoetida Do yon find any 
adulterations in that? Practically 25 per cent, of it is adul- 
terated. 

W. II. Wears : I have found as much as four ounces of 
shol in pound packages of opium, but have not since the Pure 
Food and Drug Law. Since this act has been in effect you 
don't very often run against cases of common adulteration. 

President: That rule applies to those things as easily 
examined as opium, but such as powdered goods and gum 
asafoetida are more or less adulterated. 

F. W. Hancock: Something has been said at the meeting 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 97 

and tonight in regard to the Pure Food and Drugs Act. I 
wish there was some way in which we could have that part of 
the drug act enforced. 

The Legislative Committee four years ago and two years 
ago, as well as at this last meeting made an attempt to see if 
we could not get some appropriation for the enforcement of 
that act. The act as it stands now on the standard books 
makes it the duty of the Agricultural Department of the 
State, not just to enforce the provision of the Food Part of 
it. but also as to the drug. They have never done anything in 
regard to enforcement of drugs. If you will recall the Legis- 
lative Committee, made at the suggestion of the Chief Chem- 
ist of the State. Mr. Allen, and in a conference with him and 
some other gentlemen in Kaleigh at the time he stated there 
was no money for the enforcemnt of the act so far as the 
drugs were concerned. They get funds. I guess it must be 
from other sources, probably from the fertilizing taxes, or 
from some other source for the enforcement of it, so far as 
the funds are concerned, hut we have never been able to do 
anything. Tt is a dead letter so far as the drug art i- con- 
cerned. We had a bill drawn at the last Legislature asking 
the Legislature to appropriate $6,000 for the enforcement of 
the drug part of the act, and putting the enforcement of it in 
the hands of the Board of Pharmacy of the State, and also 
fur addition that we could use a part of this fund in helping 
the enforcement of the narcotic law of the State. 

While we are all together here as I said yesterday, what 
we need is unity and thorough organization. 1 believe we 
ought to have our local organizations where the towns are 
large enough and where we might combine several counties 
and have a county organization and through those organiza- 
tions when the Legislature meets and we want an appropria- 
tion like this for enforcement of the law, let each local asso- 
ciation send a delegate down there. Let anything come up 



98 North. Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

from the State Medical Society in the Legislature — I was 
there when the first act was passed in 1880 and I have been 
there ever since. You let any act, effecting whatever the 
State Medical Society, and you have representation there 
from all sections of the State. I saw it this time, and have 
seen it every other time. By united effort they have succeeded 
in accomplishing what they want and we have not. I wish 
we in some way could get that feature. What good is that 
act at all to us. 

W. II. Wearn : The same is true in the department in 
Washington, they are paying a little attention to the food 
part of it, but not much to the drug act. 

F. W. Hancock : But Virginia and other States have 
made an appropriation for the enforcement of this act, and I 
believe we can get ir. We ought to have it and with united 
effort and with help from every section of the State I believe 
we can get some help. 

President: We had committees appointed looking to the 
same end at Morehead and they were retained at Waynesville. 
I was a member of that committee, with Mr. Sprague and 
Henry T. Hicks. I did most of the corresponding for that 
committee and in talking with them we all came to the con- 
clusion that the best thing to do was to put the money there 
ourselves, and let it be used as best we could. 

Just how much to assess a small sum in the way of a serial 
number paying for it. those made in the State and out of the 
State, taxing each one. So far as the drugs sold in my store, 
estimating there were 800 stores in the State, the sum of 50 
cents would bring about $9,000. !NTow that is a small sum 
and not enough to make those people ask for additional cost. 
Mr. Sprague and I agreed that that was the best way to get 
it. We had to have a law and therefore go to the Legislature 
for it, but we didn't frame up any law. I had a mind to 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 99 

meet with the Board of Pharmacy and draft up that law. I 
really think if a committee was appointed and let them go 
after this thing' and allow them their expenses. I think I 
paid out some $30.00 in correspondence for that thing, and 
got out a mass of information and a number of letters from 
proprietors who were willing to pay it in a serial way. Pay 
50 cents per year on every serial number. If we would put 
up a headache remedy, it would be that much and so on. 

C. D. Bkadham : Do you know that Parke, Davis & Co. 

would not pay that. 

President : They have stated that they would not ob- 
ject to it. 

W. H. Wearx : Wouldn't that come under the Interstate 
Commerce Law ? 

President: ~No, I think not. 

G. E. Burwell : In discussing the ways and means of 
increasing membership I offered a resolution at Morehead, 
which was not passed ; to the effect that we have enough copies 
of proceedings printed to send one to every registered drug- 
gist in North Carolina whether he is a member or not. I am 
convinced that a great many men are not members for lack of 
information. I believe then Ave would get the sympathy and 
co-operation of a great many men who are not members. I 
believe the proceedings this year will be far more interesting 
and I am sure it will be written up in better shape than last 
time, and it seems to me if we can afford it, that we will make 
it 700 instead of 500. Let this Committee on Membership 
take this matter in charge and address a suitable letter to 
each one of those men to go with a copy of the proceedings. 

]STo action was taken on this suggestion. 

President : If we see the necessitv of this thing, and we 



100 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

could pay it, it would be easier for us to pay it, than have a 
direct tax on us. 

F. W. Hancock: Why can the State Medical Society 
get so much, and we can't get anything? 

W. II. Wearn : The State Medical Society have such fine 
men in the Legislature that they can fight it out. 

( '. I). Bradham : Some druggists in North Carolina can go 

to the Legislature. 

V. \V. Hancock: I have always wanted to see Geo. Gran- 
tham there. The State Medical Society got $4,000 four 
years ago and this year it went to $25,000 or $30,000. 

G. K. Grantham : You know they make these people 
think they are doing something for them. 

F. W. Hancock: Yes they are now on to the hook worm 
business, and I don't believe it is as important as the pure 
food act. 

E. V. Howell: In Virginia the Agricultural Department 

takes charge of the drug inspection and out west if they want 
more money they get it. The Agricultural Department takes 
in something like $250,000 per year. Suppose each manu- 
facturer would pay $5.00 for all, and nol for each separate 
preparation. I spoke to a man at Asheville about that, and 
he said if you would make it 15 cents for each one. he would 
object, because he makes so many products. If we would 
make it $1.00 he would not object. 

President: There was not but one concern that objected 
to an amount to be paid — a specific sum. 

F. W. Hancock : You would have to change the law to do 
it. and there is no money to carry it out. 

G. K. Grantham: I think we have a pretty good plan 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 101 

already started to appoint a committtee of three and let it 'be 
their duty to get in touch and get out, not only one communi- 
cation, but various communications. Give the druggists some 
good reasons why they should attend. The committee has 
one chance at it, and I don't think they ever got out but one 
paper. I make that as a motion that a committee of five be 
appointed. 

F. W. Hancock: I wish to second that motion. 

Puesidext: I will appoint a committee of six as an aux- 
iliary committee on the Board of Pharmacy: G. K. Gran- 
tham, C, D. Bradham, W. H. Justus, H. T. Hicks, E. G. 
Birdsong, and L. H. Stowe 

F. W. Hancock: There was at least $400 saved to the 
druggists in the special tax of $500 that was knocked out. 
While on my feet I wish to state that the Kaleigh local drug- 
gists' association has been a great deal of help to us, they 
have kept in touch with us and often things would come up 
when I had gone home. They would either telegraph me or 
send me a special delivery letter, either Birdsong or Hicks. 
We arc ready at any time we need help to send a telegram or 
a letter all over the State. What I am after is a county organ- 
ization to instruct your representatives. A local organiza- 
tion like they have in Raleigh. You have one in Asheville, 
Why haven't you one in your own county? 

J. P. Stowe: I would like to suggest that there be a 
chairman for each particular county, and that that chairman 
be notified by the secretary of the Board of Pharmacy of every 
bill pending before the committee, and that the chairman of 
these different counties over the State be notified and asked 
to take the matter up at home. I take it for granted that 
when it comes to a matter of legislation they are all interested 
like we are. It is an easy matter to get up a delegation to go 
tc Raleigh, or have a number of telegrams filed into the dif- 



102 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

ferent representatives after we had notified there were some 
bills pending- there that would be a detriment to us. I think 
if the President appoints a chairman for each and every 
county over the State, and the secretary notify that chair- 
man of the bills that we would get good results. I don't be- 
lieve it would be a bad idea to be notified by the secretary of 
every bill thai should be presented. I make a motion that the 
president appoint a chairman in each county, and the chair- 
man be notified. This chairman to be a representative drug- 
gist of the county, and further in the county seat or centrally 
located where he could easily be communicated with, by 
either a telegram or 'phone. 

<i. E. Burweel: It occurs to me that this committee could 
be of considerable assistance in directing that work by hav- 
ing standard literature prepared for instructions and informa- 
tion along that line. A greal many men would not know 
how to go at it without assistance. Tf there is a chairman 
in every county, thai particular man will act quickly when 
he is notified thai there is a bill pending there that is going 
to be a detriment to his business. Mr. Hancock is the man 
that would be on to that first of anyone. This motion was 
made and seconded, but not put to a vote. 

President: I now introduce your new president, Mr. C. 
P. Harper, of Selma. 

President Harper: I want to express my appreciation 
of the high honor you have conferred upon me, and I hope I 
may be able to fill this position with credit to the Association. 
Tt has been my pleasure to be a member of this Association 
for a number of years, and I have taken more pleasure at 
this meeting than for many years, because it is a pleasure for 
me to be associated with a body of men for which I have all 
high regard. 

I was impressed with a remark a young lady waitress made 






North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 103 

this morning. I said to her : "I suppose yon will all be very 
glad when this bunch of druggists gets away?" She said, 
"]STo, we will not, because we all think it is the nicest crowd 
of men that we have ever seen together in a long time." 
I want to compliment the members of the Association on 
attending these meetings and coming through the rain from 
day to day. It shows that you are loyal to your Association, 
and thoroughly interested in the work we are trying to do, 
' and I am glad that your spirits and your ardor have not been 
dampened by the bad weather and by the late hours we have 
been keeping, as well as by the refreshments that have been 
served here. You have been optomistic at all times, and nave 
always looked on the bright side. I express the hope that the 
future holds in store for you many good things and that it 
will grow brighter and brighter for you as the days go by. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

Tin- undersigned Committee have carefully considered the sugges- 
tions in the address and submit the following: 

i. That the sale of drugs should ultimately be restricted to trained 
and legally qualified druggists. 

2. That the unnecessary dispensing by Physicians should be dis- 
couraged, as well as counter-prescribing by Pharmacists. 

3. That Legislator effecting Druggists should be initiated and fur- 
thered by them. 

4. At present the State Board of Pharmacy cannot be a full Member 
of the North Carolina Association of Boards of Pharmacy until some 
needy changes in the Pharmacy laws are changed. 

5. That the President and Secretary co-operate with Dr. Geo. P. 
Payne, Atlanta in securing better conditions for the Army Pharma- 
cist, like those obtained for the navy. 

6. That the formation of Local Associations be encouraged. 

E. V. Zokllkr, Chairman. 
J. E. Sheu,, 
Ed. Birdsong. 

Motion made and carried that the report of the Committee 
on President's Address be adopted. 



104 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Motion made that the Association pay the janitor $3.00 for 
his services. 

Secretary: T would like to ask the members what they 
think about inserting the photograph of the group taken 
yesterday. If it meets with the approval of the members, I 
will try to get a reduced cut and put it in the proceedings. 
1 would like also to get a cut of the President, and put it in 
also. 

This step met with the approval of the members. 

( '. I). Bradham: I really think the two grades of certifi- 
cates is ;i very dangerous thing, and I have thought about it 
since the meeting this afternoon. T want to make a motion 
that it is the sense of this meeting assembled that we disap- 
prove of that hill. They will not know whether T am a phar- 
macist or assistant, because we are both in the -ante -tore. It 
will tend to lower the pharmacists' -alary, because we will 
have so many young men who will he assistant pharmacists. 
Now it is going to effect the proprietors in this way, that 
these assistants taking the place of the pharmacists is going 
To throw him out of a job, and he is going to put up a store 
next door there. 

E. A'. Zoeli/er: You are speaking against the experience 

of about 35 state-. 

C. D. Bradham : You told me this afternoon, if we had 
that hill we would have cheaper clerks, and we would have 
1500 clerks in this State. 

E. Y. Zoeeler : I didn't say that. 

('. D. Bradham: I beg your pardon. T tell you right 
now you are going to make a mistake. You want more regis- 
tered men and these licentiates in the place of pharmacists. 
So vou could have two licentiates in place of one pharmacist. 






North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 105 

E. V. Zoeller : If you don't want the standard rule in 
Xortli Carolina, among the pharmacists leave it as it is. 
What is going to be the result if you raise those examination 
requirements, instead of having 30 passed, you will have L5. 
It is trouble even now to obtain good men. 

C. I). Bradiiam : Then you admit you are afraid that 
the clerk's price is going to be effected. You admit that. 

E. V. Zoeller : I am being guided by 35 or 40 other 

States. 

W. II. Weakn: Zoeller's point is well taken. As soon as 

you raise the standard to 9 months. 12 months or IS months 
in the course of college of pharmacy, you are necessarily go- 
ing to place limitation upon application when you do that, 
you make it scarce. His point is, when yon raise the stand- 
ard you are going to make it harder than it is now and then 
you will have scarcity of clerks. When you have two grade-, 
then you place it at a point where the higher grade man will 
suffer at the expense of the lower grade man, the two go 
hand in hand. The bill is drawn with reference to pre- 
requisite, that is, certain perecentage of college education and 
in doing that you necessarily place a certain limitation on a 
man's education. 

0. P. Greyer: Of course what I will state will only be 
one man's experience, and one man's say. There may be 
others that will differ from me in regard to that subject, but 
every State in which I have worked have had both classes. I 
have worked as qualified assistant and registered, both in 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and I found no hardship upon 
the higher man. The demands for higher men in those 
States, and all the States in the union — they can't supply 
those men for registered men. While they can supply a de- 
mand for qualified men. A qualified assistant can only stay 
in the store 12 hours in the absence of registered men, but 



106 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

he can run the store 12 hours, — that is under the supervision 
of the Board of Pharmacy, and also under the secretary of 
the local association. This is taken up with the Board of 
Pharmacy when he finds out a man is operating that himself. 
I was qualified as a relief man, and it is a rule for a clerk 
to have an afternoon and evening off every week, and work 
every other Sunday. In the absence of a registered man, I 
could not relieve a man for 24 hours on Sunday, for instance, 
as qualified assistant. I could only relieve as qualified assist- 
ant. If you wiin I a relief man to take a registered man's 
place, lie has to he a registered man. I never heard of any 
in ml ile or anyone taking advantage of that situation. It is 
only of short duration. 

C. D. Bkaiuia.m : Say I am a proprietor and you are a reg- 
istered assistanl and you come in the store, you could run my 
store for 12 hours and when I come back how long could I 
stay in the store before you could run it 12 hours more? 

( '. P. Gkeyek: Suppose I would run it for 12 hours, and 
you come in tin- -tore, take off your coat, you go out and stay 
another 12 hours. You are the proprietor, and the public is 
going to see that you arc neglecting your store. They are 
educated and there is also the police force, they will see that 
you are not in the store, and that I am the man always in 
the store. The first thing you know, you will get a letter 
from the Board of Pharmacy that you are allowing the quali- 
fied assistant to take charge of the store, one consecutive day, 
and your not being there but an hour or so each day. They 
have a man spotting you, and if you are found doing that 
again you are dealt with severely. It has not reduced the 
price of registered men in those States. 

J. P. Stowe : I am a graduate in pharmacy and I am a 
member of the Board and have been opposed to this. I don't 
object to the ten months' clause, my main objection being the 






North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association L07 

assistant clause. I can't feel that a man that has only two 
or three years' experience could cope with a man that has 
had four, five or six years' experience, and stood the exami- 
nations that are now put up. I can't see but that it would 
decrease the clerks' salary. I second Mr. Bradham's motion 
that that clause be left out of this bill. That we only have 
one class of clerks in North Carolina. 

Resolutions of Committee: We wish to extend thanks to 
the hotel for their prompt and courteous attention, to the 
local druggists, and the press, also to the citizens of Xew 
Bern. Also to L. T. Marsden, who travels for the Vaughan 
Robertson Drug Co., Richmond, Va., who gave as a token of 
his appreciation of courtesy shown him at this meeting, $5.00 
to the general fund. 

President Cordon asked the Auditing Committee to re- 
port. Chairman C. B. Miller did so. 

REPORT OE THE AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

We, the Auditing Committee, have audited the report of the 
Secretary of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association and find 
same correct. 

Chas. B. Miller, 
E. L. Tarkixgton. 

We, the Auditing Committee, have audited the report of the 
Secretary-Terasurer of the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy and 
find same correct. 

Chas. B. Miller, 
E. L. Tarkington. 

We, the Auditing Committee, have audited the report of the 
Treasurer of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association and find 
the same correct. 

Chas. B. Miller, 
E. L. Tarkixgton. 

Motion seconded that the janitor be paid $3.00 for his 
services. 



108 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

On motion of Mr. Zoeller the Association authorizes the 
Treasurer to allow his report to end on the 31st of the month, 
preceding the date of the annual meeting. 

The meeting' adjourned to meet in Hendersonville, ^. C, 
on June 17, 18, 19, 1914. 

J. G. Beard, Secretary. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 109 
RECEPTION IN HONOR OF DRUGGISTS. 

The following account is taken from the Xew Bern Sun: 

The beautiful reception given last evening from eight-thirty to ele- 
ven o'clock by Mr. and Airs. C. D. Bradham at their handsome colonial 
home on Union and East Front street, in honor of the delegates to 
the Pharmaceutical Convention, is to be numbered as one of the most 
elaborate and brilliant social functions ever given in New Bern. 

A wealth of flowers, artistically arranged made the house very at- 
tractive. 

The doors were opened by the daughter of the house, little Miss 
Mary Bradham and Miss Lydia Speight, daintily attired in lingerie 
frocks. In the spacious hall the guests were welcomed by Mrs. George 
Stratton, Misses Laura Ives and Mannie Baxter. Receiving with Mr. 
and Mrs. Bradham in the parlor were the wives of the local druggists, 
Mrs. Ernest Wood, Mrs. Walter Lane, Mrs. Jabez Hollowell, Mrs. 
Wm. Pinnix, Mrs. Leinster Duffy and Mrs. Daniel Henry. 

Effective decorations in the parlor were formed entirely of sweet 
peas, while a great mass of lovely roses artistically decked the library. 
Mrs. Rosomund Hancock invited the guests into .the library where 
they were received by Mrs. S. L. Dill, Jr., and Mrs. Benjamin Moore. 
The dining room was artistically decorated in nasturtiums. The mas- 
sive mahogany table with its exquisite appointments had a handsome 
cluny lace cloth, caught with bunches of nasturtiums and softly lighted 
with hanging tapers in silver candelabras. 

The handsome punch bowl filled with refreshing fruit punch formed 
the centerpiece of this attractive table which was gracefully presided 
over by Miss Mildred Ball and Mrs. John Cox, assisted by Misses Sara 
Richardson and Mary Ward. Mrs. Samuel Smallwood received in the 
dining room and was assisted by Misses Bessie Summered, Gladys 
Carter, Edna Speight, and Maud Hurley. 

Delicious cream and cake was served by Misses Ivy Willis, Lottie 
Mae Bennett, of Elizabeth City, Matilda Hancock, Alice Ward, Celia 
Moulton, Pauline Barrington and Sara Hollister. 

Worths' Orchestra furnished exquisite music during the evening. 
All sections of the State were represented and Mr. and Mrs. Brad- 
ham were kept busy in giving greetings to men and women from the 
seashore to the mountains. 

During the receiving hours the spacious rooms were literally throng- 
ed with guests who were lavish in their praise of the genuine hospitali- 
tv of the event. 



APPENDIX 



APPENDIX 



SOME OF THE BEAUTIES OF PHARMACY AND 

THE RELATION OF THE PHARMACIST AND 

THE PHYSICIAN 

By E. L. Tarkington, Wilson, N. C. 

When I was a boy I loved the atmosphere of the drug store; there 
was something refreshing about it that appealed to me. I consider 
being a pharmacist a great privilege because I loved it from my 
boyhood and on reaching manhood I still believed I have found my 
calling in this profession. 

I do not know of any profession more elevating than that of phar- 
macy; there is in it the element of service, and as we come in contact 
with suffering humaity we feel that we are brightening lives and 
relieving pain by our skill. 

If you love our old and distinguished profession with all its ups 
and downs there is nothing so sweet to the ear as the ring of the 
mortor and pestle. 

There is perhaps no science that will lead the professional man into 
broader and wider fields of thought than can pharmacy. Did you 
ever make a study of the ingredients that you come in contact with 
most every day in filling prescriptions? If you did you would take 
a trip around the world and you would visit some of the largest re- 
search laboratories in the whole country. 

If the pharmacist goes at his work in the right spirit he can derive 
real pleasure from knowing that he is helping the physician to relieve 
human suffering by the prescriptions he sends out with this parting 
thought: "Go out in the world; be of some use to some one; do good 
wherever you can." 

Let your work be your friend; your teacher. Do your work; live 
for it, love it. "Get your happiness out of your work or you will 
never know what happiness is." 

Mr. Pharmacist of this very live period in commercial and profes- 
sional activities, where are you ? 

If I were to make a suggestion that you are a "dead one" you would 
rise up and resent it quickly. 

But 1 can't help from saying that most of us are not as alive as we 
should be: Let us resolve to make our pharmaceutical meetings mean 
more to us in the future by getting up papers on different subjects of 
interest in our profession thus helping others as well as ourselves. 
Let us keep up with the advance in pharmacy and be in a position to 

8 



114 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

bring the physician in closer touch with us and show him that we are 
not mere druggists, but we are pharmacists. 

Let us go after the stay-at-home pharmacist and show him where 
his body as well as his mind can be refreshed by attending the phar- 
maceutical meetings. 

The pharmacist who works cne hundred and twelve hours to the 
week requires for his welfare and his best development, physical, 
mental, and financial, at least three days free from care and trade. 

The man who would attend the pharmaceutical meetings, but is kept 
at home by circumstances, over which he has no control, is very un- 
fortunate; the man who could go but does not, is foolish. 

Druggists who seldom, or never take a vacation get into the ruts; 
their minds get stuffy and clouded; they lose their power of growth 
and freshness of views, the ability to grasp opportunities. 

Let us increase our usefulness in this progressive pharmaceutical 
age. We must not stand still, we must develope our profession, we 
must have friendly discussion to deepen fellowship. 

Let us reason together, interchange ideas, let our fondest hopes be 
realized. If we will only put our shoulders to the wheel there is a 
bright and better day dawning. 

In pushing the- commercial cud of pharmacy let us not forget the 
professional side of it. 

Do you know what happens to the physician who stops studying the 
advancenunt> made yearly in his profession? lie becomes an old fogy 
before his alloted time. It is the same with the pharmacist who doesn't 
attend the pharmaceutical meetings, read his drug journals and phar- 
maceutical literature. 

Shall we keep on living simply at a standstill or shall we make our 
business a producer of revenue and enjoyment? 

Pharmacy if practiced in a thoughtless way is indeed a drudgery, 
like any other occupation. If you don't like your job, quit it. Sticking to 
a joli you don't like is as bad for you as it is for the job. If you can- 
not lioast make room for the fellow who can. 

If a pharmacist loves his work, and does not think he is destined 
to be something better, he will be a useful man and of great service 
in the uplift and advancement if his profession. 

Physicians all over this wide world of ours need pharmaceutical 
advisers, whom they can consult concerning disagreeable methods of 
compounding medicine for administration, their incompatibility, and 
similar questions, upon which it is difficult for them to keep posted. 

There are in the United States about forty thousand retail druggists 
and about one hundred and fifty thousand physicians. In spite of this 
army of practitioners there yet remains the fact that the masses are 
still woefully lacking in proper appreciation of the value of the phar- 
macist. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 115 

Many physicians have been inclined to forsake their pharmacists. 
Why is this? It is because the pharmacist, anxious to "get-rich quick", 
engages in other business, and having so many irons in the fire, often 
neglects his Rx department, leaving it in charge of an unregistered 
clerk. 

Professional pharmacy and farming, or similar occupations, don't 
go hand in hand. You can't give sufficient time to make a success of 
both.. If you are farming or engaged in some other occupation sell 
your drug store and devote your time to the business you are most 
interested in. A successful pharmacist must give all of his time and 
talent to his profession to do justice to it. 

Let us be proficient in our profession; let us study the demands of 
the physician and then we can command his support. 

The wide-awake retail pharmacist whose commercial and profes- 
sional activity is in keeping with the modern spirit of advancement 
doesn't have to neglect his business to be better off financially. 

Let us let the year 1913 be distinguished by our alertness in making 
our profession of the highest standard. Let us resolve for this and 
next year, and on, to make our medical doctors "sit up and take 
notice" of our eagerness to help him, to show him that when he is 
prescribing some coined name specialty that he is prescribing some 
common well-known drug in a new dress. Let us make the unlucky 
'13 a lucky one! 

We should let quality be our motto in our prescription department. 
One can understand that with such a variation in the strength of 
galinical preperations the physician cannot depend upon them. Let 
us show the physician that we use nothing but standarized products 
in our prescription department. 

I fail to comprehend how a physician, who is practicing medicine 
both for the love of the profession and the money he can derive from 
it would be willing to dispense his own drugs in preference to pre- 
scribing. 

Did you ever stop to think and did you ever remind the physician, 
who dispenses his own drugs, that he adds from $500 to $1000 to his 
annual expense account while his brother practitioner who writes pre~ 
scriptions will add aproximately that amount to his bank account. 

At least 50 per cent, of the people who get medicine from a dis- 
pensing physician nev^r pay for it. 

I believe if these conditions are discussed with the physician and if 
druggists carry the desired line of prescription material no sane phy- 
sician can object to doing an absolute prescription business. I believe 
the time ; s not far distant when, if each pharmacist does his part, 
the dispensing physician will realize the folly of his way of doing 
business and leave off the old saying "the old way of dispensing was 
good enought for my father," and for me — why change? 



116 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

We cannot expect physicians to place explicit confidence in us unless 
we compel young men to look at pharmacy as a profession. There is 
a class of young men who are shiftless, careless, dissatisfied, care noth- 
ing for the professional side of pharmacy. Why is this? 

Perhaps there are a number of causes; one is that they do not find 
pharmacy a get-rich-quick business, another that they do not like the 
long hours. 

Gentlemen the retail drug business is suffering from the want of 
pharmacists in politics. 

The medical profession does not look after our interest in the leg- 
islature in regard to making laws that affect our business. They have 
their own interests to look after, and in some cases they are looking 
after ours. 

In Tennessee, for instance, you will recall the bills adopted there in 
191 1. One of these bills gives to all assistants who have served an 
apprenticeship of five years in a drug store, irrespective of fitness, 
full registration without undertaking an examination by the Board of 
Pharmacy. Another bill allows physicians in towns, under two thou- 
sand population, to practice pharmacy. 

If that law should ever go into effect in this state I should advise 
all people living in towns under two thousand to rush to the towns 
over two thousand. 

This law was a disgrace to our profession. Tennessee, instead of ad- 
vancing has gone back fifteen years. Has North Carolina gone back? 
No — she has taken a step forward. Let us go on and on until our pro- 
fession has reached the top of perfection. 

Who is to keep up this progressive movement? Not the few who are 
doing it now — but the combined force of about seven or eight 
hundred pharmacists in North Carolina. 

As good a friend as the doctor is to the pharmacist why is it that 
we have to be present at the seat of action all the time to protect our 
interests? 

The physicians have the closest organization for mutual aid and 
benefit of any class of people in America. They have their fights, 
their differences and their troubles, but when there is an enemy in 
sight they present a solid front that is amazing. Their standpoint of 
organization is a marvel. 

The physicians have their monthly meetings and discuss their pro- 
fession and exebange ideas to enlighten each other. Why shouldn't 
we pharmacists have meetings and discuss different subjects for the 
betterment of the profession and show the physicians and the people 
our interest in our old and distinguished profession. 

Again I refer to the dispensing physician. Why will some of the 
physicians throughout the counrty continue to use old methods in prac- 
ticing medicine? Right here in North Carolina, not fifty miles from 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 117 

New Bern you will find physicians who seldom write a prescription 
and when they do write one it is because they are out of the prepara- 
tion they wanted to give or the patient is doubtful pay. 

If we only could persuade the phycician to be modern and let his 
prescription be protected by a pharmacist who could assist him in 
fighting and relieving the suffering, what a friendly and united body 
of professional men we would have. 

Mr. Pharmacist are you loyal to your physician who is writing pre- 
scriptions or are you counter-prescribing? Perhaps this is one cause 
of the physician dispensing his own drugs. Another reason may be 
that he hasn't enough confidence in his pharmacist, knowing him to 
be neglecting his profession, having some boy who has had two or 
three years experience to fill prescriptions. Another reason may be 
that the physician is narrow and doesn't believe in the "live and let 
live" policy; he has antiquated ideas. 

I am glad to say the up-to-date 20th century physicians realize the 
importance of having pharmacists to fill their prescriptions. 

If we could only convice all the physicians that we are in business 
together. The physician who has his troubles must remember that we 
have ours also; what helps one helps the other; what hurts one, hurts 
both. 

We are interdependent and we can't get as far by pulling apart as 
we can by pulling together. 

The success of association work requires labor, brains, money and 
numbers. We should be very grateful to the few men in our State 
who have given and are still giving their time to uplift the drug 
business. 

I long to see the time come when we will have two or three hundred 
pharmacists throughout North Carolina to attend the pharmaceutical 
meetings. Loyalty to our profession bids us to arise and go forward 
and not backward. The still small voice bids us to be up and doing. 



118 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

THE STORE LABLE, AND NOMENCLATURE OF 
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS 

By Richard H. Roth, Ph. G., Asheville, N. C. 

Among the important matters which demand the attention of the 
pharmacist, such as quality of his wares, cleanliness of his store, etc., 
is one which I fear receives less attention than it is entitled to. 

It is that of the labeling of the containers of medicines in the store 
for the label is our first guide to the identity of the substances we 
employ in the daily conduct of business. 

The object of the label is to display to the sight what is subse- 
quently to be confirmed by the other senses, and therefore the label is 
an article of much importance to us, and since it serves so valuable a 
purpose it should be our aim to make it as efficient as possible. 

Some of the desirable features a lable should possess are as follows: 
greatest possible contrast between the color of the lettering and the 
paper as black and white for mild preparations and red and white for 
poisonous ; simplicity and distinctness of the characters of the writing 
or printing with entire absence of decoration and flourishes; concise- 
ness in wording limiting the letters to the least number necessary to 
indicate beyond a doubt what is meant, and limiting the size to just 
sufficient to show a reasonable margin beyond the lettering. 

Labels on containers of non-poisonous drugs should be of one 
uniform shape, written or printed black on white, and those on con- 
tainers of more potent drugs it may be well to have of a distinctive 
shape or with a distinctive margin, and these should be written or 
printed red on white. In every instance the label should be carefully 
attached straight and firmly on the container, and renewed when 
it has become soiled. Where the container is a permanent one a good 
plan is to paint over the lable a coat of clear copal varnish. This will 
protect it for years in ordinary use and may be washed when soiled. 

Concerning the Nomenclature of Preparations I believe the present 
form can be improved by placing the basic or potent constituents of the 
preparation first and then the minor distinctions as to part of drug 
used nature of preparation or distinction from others of similar 
name. 

As illustrations of my suggestion I will mention a number of pre~ 
parations as I would have them written : 

Carbolicum Acidum, Hydrocyanicum Acidum, Peruvianum Balsa- 
mum, Belladonna, Emplastrum, Asafoetida, Emulsum, Aconiti Radi- 
cis, Ex. Fl. Colchici Semenis, Ext. Fl., Hyoscyamus, Ext. Pulverisa- 
turn, Strammonii Semenis Ext. Solidumm, Digitalis Infusum, Chloro- 
formi Lin. Ferri et Ammonii Acetatis Liquor, Aspidium Oleoresina, 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 119 

Aurantii Corticis Oleum, Phosphori Pilulae. Opii et Ipecacuanhae 
Pulv. Jalapae Compositus Pulvis, Mentha Viridis Spiritus, Calcii 
Lactophosphatis Syrupus, Arnica Flores Tinctura, Opii Deodorata 
Tinctura, Morphinse Compositus Pulvis, Diachylum Unguentum, Hydr- 
argyri Nitras Unguentum, Stibiatum Vinum. 

You will note that I confine myself to a short list of preparations 
only. This is for the reason that the present method of naming chemi- 
cals and natural drugs has my hearty endorsement and I do not think 
can be improved upon, because of brevity, rational form, and distinct- 
ness of meaning. 

When we see a package labeled "Adeps" U. S. "we know that this 
does not mean just 'any kind' of fat, but "The internal fat of the abdo- 
men of the hog (sus Scrofa, variety Domesticus) purefied by washing, 
melting and straining. We know that "Cantharis, U. S." is the Beetle 
"Cantharis Vesicatoria" thoroughly dried at a temperature not ex- 
ceeding 40 degrees C, and no other fly ; likewise we know that "Prunus 
U. S." is not any kind of plum or prune, but "The partly dried fruit 
of "Prunus Domestica" and none other, and so on through the phar- 
macopoeia. The simple short name stands for identity, origin, purity, 
form, species, derivation, part used, habitat, etc. 

It will be noted that according to my method as above suggested 
the eye is at once confronted with the most active portion of the prep- 
aration to be used, and the mind put on guard. Let us give a moments 
attention to Dover's powder and we find it in the pharmacopoea as 
"Powder of Ipecac and Opium or Comp. Powd. of Ipecac. It is not 
reaching very far to suppose that this could be confounded with Comp. 
Powder of Jalap but if our eye be confronted with the form 'Opium 
and Ipecac Powder' the word 'Opium' coming first should immediately 
put us on the alert. Other illustrations could easily be cited but it 
would be a useless waste of time. 

One of the principal reasons actuating me in making these sugges- 
tions is to eliminate similarities in names and forms, and encourage 
greater contrasts which would tend to reduce the likelihood of errors 
in misreading, and I would be much pleased if the subject would re- 
ceive some attention in discussions among pharmacists and physicians 
with the view of ultimate adoption, if deemed acceptable by the com- 
mittee of revision of the pharmacopoea and by physicians in prescrip- 
tion-writing. 



120 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



SOME SUGGESTION'S TO INCREASE [NTEEEST IX 
THE SALE OF DISINFECTANTS 

Eugene Rimmer. 

"An ounce of Prevention is worth a Pound of Cure." Doubtless at 
the present time this is one of the most often quoted proverbs in 
general usage. Questions of general health, sanitation, and the isola- 
tion of infectious diseases have caused untold discussions. Many 
theories, suggestions, and just as many objections have been brought 
out. But the fact still remains, that the minds of the public have been 
agitated. Every person may have a rather far fetched idea about the 
contraction or the transmission of diseases, but all believe in disin- 
fection. Disinfection, or the prevention of infection is described as the 
prevention or the communication of a disease, from one person to 
another; whether by foul or noxious exhalation, or by contact mediate 
or immediate. (Doland). 

Prevention of infection necessarily means the destruction or puri- 
fication of the infected media. The several theories of the transmis- 
sion, whether by personal contact or by clothing, or public conveniences 
all have their defendants. The means of purification are many and 
varied. Practically all in general usage have some merit. Each sani- 
tative officer may have his own favorite. To the druggist of today 
there lies a wide field, not only for professional advancement, but also 
to commercial progress. The sale of the purifying agents by rights 
belong to the pharmacist. Now through the general and ever growing 
belief in disinfectants, they grow of more commercial importance each 
day. As before mentioned, these dollars by rights should go into 
the till of the drug store, not into that of the general supply store. 
The druggists of yesterday slept and allowed the grocery stores to 
steal the spice extract business, shall we. the druggists of today, sleep 
and allow a far more important source of revenue to be filched from 
us? To retain or regain this business the druggist must deal with 
several forces : First. Popular opinion or confidence of the public. 
Secondly. An intelligent knowdedge of the field. Thirdly. Just treat- 
ment from the manufacturers of these goods in question. 

Through the sanitative officers and physicians, and through judi- 
cious advertising he can acquire the confidence of the public. Study 
some authority upon the relative worth of the various disinfectants; 
both for the subjugation of human diseases, and also those of cattle, 
horses, sheep, poultry etc. Let the housewife see that you are the pro- 
per person to consult to save her family from sickness, and let the 
farmer see that you are an authority upon the health of his live stock. 
In gaining the popular opinion, the druggist must necessarily deal with 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 121 

the second force I have mentioned. He has already prepared himself 
intelligently. There is yet a greater force to deal with. The manu- 
facturers of all these commonly used disinfectants have already gone 
directly to manufacturing plants, schools and institutions using them, 
or to those that show a likelihood of using them, and have taken orders 
direct. To a large extent they have acquired a great percentage of 
the bulk business. What right have we to suppose that they will not 
proceed to carry on a more intensive campaign, and to sell from house 
to house to the housekeeper and to the farmer? 

Now as soon as the druggist has prepared himself to the extent, 
that he thinks he can intelligently handle the field, and wishes to cope 
with these peddling manufacturers, let him pick around until he finds 
a satisfactory disinfectant or prepare a formula of his own. If he 
chooses a good disinfectant, and can guarantee to the manufacturer 
that he will secure the orders of the manufacturing firms and insti- 
tutions using disinfectants ; then it stands to reason that the manu- 
facturers will allow him exclusive control. They then will not accept 
orders, except upon his signature. Having assured himself of the 
real worth of his accepted disinfectant and having the manufacturers 
backing him, next the druggist must go out and do a little talking for 
himself. He must show the purchasing agents of the various institu- 
tions that he has a product that will be more dependable or economical, 
or whatever his strong point seems to be. Having received an order, 
and the goods having arrived; it would be a good plan to suggest that 
he would be pleased to show the employees how best to use the dis- 
infectant. Do this in a pleasant judicious manner and do not show 
officiousness. Next, keep in touch with that disinfectant, see when it 
gives out and be ready for a repeat order before another man hits 
in at the psychological moment (the moment it gives out) and gets an 
order. In the course of a year or so, the people will become so ac- 
customed to using one brand that they will reorder without sugges- 
tion, but barely, if ever the first repeat. 

The housewife deserves as much or more diplomacy. To many peo- 
ple a suggestion of disinfectants draws a reply "I keep a clean house, 
I don't need them," almost insulted, in fact. Tactfully explain that 
you understand that, but that there are many mediums of contagion 
that the housewife is not familiar with. Now the disinfectant that you 
offer to the housewife, necessarily comes in smaller quantities. The 
price is not so much now, the element. The volume of business will 
be smaller, but the percentage of profit will be larger. This disinfec- 
tant must be in a convenient package, the directions for usage, must 
be clearly and explicitly brought out, and the odor must not be offen- 
sive. Having picked out your household disinfectant, begin to adver- 
tise it through window displays, newspapers or any convenient medium. 
The placing of a printed circular in every package going to a house- 



122 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

wife is a very simple and efficient method of advertising. If this 
circular is home printed and does not bear any name except that of the 
druggist, it would tend greatly to centralize the public opinion, and con- 
fidence that the druggist wishes. As has been said before, the drug- 
gist should let the housewife see that he has studied the field that she 
should place the health of her household in intelligent hands, rather 
than in those of a person who has never studied the question. 

Next, the farmer with his live stock should become an important 
customer. The farmer of today is becoming more and more scien- 
tific each day. He chooses his fertilizers, his rotation of crops etc., 
and even the selection of his breed of stock according to rules that he 
has found most profitable. The druggist having prepared himself 
can go to him and show him how a healthy animal is of more value 
than an unhealthy one. He should show him why he should use pre- 
ventive agents and to what extent it would improve his business. 
Next, show him the relative value of his brand of disinfectant, then 
follow up his "brand" talk with the timely suggestion of the prepara- 
tion for use. To the farmers and all persons must the fact be impress- 
ed, that the druggist knows what he is talking about; and that he ha3 
studied the question and accordingly is not simply interested in dollars 
and cents, as the general store man, to advertise to the farmer mailing 
lists, signs along the country roads and the use of circulars are avail- 
able. The store at which the writer is employed places a circular of 
their "brand" in every statement that they send to the farmer. That 
is a personal and inexpensive means of advertising. 

This paper has at random, tried to bring to eyes of the druggists a 
means of more revenue, and with it the timely suggestion that some 
one is going after this business. Do the druggists of today wish to 
sleep or do they wish to go to it? "There's danger in delay." 

As a concluding suggestion, would not a concerted action of the 
druggists be of some avail to use upon the manufacturers? 

This suggestion is respectfully submitted. 



North Carolina. Pharmaceutical Association 



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ROLL OF MEMBERS 



ACTIVE 

Abernethy, J. G Lenoir 

Alexander, Oscar T Charlotte 

Adams, Edward C Gastonia 

Atwater, G. M Elizabeth City 

Ahrens, Adolph G Wilmington 

Andrews, Chas. McDonald Hillsboro 

Ashford, A. J Kinston 

Austin, T. E Roxboro 

Anderson, Joe M Xewbern 

Barnes, Hugh A Maxton 

Baldwin, Penrose : Asheville 

Brown, Joseph K Scotland Neck 

Barnhill, Mabel Bethel 

Brame, W. A Rocky Mount 

Barnes, B. S Maxton 

Bell, Frank R Elizabeth City 

Baucom, A. V, Apex 

Bermingham, Jno. S Hamlet 

Barkley, Dennis E Franklinton 

Beard, J. G Chapel Hill 

Beavans, W. E Enfield 

Bellamy, Pi. R Wilmington 

Bernard, Germain Durham 

Biggs, J. W Williamston 

Biggs, Warren H Williamston 

Birdsong, E. G Raleigh 

Blake, J. Heath Asheville 

Bolton, J. C Rich Square 

Boon, W. J Wilmington 

9 



130 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Boone, D. Leonard Durham 

Bradley, Jesse P Greensboro 

Bradly, Augustus Burlington 

Bradham, C. D l^ewbem 

Bennett, A. M Bryson City 

Bennett, K. E Bryson ( iiy 

Brame, R. M 1ST. Wilkesboro 

Barnes, E. W Kings Mountain 

Brooks, J. F Hendersonville 

Burwell, G. E Charlotte 

Burwell, W. R Charlotte 

Byrd, Clement Raleigh 

Coppedge, O. G Kinston 

( Iherry, W. C Winston-Salem 

Carmiehael, W. C Asheville 

( Ibppedge, Jno. B Greensboro 

Carter, Jesse Aberdeen 

( loppedge, Frank D Spring Hope 

( niter, Jesse Jr Aberdeen 

Cannady, Ralph C Benson 

Champion, Roy C Raleigh 

( !ox, ( J. I Warsaw 

Cherry. Jas. L Sanford 

Chalk. S. A Morehead ( Jity 

Cole, J. F Carthage 

Cook, W. M Salisbury 

Cook, R. E. L Tarboro 

Cook, A. J Fayetteville 

Cooke, H. M : Spencer 

Cordon, J. G. M Clayton 

Costner, B. P Lincolnton 

Creech, D. H Smithfield 

Owes, Eugene T Oxford 

Cutchin, J. M., Jr Whitakers 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 131 

Davenport, Lee Washington 

Davis, Jno. E Raleigh 

Davenport, P. E Plymouth 

Dawson, M. P Rocky Mount 

Dietz, Ralph Y Statesville 

Dorsey, Melville Henderson 

Duffy, F. S New Bern 

Dunn, R. A Charlotte 

Elvington, D. A Wilmington 

Eclgerton, E. O Raleigh 

Etheridge, Sidney G Elizabeth City 

Fentress, H. L Wilmington 

Foster, Caney Enfield 

Field, Gordon S J^orlina 

Fulghum, Raif ord F Kenly 

Finger, F. E Kings Mountain 

Fordham, C. C Greensboro 

Fox, Chas. M Greensboro 

Galloway, Rawleigh Raleigh 

Gardner, T. L Reidsville 

Gardner, Howard Greensboro 

Gibbs, Thos. R Belhaven 

Godwin, C. I Pine Level 

Goode, J. Alonza Asheville 

Goodman, G. C Mooresville 

Gorham, R. S Rocky Mount 

Gray, Polk C Statesville 

Grantham, Hiram Red Springs 

Grantham, G. K Dunn 

Green, W. H Wilmington 

Greyer, Chas. Peyton Morganton 

Griffin, L. C Charlotte 



132 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Griffin, Hugh A Rocky Mount 

Gurley, Doyle M Sanford 

Hall, W. F Statesville 

Home, Chas. J. O'H Greenville 

Hancock, F. W Oxford 

Hood, Paul C Dunn 

Hardin, Jno. H Wilmington 

Henderson, Jno. L Hickory 

Hart, Geo. W Lumberton 

Hart, J. A High Point 

Hamlet, Peyton R Raleigh 

Hart, Geo. W Lumberton 

Hunter, Gary K Hassell 

Harper, C. P Selma 

Harrison, E. R. V Greensboro 

Harville, R. C Thomasville 

Hauser, D. O Maxton 

Hawley, F. O Charlotte 

Hayes, W. A Hillsboro 

Haywood, L. L Durham 

Herring, W. H Clinton 

Henderson, Jas. A Charlotte 

Hicks, H. T Raleigh 

Hill, Jno. H Goldsboro 

Hilton, Chas. M Greensboro 

Hollowell, J. K Xewbern 

Hood, J. E Kinston 

Hood, D. H Dunn 

Hood, T. R Smithfield 

Hood, W. D Kinston 

Horn. W. W Fayetteville 

Horn, Ruffin Fayetteville 

Horton, W. E Charlotte 

Howell, E. V Chapel Hill 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 133 

Howerton, Jno. L Greensboro 

Hunnicutt, F. J Raleigh 

House, Joseph Scotland Neck 

Hunter, Forest V Hendersonville 

Hunter, B. W New Bern 

Hutchins, Jas. A Winston-Salem 

Hopkins, V. O Saluda 

Jetton, W. A Davidson 

Jacocks, F. G Elizabeth City 

Jones, Jno. B Fair Bluff 

Justus, W. H Hendersonville 

Knight, C. V Speed 

Kelly, Jno. K Wilmington 

Kerner, L. C Henderson 

Kendall, H. E Shelby 

Kyser, H. R. . . Rocky Mount 

Lane, Walter A Newbern 

Lafferty, Parks M Kannapolis 

Leggett, P. Southport 

Lanquist, T. E Winston-Salem 

Loftin, J. IT Troy 

Lynch, Norman W Charlotte 

Lyon, O. H Washington 

Lee, P. A Dunn 

Leggett, W. A Edenton 

Lutz, Horace C Hickory 



Murchison, Ernest E Clayton 

Matthews, G. E Siler City 

Marley, Fred. H Lenoir 

Mattox, A. McLean Greensboro 

Matton, Geo. A High Point 



134 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Marsh, M. L Concord 

May, W. A Rocky Mount 

McDonald, A. H Duke 

Mcllkenny, Thos. Cowan Greensboro 

McKesson, L. W Statesville 

McNeill, Geo. K Rowland 

McCraw, W. P Tarboro 

Martin, B. M Wake Forest 

Martin, W. S Canton 

Mayer, C. R Charlotte 

M ay, T. II Louisburg 

Miller, C. B Goldsboro 

Mullen, L. B Huntersville 

Missildine, E. E Tryon 

Moody, R. F Charlotte 

Moore, Bernice C Wilmington 

Morrow, Earle Hamlet 

Moose, A. W Mt. Pleasant 

McDonald, Jno. S Lnmberton 

Nicholson, T. H Murfreesboro 

ISTiestlie, William Wilmington 

Nowell, W. R Wendell 

O'Brien, Lex C Winston-Salem 

O'Hanlon, E. W Winston-Salem 

Overman, Harold S Elizabeth City 

Page, B. Frank Raleigh 

Patterson, Alvis Wilson 

Payne, Harry E Rocky Mount 

Pearsall, A. L Hope Mills 

Polk, Jno. B Charlotte 

Pemberton, Thos. R Greensboro 

Pickelsimer, J. B Asheville 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 135 

Pilkington, Geo. R Pittsboro 

Prior, Jack Atlanta 

Purcell, E. P Waynesville 

Purcell, S. M Salisbury 

Raysor, C. A Asheville 

Peeves, Lester A Chapel Hill 

Eea, Verne Durham 

Rogers, E. P Durham 

Reedy, John Himtersville 

Eimmer, Eugene Tarboro 

Reeves, M. H Waynesville 

Eing, C. A High Point 

Eing, W. A High Point 

Robinson, Dr. M. E Goklsboro 

Robinson, J. Linwood Lowell 

Robertson, Elbert G Lynchburg, Ya. 

Rose, Ira W Rocky Mount 

Roth, R. H Asheville 

Rudisill, J. S Cliffside 

Reid, W. W Sanford 

Smith. Claude X Durham 

Scott, Jno. M Charlotte 

Saunders, Andrew J Belmont 

Secrest, A. M Monroe 

Strayhorn, Wm. F Durham 

Sedberry, H. S Fayetteville 

Sedberry, CD Fayetteville 

Shell, J. E Lenoir 

Shell, Chas. C Salisbury 

Sheppard, Jno. W Charlotte 

Simmons, J. C Graham 

Simpson, Robt Raleigh 

Smith, Dr. T. C Asheville 






136 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Smith, Frank S Asheville 

Smith, Frank T Franklin 

Stimson, J. H Statesville 

Snuggs, W. H Albemarle 

Stowe, Jas. P .Charlotte 

Summey, K. M Dallas 

Sprague, Jno. F Ealeigh 

Sailing, A. T Wilmington 

Stowe, Lester H Charlotte 

Stowe, Harry R Asheville 

Suggs, R. B Belmont 

Stancil, J. H Selma 

Swaringen, DeWitt C China Grove 

Sally, W. U Stateville 

Smith, Leon Louisburg 

Sea well, C. C Asheville 

Tally, Hugh A Jonesboro 

Trent, Jno. A Leaksville 

Tarkinton, E. L Wilson 

Thomas, E. K Duke 

Thomas, Percy, D Fayetteville 

Thomas, William G Raleigh 

Thomas, William G., Jr Raleigh 

Thomas. ( !has. R Thomasville 

Turlington, Randal A Wilson 

Vaughan, P. W Durham 

Waters, G. W Goldsboro 

Watson, Geo. Y Southport 

Wearn, W. H Charlotte 

Webb, Clyde I Charlotte 

Webb, Richard K Charlotte 

Welfare, Sam. E Winston-Salem 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association L31 

Wheless, J. M. Warsaw 

White, Fred. L Mebane 

Whitehead, E. T Scotland Neck 

Williams, E. I Raleigh 

Williams, M. P Charlotte 

Witzell, W. L Gastonia 

Williams, H. C Canton 

White, Walter R Warrenton 

Wood, Ernest H New Bern 

Walton, Grover B Washington 

Whitehead, J. D., Jr Enfield 

Worthy, F. S Washington 

Walker, C. A Asheville 

Yearby, W. M Durham 

Yoder, Coley R Newton 

Zoeller, E. V Tarboro 



NEW MEMBERS 

Strayhorn, William F Durham 

Trent, John A Leaksville 

Birmingham, John L Hamlet 

Culpepper, Frank D Spring Hope 

Wood, Ernest H New Bern 

Lane, Walter A New Bern 

Coppedge, O. G Kinston 

Fleming, Carey H Hassell 

Coppedge, John B Greensboro 

Chalk, S. A Morehead City 

Hamlet, Peyton R Raleigh 

Bell, Frank R Elizabeth City 

Etheredge, Sidney G Elizabeth City 

Cox, C. L Warsaw 



138 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

( Jannady, Ralph C Benson 

Marley, Fred H Lenoir 

Rimmer, Eugene Tarboro 

Anderson, Joe AI New Bern 

Henderson, John L Hockory 

Hood. Paul C Dunn 

Saunders, Andrew J Belmont 

Liggett, IV ivy Southport 

Jones, John B Fair Bluff 

NWell, W. R Wendell 

Brame, William A Rocky Mount 

Brown, Joseph K Scotland Xeck 

Barnes, Hugh A Alaxton 

I [orne, ( 'has. ( )'I I Greenville 

Murchison, Ernest E Clayton 

Fulghum, Raiford T Kenly 

Foster, Caney Enfield 

Loftin, J. N Troy 

Lyon, O. H Washington 

Smith, Claude N Durham 

Davenport, Lee Washington 

Walton. Grover B Washington 



HONORARY 

( Jaspari, Prof. Charles, Jr Baltimore, Md. 

Purcell, Col. John B Richmond, Va. 

Remington, Jos. P Philadelphia, Pa. 

Venable, Prof. F. P Chapel Hill, X. C. 

Williams, John R Raleigh, K C. 

Wooten, Thomas V Chicago, 111. 

Dr. H. H. Rushy New York, N. Y. 

Beal, Prof. J. II Scio, Ohio 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 139 

ASSOCIATE 

Bodeker, J. Lansing Richmond, Va. 

Bowers, Jas. Baker Richmond, Va. 

Coble, II. F Greensboro, N. C. 

Gilpen, H. B Baltimore, Md. 

Powers, Robt. Lee Richmond, Va. 

Purcell, T. W .Richmond, Va. 

Sadelson, Geo. II Southern Pines, N. C. 

Sisemore, J. P Charlotte, N. C. 

Underwood, W. A Asheboro, K C. 

Van Gorden, Ira R Elkhart, Ind. 

Vaughan, Jos Richmond, Va. 

R< inheimer, Lee Richmond, Va. 

Richards. T. A Baltimore, Md. 



DECEASED 

Abemethy, T. R Newton, K C. 

Adams, i H., ML D Gastonia, N. C. 

Ashcraft, C. W Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Atkins, D. J Durham, N". C. 

Aycocke, M. H Louisburg, N. C. 

Bedford, Prof. P. W New York, N. Y. 

Bickett, T. W Monroe, N. C. 

Biggs, S. R Williamston, N. C. 

Blacknall, R. D Durham, N. C. 

Bobbitt, F. A Winston, 1ST. C. 

Broadfoot, T. W Fayetteville, N. C. 

Davidson, J. S. M Charlotte, N. C. 

DeVanlt. T. M Asheville, N. C. 

Duffy, F. S New Bern, N. C. 

Duffy, R. N New Bern, N. C. 

Fetzer, N. D Concord, N. C. 

Fuller, T. F., M. D Raleigh, N. C. 



140 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Furman, W. II., Jr Louisburg, X. C. 

Garrett, H. B Rockingham, X. C. 

Gidney, J. C., Ml. D Shelby, N. C. 

Gordon, E. S Wilkesboro, X. C. 

Green, C. C New Bern, X. C. 

Griffin, John M Rocky Mpimt, N. C. 

Grimes, A. 1 Thomasville, X. C. 

Grimes, B Asheville, X. C. 

Hand, W. E Charlotte, X. C. 

Hill, T. B Goldsboro, X. C. 

Hinsdale, S. J Fayetteville, X. C. 

Hood, J. C Smithfield, X. C. 

Jordan, J. V Xew Bern, X. C. 

Jordan, R. II Charlotte, X. C. 

Johnson, R. E Fremont, X. C. 

Jones, B. C Morehead City, X. C. 

King, W. H Raleigh, X. C. 

Latham, W. W Seaboard, X. C. 

Lawing, J. M., M. D Lincolnton, X. C. 

Lee, A. S Lincolnton, X. C. 

Lewter, J. T., M. D Murfreesboro, X. C. 

Lucas, II. D., M. D Black Creek, X. C. 

Lyons, II. II Asheville, X. C. 

MjcAden, J. II Charlotte, X. C. 

Miller, F. C Wilmington, X. C. 

Xadal, E. M Wilson, X. C. 

Owens, B. Bertram Winston, X. C. 

Parris, D. C Hillsboro, X. C. 

Poole, T. W Williamston, X. C. 

Quickel, John Carl Lincolnton, X. C. 

Royster, O. M f Hickory, X. C. 

Sedberry, B. E Fayetteville, X. C. 

Simmons, B. T .Weldon, X. C. 

Simpson, William Raleigh, X. C. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 111 

Smith, Charles H Greensboro, K C. 

Stewart, L Laurinburg, X. C. 

Tenny, A. K Durham, X. C. 

Thompson, V. O Winston, X. C. 

Wagner, Joe F Thomasville 

Wagoner, John M Statesville, 1ST. C. 

Wilson, William, Jr Charlotte, X. C. 

Wriston, L. E Charlotte, X. C. 

Avent, Clyde B Durham, X. C. 

Dees, W. A., M. D Marshville, X. C. 

Mfonger, James Mj Sanford, X. C. 

P( ndleton, Milo M Warrenton, X. C. 

Perry, John B Macon, X. C. 

Woodall, Junius P Charlotte, X. C. 

Yates, Silas O Morrisville, X. C. 

Blount, W. A., M. D Washington, X. C. 

Palmer, Charles K Salisbury, X. C. 



MEMBERS AND VISITORS WHO REGISTERED 

The following visitors and members signed the register on 
the last day of the meeting: 

F. W. Hancock Oxford 

C. P. Harper Selnia 

G. K. Grantham Dunn 

E. L. Whitehead Scotland Xeck 

W. II. Wearn Charlotte 

G. E. Burwell Charlotte 

C. P. Greyer Morganton 

J. R. Van Gordon Elkhart, Ind. 

Mrs. J. R. Van Gordon Elkhart, Ind. 

E. L. Tarkington Wilson 

P. A. Lee Dunn 

T. D. Culpepper Spring Hope 

A. W. Bradshaw Raleigh 



142 North. Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

R. E. Whitaker Raleigh 

J. C. Ferrell Durham 

W. AI. Yearly Durham 

J. E. Shin Lenoir 

C. D. Sedberry Fayetteville 

E. V. Zoeller Tarboro 

W. H. Justus Hendersonville 

H. H. Boom Middlesex 

Eugene Rimmer Tarboro 

E. EL Wood New Bern 

O. L. Smith ^mericus, Ga. 

G. W. Loftiu Troy 

L. A. Reeves 

A. E. Philips Atlanta, Ga. 

L. W. Philips Atlanta, Ga. 

( !has. B. Miller Goldsboro 

R. M. Brame North Wilkesboro 

J. E. M. Cordou Clayton 

W. W. Home Fayetteville 

E. M. Miller Richmond, Va. 

Paul C. Hood Dunn 

O. G. ( loppedge Kinston 

A. .1. Sanders Belmont 

Frank T. Smith Franklin 

Ira W. Rose Rocky Mount 

P. M. Vaughan Durham 

W. R. Nowell Wendell 

Robert Lee Powers Richmond. Va. 

Mabel Barnhill Bethel 

R. A. Turlington Wilson 

F. S. Duffy Few Bern 

A. J. Ashford Kinston 

H. J. Kershaw Baltimore. Aid. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Foe^e. Jr Richmond, Va. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 143 

T. F. Barnly Richmond. Va. 

Chas. ? H. Home Greenville 

H. S. Overman Elizabeth ( !ity 

S. G. Etheridge Elizabeth ( !ity 

John Rowe Raleigh 

J. L. Lawshe Raleigh 

John A. Betts Fayetteville 

L. T. Marston Richmond, Va 

E. E. Murehison Clayton 

H. A. Barnes Maxton 

P. G. Patterson Wilson 

D. M. Gnrlev Sanford 

J. W. Coppedge Raleigh 

W. A. Lane Few Bern 

J. A. Trent Leaksville 

C. II. Fleming Hassell 

J. Key Brown Scotland Neck 

O. H. Lyon Washington 

Evie Marvin Hamlet 

K. E. Bennett Bryson ( !ity 

T. A. Richards. Jr Raleigh 

E. V. Howell Chapel Hill 

R. T. Fulghum Kenly 

C. D. Bradham Few Bern 

Mrs. C. D. Bradham Few Bern 

Geo. Y. Watson Southport 

J. F. Sprague Raleigh 

Mrs. S. W. Summers Salisbury 

John S. McDonald Lumberton 

B. W. Hunter Few Bern 

Jno. H. Hill Goldsboro 

J. G. Beard Chapel Hill 

Lee Davenport Washington 

F. S. Worthy Washington 



144 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Jas. P. Stowe Charlotte 

Jabrez K. Hollowell New Bern 

Grover Bellamy Walton Washington 

Mrs. J. G. Beard Chapel Hill 



THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



Mortl) Carolina !ftoard of Jpbarmac? 

By-Laws and Rules; Examination Questions Used at New Bern, 

June 6-7, 1913; List of Registered Pharmacists; Physicians 

Holding Permits; Necrology Record; Pharmacy Law; 

Anti-Narcotic Law; New Cocaine Law. 



1913 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PHARMACY 



MEMBERS AND ORGANIZATION, 1913-1914 



COMMISSIONED BY HIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 



F. W. Hancock, Oxford Term expires April 28, 1914 

W. W. Horne, Fayetteville Term expires April 28, 1915 

J. P. StowE, Charlotte Term expires April 28, 1916 

E. V. Zoeller, Tarboro Term expires April 28, 1917 

Ira W. Rose, Rocky Mount Term expires April 28, 1918 

PRESIDENT 

Edward V. Zoeleer Tarboro 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 

F. W. Hancock Oxford 

ATTORNEY 

B. S. Royster Oxford 



REPORT OF F. W. HANCOCK 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
BOARD OF PHARMACY 



Oxford, N. C, June i, 1913. 

To His Excellency, Locke Craig, Governor— and to the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association: 

Sirs : — In accordance with the requirements of the North Carolina 
Pharmacy Law, I have the honor of submitting to your Excellency, 
and to the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, a report of the 
proceedings of the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy for the year 
ending May 31st, 1913. 

The Seventy-Ninth (79) meeting of the Board was held at the 
Haywood White Sulphur Springs Hotel, near Waynesville, N. C, on 
Friday and Saturday, June 21-22, 1912. Present E. V. Zoeller, W. W. 
Home, I. W. Rose, J. P. Stowe, and F. W. Hancock. 

Seventy-three (73) candidates appeared before the Board for exami- 
nation. The following thirty-four (34) were successful and they were 
registered and license was issued to them. 

Garland M. Atwater Oxford 

John P. Baker Raleigh 

James N. Brinkley New Bern 

John D. Birmingham Rockingham 

Herman H. Boon Benson 

C. W. Blair, (col.) Concord 

Kelly E. Bennett Bryson City 

John P. Burnett Jackson 

Stamey Carter Salisbury 

Nathan Finkelstein Goldsboro 

William L. Futrelle Wilmington 

M. T. Hawkins, Jr., (col.) Louisburg 

Claude N. Herndon Durham 

Herma L. Hicks Tarboro 

Roland H. Kolb Winston-Salem 

Luther A. Linn Landis 

Boyd M. Martin Wake Forest 

Lester B. Mullen Huntersville 

Thomas H. May Louisburg 

Charles E. Malone Burlington 

Ernest E. Murchison Maxton 



148 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Ernest Porter Concord 

Charles O. Pickard Mebane 

Eugene F. Rimmer Hillsboro 

Ralph P. Rogers Durham 

Charles B. Rhineheardt Asheville 

William H. Stallings Spring Hope 

John N. Stancill Selma 

Leon Smith Stanley 

Andrew J. Saunders Belmont 

William P. Taylor Roanoke Rapids 

Haywood P. Watson, Jr., Winston-Salem 

Jefferson D. Whitehead, Jr Enfield 

William B. Wilson Marion 

H. C. Williams Canton 

Mr. Edward V. Zoeller of Tarboro presented his Commission from 
the Governor as a member of the Board for a term of five years from 
April 28, 1912, and having also presented a certificate from the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of Edgecombe County that he had taken the 
prescribed oath of office, he entered upon the duties of the office and 
upon motion was unanimously elected President of the Board. 

The Eightieth (80) meeting of the Board was held at the Bland 
Hotel in the City of Raleigh, on December 3rd and 4th, 1912. Those 
present were E. V. Zoeller, W. W. Home, I. W. Rose, J. P Stowe, and 
F. W. Hancock. 

Sixty-four (64) candidates appeared before the Board for Exami- 
nation (which was held in the Senate Chamber). The following- 
thirty (30) having made the required 75 per cent were duly registered 
and licensed : 

Noel S. Avinger Orangeburg. S. C. 

Hugh A. Barnes Maxton 

Joseph K. Brown Greenville 

Henry D. Baker Raleigh 

William A. Burwell Warrenton 

Walter L. Barnhill Greenville 

Frank R. Bell Elizabeth City 

John B. Coppedge Greensboro 

Oscar G. Coppedge Greensboro 

Esker P. Crabtree Henderson 

Charles H. Craven Greensboro 

Joseph B. Cooper Statesville 

Caney Foster Asheville 

John C. C. Foster Tryon 

Morrison Formyduval ".Whiteville 

Pevton R. Hamlet Raleigh 



North Cum! inn Pharmaceutical Association 149 

John R. Hughes Greensboro 

Robert B. Lewis Elkin 

Frank H. Lunn Wilkesboro 

Osbourne H. Lyon Washington 

Horace R. Lewis Charlotte 

Tillman J. Mathes East Durham 

Dallas L. Perry, (col. ) Maxton 

William H. Rankin Greensboro 

Davidson G. Ridenhour Charlotte 

William F. Rogers Durham 

Charlie C. Reins Wilkesboro 

William T. Rogers, (col.) Durham 

William 0. Smith Durham 

William F. Strayhorn Durham 

PROSECUTIONS 

State vs. J. W. Gaddy 

Hearing that J. W. Gaddy of Marshville, Union County, North Caro- 
lina, was violating the State Pharmacy Law by running a Drug Store 
at that place without a registered licensed pharmacist in charge, as 
the law requires, on July 31st, 1912 I went to Alarshville and made 
an investigation and found that it was true that he was running a 
Drug Store without a licensed pharmacist in charge. After purchas- 
ing some Tr. Nux Vomica as sufficient evidence to prosecute him I 
had him indicted in the "Recorder's Court" of Monroe, North Carolina. 

The case was heard on August 13th, 1912, the said Gaddy pleading 
guilty of the charges set forth in the indictment. The case was dis- 
missed upon payment of cost and the said Gaddy put under bond of 
$100.00 for his appearance in Court one year hence to show that he 
had complied strictly with the law. Otherwise he would forfeit his 
bond. 

A large number of violations have been adjusted by correspondence 
and others by visitations. If we could only get those who are com- 
plying with the law to help us in securing evidence we would often 
be in better condition to enter suit and proceed with prosecution. 
We sometimes get information in regard to some violation but when 
we get to the place from which the information comes and call upon 
the party who has given the information, the very first thing he says 
is "now I don't want you to use me as a witness." 

Another great trouble we have is in regard to some Physicians who 
have no scruples whatever in regard to prescribing Cocaine for 
habitues, although they are not under their professional care. Some- 
times they are not even habitues but get it on these Physician's pre- 
scriptions for the sole purpose of selling it. I sincerely hope the 
Cocaine Bill as introduced by Senator Bryant of Durham County and 



150 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

which was passed by the last Legislature will help us in remedying 
this evil. 

The following Pharmacists thirteen (13) in number having died, 
their names were removed from the registered list : 

D. L. Adams Raleigh 

James W. Benson Troy 

A. H. Boyett Smithfield 

C. W. Conway Franklinton 

David R. Davis New Bern 

Walter A. Hall Kings Mountain 

Thomas C. Joyner Franklinton 

H. M. McDonald La Grange 

Murdock H. McKinnon Red Springs 

Dr. J. B. Smith Lexington 

Dr. C. A. Thomas Warrenton 

Dr. J. G. Waldrop Hendersonville 

Dr. A. S. Whitaker Biltmore 

The following re^tered pharmacists, twenty-eight (28) in number, 
failing to renew their license as required by section 19 of the Pharmacy 
Law, their names were therefore removed from the registered list : 

Joseph T. Abernethy Gastonia 

Cicero Barker Salisbury 

Benjamin A. Betts Raleigh 

Roy R. Bost Newti »n 

Madison W. Brooks Asheville 

Lawrence 11. Chewning Hendersonville 

Henry S. Eley Suffolk, Va. 

Dr. M. C. Hunter Stanley 

Walter E. 1 taley, (col.) Charlotte 

J. Mc. N. Johnson Aberdeen 

Hon. Theodore F. Kluttz Salisbury 

Daniel C. Lisk Laurinburg 

Alonzo B. Matthews Durham 

John E. Murray Durham 

John S. Pescud Raleigh 

Thos. E. Person Freemont 

Dr. M. P. Perry Macon 

D. Earle Powell Greensboro 

Nathan A. Porter Tarboro 

John L. Ranson Charlotte 

Dr. G. N. Sadelson Charlotte 

Dr. J. F. Sanderf ord Creedmoor 

Dr. William J. Strickland Moncure 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 151 

D. C. Swindell Wilmington 

J. K. Thigpen Tarboro 

William R. Winn Salisbury 

Clara W. Whitehead, (col.) Salisbury 



W. M. Wilson 



, Charlotte 



The following Pharmacists were re-registered in compliance with sec- 
tion 19 of the Pharmacy Law. 

J. Taylor Amiss Asheville 

Thomas L. Farrow, Jr., Winston-Salem 

J. E. F. Hicks Goldsboro 

Dr. C. M. Brown Washington 

Alonza L. Mansfield . . . Fayetteville 

Malcolm McKay Roxobel 

James D. Nutt Wilmington 

Lemuel A. Yancey, (col.) Winston-Salem 

The following Physicians holding permits to conduct Drug Stores in 
towns of 500 inhabitants or less, failing to renew their permits were 
dropped from the register in accordance with section 19 of the Pharma- 
cy Law: 

Dr. Zebulon M. Caviness Wakefield, Wake County 

Dr. John S. Slate Pinnacle, Stokes County 

Dr. Charles E. Wilkerson Worthville, Randolph County 

Dr. James McP. Templeton Cary, Wake County 

Dr. Ralph S. Baynes Prospect Hill, Caswell County 

Dr. William P. Simpson Centerville, Franklin County 

Dr. Arthur B. Burns Cleveland, Rowan County 

Dr. William H. Smith Bailey, Nash County 

Dr. Floyd Johnson Cerro Gordo, Columbus County 

Dr. James M. Harper Holly Springs, Wake County 

Dr. Frederick J. Pate Pembroke, Robeson County 

Dr. Roy A. Vaughan Vaughan, Warren County 

Dr. Argo H. Perry Eagle Rock, Wake County 

Dr. John Mason Boyce Polkton, Anson County 

Renewal of Permit was refused to Dr. E. McQueen Salley, of 
Saluda, Polk County, because the town of Saluda, according to the 
census, had gone beyond 500 inhabitants. 

Permits to conduct Drug Stores in towns or villages of 500 inhabi- 
tants or less were issued to the following physicians : 

Dr. Horace Palmer Vaughan, Warren County 

Dr. Jones Liftwick Moorefield Pomona Mills, Guilford County 

Dr. John Henry Peeler Faith, Rowan County 

Dr. James Robert Jerome Wingate, Union County 



152 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Dr. Aris David Nicademus Whitley Unionville, Union County 

Dr. Olive William Shellem Ansonville, Anson County 

Dr. Wadie Fadoul Courie Coats, Harnett County 

Dr. Samuel Henry Crocker Stantonsburg, Wilson County 

Dr. Thomas Bertie Avers Proctorville, Robeson County 

Dr. Romeo Hicks Harris, Rutherford County 

Dr. Andrew Jackson Smith Four Oaks, Johnston County 

Dr. Harley Gaskell Brookshire Leicester, Buncombe County 

Dr. Reuben Gray Tuttle Walnut Cove, Stokes County 

Duplicate certificate was issued to 
Lee Davenport Pactolus 

Copies of original certificates were issued to the following pharma- 
cists : 

Alfred V. Baucom Apex 

Theodore C. H. Schutt Wilmington 

Mrs. Paul B. Kyscr Rocky Mount 

Burney S. Warren Greenville 

Total Number of Physicians holding permits 64 

Candidates Examined 137 

'" Candidates who passed and were licensed . 62 

" Pharmacists reregistered 8 

" " Registered Pharmacists 897 

I herewith submit reports of the receipts and disbursements for the 
current year, as follows : 

North Carouna Board of Pharmacy 

In account with F. IV. Hancock, Trcas. 

1912 Cr. 

June 1. By ) Jalance $ 150.40 

21. By Am't Rec'd from 73 candidates examined 365.00 

Oct. 31. By am't rec'd from renewal license pharmacists.... 1,716.00 

31. By am't rec'd from renewal permits physicians 140.00 

31. By am't rec'd from duplicate certificates 1.00 

31. By am't rec'd from copies of original certificates... 4.00 

Dec. 3. By am't rec'd from 64 candidates examined 320.00 

1913 

May 31. By am't rec'd from physician's permits issued 39-00 

31. By am't rec'd from copies of the proceedings sold.. 1.00 

31. By am't rec'd re-registration J. Taylor Amiss, Ashe- 

ville 3-00 

31. By am't rec'd reregistration Thomas L- Farrow, Jr., 

Winston-Salem 3.00 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association L53 

31. By am't rec'd re-registration J. E. F. Hicks, Golds- 

boro 3 00 

31. By am't rec'd reregistration Dr. C. M. Brown, 

Washington 3 qo 

31. By am't rec'd reregistration Alonzo L. Mansfield, 

Fayetteville 3 00 

31. By am't rec'd reregistration Malcolm McKay, Roxo- 

bel 3-00 

31. By am't rec'd reregistration James D. Nutt, Wil- 
mington 3.00 

31. By am't rec'd re-registration Lemuel Alex. Yancey, 

(col.) Winston-Salem 3.00 

$2,760.40 
1912 Dr. 

June 10. To am't paid Oxford post office, stamps (699) 5.00 

21. To am't paid E. V. Zoeller, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (700) 58.49 

21. To am't paid W. W. Home, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (701 ) 70.01 

21. To am't paid I. W. Rose, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (702) 69.44 

21. To am't paid James P. Stowe, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (703) 57.60 

21. To am't paid F. W. Hancock, exp. B'd meeting 

(704) 53-05 

_'i. To am't paid C. F. Clayton, (705) 6.00 

21. To am't paid Southern Express — Expressage (706) 1.40 

July 1. To am't paid Oxford Post office — Postage (707) . . . 5.00 

ir. To am't paid Oxford Tel. Co.— Message (708) .55 

Aug. 3. To am't paid Oxford Post Office — stamps (709) . . . 10.00 

4. To am't paid Southern Express Co. — express chgs. 

(7io) 25 

15. To am't paid Oxford Post Office— stamps (711) 15.00 

25. To am't paid Western Union Tel. Co. — Telegrams 

(712) 2.10 

25. To am't paid Southern Express Co. — Express chgs., 

(713) 40 

Sept. 5. To am't paid Oxford Post Office — postage (714) 15.00 

17. To am't paid Britt Printery — printing (715) 3-75 

20. To am't paid Oxford Post Office — stamps (716) 8.00 

Oct. 4. To am't paid Everett Waddey Co., — Minute Book 

(717) 3-00 

5. To am't paid Oxford Post Office— Postage (718) . . . 6.00 



154 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

30. To am't paid Southern Express Co. — Charges on 

Ex. Books (719) 1.50 

Nov. 4. To am't paid D. G. Brummitt — Renewal Treas. bond 

(720) 4.00 

4. To am't paid Oxford Post Office — Postage (721).. 4.00 
26. To am't paid Essex Pad and Paper Co., — Ex. books 

(722) 9-24 

26. To am't paid Seaboard Air Line — Freight on Ex. 

Books (723) 1.22 

29. To am't paid Britts Printery — printing (724) 1.00 

Dec. 5. To am't paid Oxford Post Office — stamps (725) 7.00 

5. To am't paid Edwards & Broughton Co. — printing 

(726) 1.88 

5. To am't paid Britts Printery — printing (727) 3.75 

5. To am't paid Southern Express Co. — Express chgs., 

(728) ,. .70 

5. To am't paid Alfred Williams & Co. — printing (729) 1.40 

5. To am't paid W. D. Terry— Janitor (730) 5.00 

5. To am't paid C. F. Clayton (731 ) 6.00 

5. To am't paid E. V. Zoeller, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (73J) 47.28 

5. To am't paid W. W. Home, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (733) 43.95 

5. To am't paid I. W. Rose, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (734) 46.71 

5. To am't paid J. P. Stowe, exp. and per diem B'd 

meeting (735) 49-15 

5. To am't paid F. W. Hancock exp. B'd meeting (736) 25.00 
14. To am't paid Southern Express Co. — express chgs., 

(737) 35 

21. To am't paid H. Gamse & Bros.— Certificates (738) 20.00 

26. To am't paid Southern Express Co. — Express chgs., 

(739) 60 

1913 

Jan. 4. To am't paid Oxford Post Office — Postage (74°) . • . 4-00 

6. To am't paid Britts Printery — printing (741 ) 1.50 

27. To am't paid Southern Express Co. — express chgs., 

(742) 60 

Feb. 3. To am't paid Oxford Post Office— stamps (743) ■ • • 6.00 

7. To am't paid Britts Printery — printing (744) 2 -°° 

Mar. 7. To am't paid Britts Printery — printing (745) -50 

8. To am't paid Oxford Post Office— stamps (746) 500 

April 4. To am't paid Western Union Tel. Co. — Telegrams 

(7-17) 50 

8. To am't paid Oxford Post Office— postage (748) . . . 4-00 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



155 



8. To am't paid Britts Printery — printing (749)... 

May 31. To am't paid E. M. Uzzell & Co. — printing (750) 

31. To am't paid B. S. Royster — Attorney fee (751) 

31. To am't paid Seeman Printery — printing (752) . 

31. To am't paid Dues to Nat. Ass. Bd's Pharmacy 

(753) 

31. To am't paid Oxford Post Office — postage (754). 

31. To am't paid Britts Printery — printing (755) 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for June, 1912 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for June 1912.. 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for July 1912. 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for July, 1912.. 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for Aug., 1912 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for Aug., 1912.. 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for Sept., 1912 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for Sept., 1912. . 

31. To am't paid Trav. Epx. Inspector for Oct., 1912. 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for Oct., 1912.. 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for Nov., 1912. 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for Nov., 1912.. 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for Dec, 1912. 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for Dec, 1912.. 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for Jan., 1913. 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for Jan., 1913- • • 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for Feb., 1913- 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for Feb., IQI3- • • 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for March, 1913 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for March, 1913 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for April, 1913 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for April, 1913.. 

31. To am't paid Trav. Exp. Inspector for May, 1913 

31. To am't paid Per diem Inspector for May, 1913. . . 

31. To am't paid Salary as Secty and Treas. (75/) • • 

31. To am't paid Clerical Help (758) 

31. To am't Bal. on Hand 



2.00 
49-75 
25.00 
21.50 

10.00 

5-50 
2.25 
40.00 
60.00 
47-8o 
60.00 
45-75 
60.00 
51.10 
65.00 
39-30 
60.00 
48.90 
60.00 
43.20 
55-oo 
49-15 
65.00 
45.80 
55-00 
42.65 
60.00 
47-05 
60.00 
46.10 
60.00 
360.00 
200.00 
123.73 



62,760.40 



Respectfully submitted, 

F. W. HANCOCK, Sec'y-Trcas. 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF PHARMACY 



BY-LAWS 



The annual meeting shall be held on Tuesday of the week in which 
the North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association holds its annual meet- 
ing and in the same place. Other regular meetings shall be held at 
such times and places as are chosen at any of these meetings. 

Special meetings may be held when called by the President, or on 
written request of three members of the Board at such times and 
places as may be stated in the call. At special meetings, only the 
business stated in the call shall be considered. 

The officers of the Board shall consist of a President and a Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. The terms of these officers shall run through the 
period of their membership of the Board, unless the Board should 
desire to end the terms of either or both sooner. 

The President shall have general supervision of the business and 
examinations, and with the Secretary-Treasurer shall report at every 
regular meeting the matters that have had attention since the last 
meeting. 

The Secretary-Treasurer shall be the executive officer to perform 
such duties as are imposed upon him by the Pharmacy Act, and such 
others as the Board from time to time may direct. At every regular 
meeting he shall furnish a detailed statement of all receipts and ex- 
penditures for approval, and at each annual meeting a complete finan- 
cial statement of the past fiscal year's business. He shall furnish bond 
in an approved surety company for one thousand dollars, the pre- 
miums to be paid by the Board, for the faithful collection and dis- 
bursing of all funds coming into and passing from his hands. The 
bond should be filed with and remain in the custody of the President. 
He shall be the custodian of the books and papers of the Board, and 
at each annual meeting present an inventory of all the property in his 
care. This responsibility of a Secretary-Treasurer going out of office 
shall not be ended until he shall present to the Board a receipt from 
his successor for said property. 

No By-Law or Rule of the Board shall be added, changed or sus- 
pended without the concurrence of three members at a regular meet- 
ing. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 157 

BUSINESS ORDER 

Roll call and pro tent, appointments. 

Reading and approving minutes. 

Miscellaneous communications. 

Reports of officers and committees. 

Special orders. 

Unfinished business. 

New business. 

Choosing place and time of next meeting. 

Adjournment. 

RULES FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
BOARD OF PHARMACY 

Examinations shall be mainly written and divided under three heads, 
namely : 

1. Materia Medica, Posology, and Toxicology, with identification of 
vegetable and animal drugs. 

2. Practice of Pharmacy, including prescription criticism and read- 
ing, with identification of galenicals. 

3. Pharmaceutical Chemistry, with identification of chemicals. 
Written questions shall be arranged as nearly as practicable into ten 

main questions under each head, with sub-questions. 

For the purpose of grading or rating, answers to questions shall be 
valued by marks or points based on their importance, as determined 
by the judgment of the examiner. 

A general average of seventy-five per cent, with not less than fifty 
per cent under any head or department, shall be required to pass. 

No application for registration, license or permit, shall be consid- 
ered, unless made out, and duly sworn to, upon the official form of 
the Board, and accompanied by the required fee. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Given at New Bern, June 6-7, 1913. 

Published to show scope and grade of examinations. Three sittings 
are held during two days. 

In order to pass a general average of 75 per cent, with a minimum 
limit of 50 per cent, in any of the three branches is required. 

RULES GOVERNING THE EXAMINATIONS 

Candidates must not communicate in anyway with another; nor give, 
receive, or use, any unsanctioned means of information. 

Questions to examiners must be asked without moving from seat 
and loud enough for all to hear. 



158 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

Answer the questions by number, and where there are sub-divisions 
start each on new line. Proportionate credit will be allowed for partial 
answers. 

Incorrect spelling or grammar and bad handwriting will detract 
from final rating. Three hours' time allotted in which to complete 
each branch. 



PHARMACY 




Ferri Sulph. Exsic. 


3ij 


Quininae Sulphas. 


3iss 


Pulv. Rhei 


9iv 


Acidi Arsenosi 


gr. iss 


et Ft. Caps. No. LX 





M. 

Convert the quantity of each ingredient in the above prescription 
into the Metric System. 

State how you would compound? What size capsule would you 
select ? 

Describe briefly several pharmaceutical operations requiring heat, 
and its effects. 

Explain how intensity of heat may be measured. 
Give rule with examples for changing Fahrenheit to Centigrade. 
Centigrade to Fahrenheit. 

How would the following be affected by heat : Ferri Sulphas, 
Salol, Camphor, Calcium Carbonate, Ether? 

What size bottle will be required to hold i Lb. Chloroform. Sp. 

Gr. 1.49? 

State the weight of one pint. 

If 1 Lb. costs 45c. what will be the gross profit from the sale of 

it at ioc. per fluid ounce? 

One commercial ounce of Potassium Iodide dissolved in one fluid 
ounce of water will represent what per cent Potassium Iodide? 
How many grains of the solution will be required to yield 20 
grains Potassium Iodide? 

3. Olei Ricini 3 V 

Syr. Rhei Arom. 3ii 

Liq. Antisep. Alk. 3ii 

Tinct. Opii Camph. 3i 

Pulv. Acaciae 3iii 

Aq. Cinnam. q. s. ad 3ii 

M. et Ft. Emuls. 

State fully how you would prepare the above prescription. 
What are the recognized proportions of oil, water, and Acacia, to 
be used in forming the nucleus for emulsions? 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



l.v. 



Give formula to produce a four ounce, 50 per cent Cod Liver Oil 
emulsion. 

State the difference between fixed oils and fats and volatile oils. 
Give a general method of preparation for each. 
Tell which of the following are fixed and which are volatile oils : 
— Oleum Tiglii, Santali, Ricini, Theobromatis, Myristicae, Adipis, 
Hedeomae, Sassafras, Lini, Chenopodii? 

LIME. From what is it obtained and what is it chemically? 
How is Liquor Calcis prepared? What is the object of first 
washing the precipitate? Is the solution made with cold or hot 
water and why? 
What is Carron Oil? 

How and from what is Petrolatum obtained? Name the official 
forms. Name several ointments into which it enters as a base. 
Why is it used as a base in most ointments containing metallic 
salts ? 

Name ingredients and give processes of following: 
Boroglycerinum, Liquor Antisept. Alkalinus, Lotio Plumbi et 
Opii, Squibb's Diarrhoea Mixture, Sun Cholera Mixture. 
Give ingredients and process for each of the following prepara- 
tions : 

Pulvis Glycyrrhizae Co., Syr. Pruni Virginianae, Vinum Ferri 
Amarum, Tinct. Benzoini Co., Suppos. Glycerini. 
Prescription reading. 

Criticise the following prescriptions minutely for incompatibili- 
ties, error in dosage, or otherwise : 



Beta Naphthol 
Bals. Peru. 
Sulphur 



Benz. Lard q. s. ad Si 

Ft. Ungt, 

Sig: Apply locally t. i. 1 



R. Olei Terebinthinae 3iv 

Bals. Copaibae 3iv 

Alum. Exsic. 3ii 

Urotropin 3ii 

Acaciae 
Aq. Cinnam. aa q. s. ad 3iv 

M. et Ft. Emuls. 
Sig: 3i q. 4 hrs. 



R. Tinct. Strophanti™ 3i 

Sod. Iodidi 

Sod. Bromidi aa 3iv 

Elx. Lact. Pep. q. s. ad Siii 

M. et Sig: 3i in aq. q. 3 hrs. 



M. 



Bismuthi Subnit. 3v 

Liq. Antisep. Alk. 3 v i 

Zinc. Sulphocarb. 3ii 

Tinct. Opii. Deod. 3iv 

Essen. Pepsini q. s. ad 5iv 
Sig: 3ii in aq. q. 3 hrs. 



160 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



E 
H. Tinct. Digitalis 3\i 

Tinct. Ferri Chlor 3iv 

Elix Lact. Pep. q. s. ad 3ii 
M. Sig: 3i in aq. q. 4 hrs. 
13. Recognize specimens. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

1. Name four official salts which contain water of crystallization. 
State how each is affected by exposure to air. 

2. Name an official Liquor in the preparation of which chemical 
reaction occurs. Describe or give equation for the reaction. 

3. Give the physical properties of Bromine. What is the commercial 
source? How is it purified? 

Why is it necessary to use extreme care in handling it? 
Give the names of the compounds represented by the following: 
K Br, H Br, Na Br 0\ Fe Br, Li Br. 

4. What is the commercial source of solution (^\ Ammonia? 
What is formed when ammonia gas comes in contact with Hydro- 
chloric Acid? 

When Ammonium Carbonate is heated what results? 

What official product is obtained by treating Formaldehyde with 

Ammonia? 

What is the compound commonly called White Precipitate? 

5. Describe or give equation for the reaction that takes place in the 
manufacture of pills of Ferrous Carbonate. 

Why is the iron salt triturated with sugar before mixing with 

the carbonate? 

Whj do these pills change if kept on hand uncoated? 

6. What reactions occur in dispensing the following: 



Acid. Carbol. 


3i 


Sod. Biborat. 


3 i s s 


Sod. Bicarb. 


3iss 


Glycerin 


Siij 


Water 


q. s. ad 5vj 



What are Reagents, Test Solutions, Volumetric Solutions? 
Mention some volumetric solutions described in the U. S. P. 
How much normal Potassium Hydroxide solution would be 
required to neutralize 45 Cc. of half normal Hydrochloric Acid 
Solution ? 

What chemical tests will distinguish crystals of Boric Acid from 
Zinc Acetate? 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 161 

How would you distinguish chemically between Calomel and 
Bismuth Subnitrate? 

9. What tests would you employ for the detection of Wax, Stearin, 
etc., as adulterants of Oil of Theobroma? 
What is meant by the Iodine number or value of a fat or oil? 
What products result when a fixed oil, or fat is decomposed by 
an alkali? What is soap chemically? 

10. How much Mercuric Chloride is required to yield sufficient 
Yellow Mercuric Oxide for the preparation of 150 grammes of 
10 per cent Ointment? 

Hg Cl 2 +2 Na O H=Hg 0+2 Na Cl+H 2 O. 
Atomic weight of H=i, 0=15.88, Na=22.88, Cl=3S.i8, Hg=io8.5. 

11. Recognize Specimens. 

MATERIA MEDICA, TOXICOLOGY, AND POSOLOGY 

1. Give botanic name, part used, and dose of : 

Cascara Sagrada; Squill; Buchu Ergot; Rhubarb; Peppermint; 
Ipecac; Coca; Quassia; Pennyroyal. 

2. Describe and state source of following or give the official defini- 
tions : 

Oil of Theobroma; Terebinthina; Amylum ; Musk; Manna; 
Kino ; Salicin ; Tragacanth ; Aloes ; Tar. 

3. Give active principle and two or more official preparaFions of the 
following : 

Calumba; Wild Cherry; Physostigma; Ipecac; Lactucarium; 
Hydrastis; Senna; Senega; Benzoinum; Gambir. 

4. Into what official preparations do the following enter as an in- 
gredient ? 

Oil Rosemary; Tinct. Ginger; Camphor; Olive Oil; Resin Scam- 
mony; Cardamon ; Sassafras; Storax ; Resin Jalap; Cantharis. 

5. NUX VOMICA. Botanical source? Habitat? Part official? 
Alkaloids? 

Principal alkaloid and percentage drug should contain? Official 
salts of principal alkaloid? 

6. COTTON. What parts and products are official? Give Latin 
names of parts and products? Preparations of each? Medical uses 

of each? 

7. Name two each crude drugs possessing the following therapeutic 
actions : 

Astringent; Diuretic; Mydriatic; Narcotic; Tonic; Anthelmintic; 
Hydragogue ; Laxative ; Stimulant ; Sedative. 



162 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

8. Give average adult dose of each of the following : 

Tr. Belladonna; Terpin Hydrate; Croton Oil; Lithium Citrate; 
Tr. Hyoscyamus; FE. Saw Palmetto; Donovan's Solution; 
Guaiacol Carbonate; Biniodide Mercury; Lead Acetate; Potas- 
sium Nitrate; Tr. Cantharides ; Camphor Monobromate; Sodium 
Iodide; FE. Taraxacum; Heroin; Acid Hydrochloric; Acid 
Salicylic; Silver Nitrate; Tr. Nux Vomica. 

9. How do doses compare when given hypodermically, mouth, and 
rectum ? 

State doses of following by each means : 

Morphine Sulphate; Strychnine Sulphate; Atropine Sulphate; 

Sparteine Sulphate. 

10. Name poisons for which following would be used in antidotal 
treatments : 

Albumen; Mucilaginous substances; Iron and Magnesium Oxide; 
Calcium Carbonate; Milk or fatty oils; Tannin; Magnesium Sul- 
phate; Potass. Permanganate. 

11. How are all poisons sold, legally required to be labeled? 
Which poisons must be registered and their dangerous nature 
made known to purchaser? 

What are the maximum quantities of Opium, Morphine, and Co- 
caine to the fluid and avoirdupois ounces, that the Anti Narcotic 
Law permits the sale of to the public without restriction ? 

12. Recognize specimens. 



LIST OF REGISTERED PHARMACISTS IN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

REVISED SEPTEMBER 1, 1913 



PLEASE REPORT ANY ERRORS OR OMISSIONS 
IN THIS LIST. OR ANY CHANGE IN ADDRESS. 

1 -Allison, Thomas B Asheville 

2 Adams, John L Gastonia 

3 Ashford, Alfred J Kinston 

4 \ldhiser, Henry H Broadway, Va. 

5 Allen, Wm. S Reidsville 

6 Anderson, W. S., M. D Wilson 

7 Ashcraft, IT. C Marshville 

8 Austin, T. E Roxboro 

9 Andrews, Charles M Hillsboro 

10 Abernethy, Joseph G Lenoir 

11 Ahrens, Adolph G. Wilmington 

12 Adams, Edward Clarence Gastonia 

13 Ashcraft, Lee Calvin Rockingham 

14 \lexander, Oscar Taylor Charlotte 

15 Anderson. Joe Move Greenville 

16 \t water, Garland Marvin Oxford 

17 Ancrum, Edward William (col.) Maxton 

18 Andrews, Fonnie Jackson Durham 

19 Amiss, J. Taylor Asheville 

20 Avinger, Noel Sifley Orangeburg, S. C. 

21 Andrews, John Puett Albemarle 

22 Baldwin, Penrose Asheville 

23 Bullock, Thos. C, M. D Autryville 

24 Bradley, Augustus Burlington 

25 Barrett, A. F Burlington 

26 Bufwell, W. R Charlotte 

27 Blair, R. Kent Charlotte 

28 Brantly, John C Raleigh 



1G4 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

29 Bernard, Germain Durham 

30 Beavans, Wm. E Enfield 

31 Barker, Walter B Greensboro 

32 Bryan. J. W Greenville 

33 Beck, Robt. T Germanton 

34 Brooks, J. F Hendersonville 

35 I '-allew, James G Lenoir 

36 Blue, Alfred F Laurinburg 

37 I ioddie, Samuel P Louisburg 

38 Ballance, Jesse R Fremont 

39 Brame, Robert M North YYilkesboro 

40 Bradham, CD New Bern 

41 Butler, R. F New Bern 

42 Bobbitt, j. Hal Charlotte 

43 I lirdsong, Edwin G Raleigh 

44 Brandon. N. C Yancey ville 

45 Bolton. J. C Rich Square 

46 Biggs, Sylvester Rockingham 

47 Betts, James R Macon 

48 Barker, William R Salisbury 

49 Burwell, Geo. E Charlotte 

50 Bellamy, Robt. R Wilmington 

51 Bunting, J. Hicks Wilmington 

52 Bell, Geo. M., M. D Wakefield 

53 Barham, W. K Morehead City 

54 Blair, S. Oscar Monroe 

55 Bullock. D. A Wilmington 

56 Barnes, Ben S Maxton 

37 Bogue, A. G Fremont 

58 Blake, James H Asheville 

59 Byrd, Clement Raleigh 

60 Blauvelt. William H Asheville 

61 Boon. Wiley J Wilmington 

62 Bryant. William Dempsey Tarboro 

63 Brown, Benjamin W Kinston 

64 Brittain, George W Reidsville 

65 Brown, James D Goldsboro 

66 Boone. D. L Durham 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association L65 

67 Baucom, Alfred V Apex 

68 Biggs, Warren H Williamston 

69 Burton, Junius E High Point 

70 Barkley, Dennis E Franklinton 

71 Bell, Holly M Windsor 

72 Buhmann, Walter Greensboro 

73 Bogart, Malcolm N Washington 

74 Berg, Jens Southport 

75 Bright, Christopher Robert Washington 

76 Beck, William Thomas Henderson 

77 Bruce, Jefferson Hot Springs 

78 Brame, Wm. Anderson Raleigh 

79 Barnhill, Miss Mabel Bethel 

80 Beard, John Grover Chapel Hill 

81 Beatty, John Marklin Tarboro 

82 Bost, Joseph Edward Newton 

83 Bretsch, Albert Raleigh 

84 Bradley, Jesse P Greensboro 

85 Biggs, John William Williamston 

86 Bennett, A. IS.., M. D Bryson City 

87 Bradsher, William Durham Oxford 

88 Brown, Thomas Joshua (col.) Charlotte 

89 Bateman, Walter C \sheville 

90 Brown, William C Winston-Salem 

91 Barker, Ernest Jerome Rowland 

92 Barnes, Edwin Wilmer Kings Mountain 

93 Banner, John Mount Airy 

94 Battle, James Phillip, M. D Nashville 

95 Blythe, E. W Brevard 

96 Browning, Howard R Littleton 

97 Brady, Charles Alvin Newton 

98 Burnett, Baker Jethro (col.) Oak City 

99 Boon, Herman H Benson 

100 Baker, John Pescud Raleigh 

101 Blair, Clarence Walker (col.) Concord 

102 Bennett, Kelly Edwin Bryson City 

103 Birmingham, Johnnie Steele Rockingham 

104 Burnett, John Paul Jackson 



166 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

105 Brinkley, James Hackburn New Bern 

106 Brown, C. M, M. D Washington 

107 Baker, Henry Dickson Raleigh 

108 Burwell, William Armistead Warrenton 

109 ,Barnhill, Walter Lee Greenville 

110 Bell, Frank Roland Elizabeth City 

111 Barnes. Hugh A Maxton 

112 Brown, Joseph Key Greenville 

113 Brown, Henry Christopher Goldsboro 

114 Boone, John Troy East Durham 

115 Betts, John Ah in Fayetteville 

116 Carmichael, W. C Asheville 

117 Carter, Jesse Aberdeen 

118 Campbell, G. W Charlotte 

119 Cranmer, John B., M. D Wilmington 

120 Cole, J. F. Carthage 

121 Clapp, Clarence Newton 

122 Carpenter, Frank L Kings Mountain 

123 Crabtree, Clarence A East Durham 

124 Cook, A. J Fayetteville 

125 Carpenter, Robt. E Shelby 

126 Convers, Z. Y Greensboro 

127 Cate, A. S Greensboro 

128 Croom, Robt. DeYane Maxton 

129 Congdon, G. G Phoebus, Ya. 

130 Cook, R. E. L Tarboro 

131 Canady, Wm. A Swansboro 

132 Cooper, H. S. S Weldon 

133 Cohen, W. M Weldon 

134 Cook. Walter M Salisbury 

135 Cooke, i larry M Spencer 

136 , . .Cox. B. T„ M. D Winterville 

137 Cutchin. James AfcK., Jr Whitakers 

138 Cardwell, Geo. W.. M. D. (col.) . .Elizabeth City 

139 Crabtree, Gilbert Raleigh 

140 Crews, Eugene T Oxford 

141 Carpenter, Oscar B Stanly 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association L61 

142 iCarter, Samuel Salisbury 

143 Cates, Claude H Burlington 

144 Cooke, Ernest S Goldsboro 

145 Costner, Frank Leslie Gastonia 

146 Council, Commodore Thomas Durham 

147 Coppedge, James William Greensboro 

148 Cannon, Claudius Lillington Ayden 

149 Chapman, David Simeon Greenville 

150 tCnrrie, Angus D Salisbury 

151 Cordon, John G. M Clayton 

152 Chandler, Theodore Solomon Virgilina, Va. 

153 Clark. Henry Toole Scotland Neck 

154 Cox. Leland Hall Lowell 

155 Creech, Durward Heber Smithfield 

156 Costner, Beverly Pulaski Lincolnton 

157 Cashwell, Charles D Statesville 

158 Cox. Myrtle Hall Wadesboro 

159 Cherry, James Lunsford Raleigh 

160 Champion, Roy Greensboro 

161 Carter. Jesse, Jr Aberdeen 

162 Carter, E. R. (col.) Winston-Salem 

163 Coleman. William Perry (col.) Raleigh 

164 Compton, James Wesley Greensboro 

165 Chalk, Skinner Ambrose Edenton 

166 Cole. Harold Miller Carthage 

167 Clark, Claude Baxter Durham 

168 Cherry, Walter Clement Winston-Salem 

169 Coleman. Henry Grady Durham 

170 Callahan. James Red Springs 

171 Crawford, Edgar Poe High Point 

172 Cox, Garnett McLean Lowell 

173 Culpepper, Frank Douglas Spring Hope 

174 Cottle, Benjamin Jackson Wilmington 

175 Christian, Jos. Benjamin (col.) . .Winston-Salem 

176 Capehart, C. T Charlotte 

177 Carter. Stamey Salisbury 

178 Cooper, Joseph Benton Statesville 

179 Coppedge, Oscar Grady Greensboro 



168 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

180 Coppedge, John Benjamin Greensboro 

181 Crabtree, Esker Pegram Henderson 

182 Craven, Charles Hugh Greensboro 

183 Cline, Harvey Eugene Concord 

184 Canaday, Ralph Clarence Benson 

185 Cordon. Joseph Palamontane Clayton 

186 Crowell, Thomas Andrew Monroe 

187 Cox, Charlie Lea Warsaw 

188 Davis, George, M. D Beaufort 

189 I hum. R. A Charlotte 

190 Dodson, J. A. (col.) Durham 

191 Dawson. W. W., M. D Grifton 

192 Dorsey, Melville Henderson 

193 I Hum, I Icnry Kinston 

194 1 )uliy, Francis S New Bern 

195 I )u!"ly, Leinster, M. D New Bern 

196 Davis. J. E Wake Forest 

197 Daniel, F. L. (col.) Salisbury 

198 Davis, R.L,M.D Bryson City 

199 Dew, S. B., M. D Spring Hope 

200 I )ixon, Robt. L Milton 

201 Detter, Eli E Bessemer City 

202 I )avenport, Peter E Plymouth 

203 Douglas, Junius D. (col.) Rocky Mount 

204 Davis, B. Swift Charlotte 

205 Davis. Edward M Brevard 

206 Deitz, Ralph Yount Statesville 

207 Davis, Isaiah Iverson, Jr Morganton 

208 Davis. James Robert Marion 

209 Dameron, E. Lee Star 

210 Dawson, Benjamin Truet , -Tarboro 

211 Dawson, Milton Piere Tarboro 

212 Davenport, Lee Pactolus 

213 Dunston, Clive William (col.) Raleigh 

214 Dye, Maleria Elizabeth (col.) Charlotte 

215 Daniel, Elbert Clifton Zebulon 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 169 

216 Eagles, John L. (col.) Charlotte 

217 Edwards, Thomas N Charlotte 

218 Eubanks, Clyde L Chapel Hill 

219 Ellington, Cope W Raleigh 

220 Ernul McG Greenville 

221 Edwards, G. C, M. D Hookerton 

222 Everington, Geo. D., M. D Laurinburg 

223 Eldridge, Julius Winston-Salem 

224 Ellington, Richard A Madison 

225 Ellis, Orren L., M. D Eouisburg 

226 Eaton, John H. (col.) Winston-Salem 

227 Elliott, Augustus Green Durham 

228 Edgerton, Elmer Otis Raleigh 

229 Elvington, Daniel Adrian Wilmington 

230 Etheridge, Samuel Bushal Washington 

231 Eason, Charles William Troy 

232 East, John Smith Asheboro 

233 Etheridge, Sidney Gladstone Elizabeth City 

234 Fox, Ludolph G Rockingham 

235 Freeman, R. A., M. D Burlington 

236 Franklin, Orren E Charlotte 

237 Fordham. C. C Greensboro 

238 Few, Vernon Hendersonville 

239 Fields, James T Laurinburg 

240 Freeze, Rufus P Hendersonville 

241 Fetzer, Charles Reidsville 

.242 Fentress, Herbert L Wilmington 

243 Field, D. Meade Hertford 

244 Fisher, Dr. E. D Wichita, Kansas 

245 Fuller, John Wiley (col.) Charlotte 

246 Fox, Charles Michael Greensboro 

247 Fulghum, Raiford Thomas Kenly 

248 Field, Gordon Stanly Courts 

249 Fulenwider, Phifer Monroe 

250 Faulconer, Roscoe Conkling Greensboro 

251 Finger, Frederick Eli Stanley 

252 Fordham, Christopher McKinnee. . .Greensboro 



J7»» North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

253 Finger, Carl Stanley 

254 Frieze, William Scott Concord 

255 Frederick, James Robert (col.) Charlotte 

256 Fisher, Henry A. (col.) Charlotte 

257 Fetzer, Frank Goodson Wadesboro 

258 Finkelstein, Nathan Goldsboro 

259 Futrelle, William Leon Wilmington 

260 Farrow, Thomas Landon, jr. . . .Winston-Salem 

261 Foster, Caney Asheville 

262 Foster, John Calvin Coke Tryon 

263 Formyduval, Morrison Whiteville 

264 F leming, Cary Hunter Hassell 

265 ( Gregory, Richard T Stovall 

266 Goodman, Joseph F Concord 

267 Griffin, Jas. A., M. D Clayton 

268 Grantham. Geo. K Dunn 

269 < Gardner, Howard Greensboro 

270 Goodman, Geo. C Mooresville 

271 Galloway, Rawley Raleigh 

272 Grantham, Fliram Red Springs 

273 Grimes, T. W Asheville 

274 Grissom, R. Gilliam Spray 

275 Green, \Ym. H Wilmington 

276 Green, Chas. F Wilmington 

277 Grove, Charles E Biltmore 

278 Gray, Polk C Statesville 

279 Greene, John G High Point 

280 Gibson, William Z Gibson 

281 Gorham, Richard S Rocky Mount 

282 Griffin, Leonidas C Winston-Salem 

283 Grantham, Richard I Greensboro 

284 Gilbert, Loamie Benson 

285 Gibson, Eliza Gertrude McColl, S. C. 

286 Gurley, Doyle Manly Sanford 

287 Greyer, Charles Peyton Morganton 

288 Griffith, Wiltshire Hendersonville 

289 Gibbs, Thomas Ricaud Belhaven 






North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 171 

290 Gardner, Thomas Littleton Reidsville 

291 Griffin, Hugh Alexander Rocky Mount 

292 Caddy, Henry Moody Raleigh 

293 Goode, John Alonzo - Asheville 

294 Green, Herbert Cooper Louisburg 

295 Griffin, Braxton Craven Marshville 

296 Gwyn, Hugh Littlejohn Mount Airy 

297 Grantham, Lewis Irving Dunn 

298 Godwin, Clarence Ivan Pine Level 

299 Godfrey, Paul Vernon Elizabeth City 

300 Gallant, Clifton Brown Charlotte 

301 Goodrum, Cloyd Smith Davidson 

302 Houston, J. L Mount Mourne 

303 Hunter. A. B Apex 

304 Hawley, F. O., Jr Charlotte 

305 Hasty, Edward T. (col.) Monroe 

306 Henderson, James A Charlotte 

307 Hughes, C. M., M. D Cedar Grove 

308 Holliday. Robt. W Clinton 

309 Howell, Prof. E. V Chapel Hill 

310 Hood, D. H Dunn 

311 Hackney, Robt. P Durham 

312 Haywood, Chas. L Durham 

313 Harrison, A. S., M. D Enfield 

314 Home, H. R Fayetteville 

315 Home, Warren YV Fayetteville 

316 Home, Samuel R Fayetteville 

317 Hooks, Arthur, M. D Blackstone, Va. 

318 Haithcock, S. S Greensboro 

319 Hill, John H„ Jr Goldsboro 

320 i lolt, Edwin M Savannah, Ga. 

321 Hayes, Win. A Hillsboro 

322 Hood, J. E Kinston 

323 Hunter, Norman C, M. D Rockingham 

324 Hall, Thomas N Mooresville 

325 Henry. Thomas A New Bern 

326 flarget, D. A Swansboro 



172 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

327 J [art, Louis W Norwood 

328 Hall John G Oxford 

329 Hancock, F. W Oxford 

330 Hamilton, R. L Oxford 

331 Hicks, Henry T Raleigh 

332 Hunter, I',. W New Bern 

333 Hunter, Thomas B Rockingham 

334 Hambrick, AW R Roxboro 

335 Higgins, Charles M Salisbury 

336 Hood, Thomas R Smithfield 

337 Hood, William D Kinston 

338 1 lall, William F Statesville 

339 Hargrave, W. W Nashville, Tenn. 

340 Harper, Clarence P Selma 

341 Hardin, John H Wilmington 

342 Hall, James M Wilmington 

343 Herring, Doane Wilson 

344 Hollowell, Jabez K Beaufort 

345 Hunter, F. P Portsmouth, Va. 

346 Herndon, Manly D Durham 

347 Hudson, John E Kinston 

348 Hall, John D Enfield 

349 Harrison, Edroe V Greensboro 

3.^0 Hunter, Forest Y Hendersonville 

331 Holland, Willis T Mount Holly 

352 Hunter, Thomas W Norwood 

353 Herring, William Henry Clinton 

354 Hall, James Samuel Fayetteville 

355 Hardee, Aldridge Kirk Graham 

356 Hart, John Albert High Point 

357 Hand, Jasper Kennedy North Charlotte 

358 Hamlet, Reginald Raleigh 

359 Hill, Grover William Wilmington 

360 Herring, Robert Roscoe Oxford 

361 Home, William Hill Greenville 

362 Harville, Reese Courts Thomasville 

363 Hanson, Jens Kristian Wilmington 

364 Hilton, Charles McLean Greensboro 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association IT-'! 

365 Hicks, William Jacobs Goldsboro 

366 Howerton, John Landsell Greensboro 

367 Hays, Francis B Oxford 

368 Hayes, Guy Clarence Randelman 

369 Houser, Dorus Oliver Maxton 

370 Henderson, Abram J. (col.) . . . .Winston-Salem 

371 Harrison, Thomas Nicholson, Jr Littleton 

372 Hall, Samuel Patterson Lenoir 

373 Hart, George Washington Lumberton 

374 Hay, Dr. W. S Cornelius 

375 Hart, Robert Lee Henderson 

376 Hicks, Charles Glenn Raleigh 

377 Hood, Henry Cogdell Smithfield 

378 Home, Jas. Charles OTIagan Greenville 

379 House, Joseph Scotland Neck 

380 Hunter, James Boyce Charlotte 

381 Hunnicutt, Fabius Jefferson Raleigh 

382 Hutchins, James Alexander Chapel Hill 

383 Harper, J. E Smithfield 

384 Hesterly, Louis Enslow Hendersonville 

385 Horton, William Eston Durham 

386 Hairston, Jacob Wm. (col.) ..Martinsville, \ a. 

387 Hood, John Cogdell Smithfield 

388 Hopkins, Virtue Ogden Saluda 

389 Hawkins, Matt. Theodoric, Jr. (col.) Louisburg 

390 llerndon, Claude Nash Durham 

391 Hicks, Henna Lillington Tarboro 

392 Hicks, J. E. F Goldsboro 

393 Hamlet, Peyton Richmond Raleigh 

394 Hughes, John Robert Greensboro 

395 Hood, Paul Cunningham Dunn 

396 Henderson, John Leland Hickory 

307 Hurst, Hugh F Richmond. Va. 

398 Iseley, George Alfred Burlington 

399 Johnson, A. S Smithfield 

400 Justus, W. H Hendersonville 



174 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

401 Johnson. James I Raleigh 

402 Jacocks, F. G Elizabeth City 

403 Johnson, R. M Scotland Neck 

404 Jarman, J. F Wilmington 

405 Jones, W. A. (col.) Winston-Salem 

406 Judd, J. M., M. D Fuquay Springs 

407 Jones, H. E. (col.) Vsheville 

408 Jetton, William A Davidson 

409 Jones. E. J Kershaw, S. C. 

410 Jenkins. Joseph Van Wilmington 

411 James, Sidney Taylor (col.) Durham 

412. Jenkins, Lawrence Wilson Henderson 

413 James, Albert Allison Winston-Salem 

414 Jones, George Thomas (col.) Raleigh 

415 Johnson, William Luther Greensboro 

416 Jarrett, Lloyd Montaville Andrews 

417 Jones, John Barnes Fair Bluff 

418 Jones, Alpheus Warrenton 

419 Jones, Joseph Hunter Reidsville 

420 Kidd. W. W Charlotte 

421 King - , H. L Durham 

422 Kendrick. T. W Charlotte 

423 Kerner, L. C Henderson 

424 Kent, A. A.. M. D Lenoir 

425 Klutz, P. J.. M. D Maiden 

426 King, ( ). G Raleigh 

427 Kyser, P. B Rocky Mount 

428 Kendal], H. E Shelby 

429 Kendall, B. H Shelby 

430 Klutz. E. E., M. D Troutman 

431 Kingsbury, W. R Wilmington 

432 Kluttz. A.J Greensboro 

433 King, C. H Durham 

434 Koonce, John E Chadbourn 

435 King, Leon Major Knoxville, Tenn. 

436 Kennedy. Henry P., Jr. (col.) Xew Bern 

437 Kelly. John Robertson Monroe 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association LY5 

4 38 Kerr, James Wilmington 

439 King, James Robert East Durham 

440 Kyser, Howell Royster Rocky Mount 

441 Knight, Charles Vernon Speed 

442 Kolb, Roland H Winston-Salem 

443 Lee, A. M., M. D Clinton 

444 Lyday. W. M., M. D Penrose 

445 Leggett, W. A Edenton 

446 Leggett, P. O Southport 

447 Leggett, K., M. D Hobgood 

448 Lewis, H. W., M. D Jackson 

449 Lee, Allen Fuquay Springs 

450 Leslie, W. A Morganton 

451 Laubenheimer, J. H Jersey City, N. J. 

452 Lutterloh, I. H„ M. D Sanford 

453 Landquist. T. E Winston-Salem 

454 Lucas, J. W Wilson 

455 Lawing, K. L Lincolnton 

456 LeBoo. P. S. (colored) Wilmington 

457 Latham, A. C Belhaven 

458 Lynch. X. W Charlotte 

459 Lee, L. V, M. D Lattimore 

460 Love, Thomas L., Jr., (col.) Raleigh 

461 Lee, Permillas A Dunn 

462 Leavister, Thomas O Raleigh 

463 Love, J. H. (col.) Raleigh 

464 Lane, Walter Allen New Bern 

46o Lutz, Horace Cleveland Hickory 

466 Lewis, Wilson Edgar Rocky Mount 

467 Lyon, Robert Phillips Wadesboro 

468 Lafferty, Parks Moore Kannapolis 

469 Lea, Lumartin John Roxboro 

470 Layden, Hugh Winborn Spray 

471 Lof tin, James Urus Troy 

472 Lord, Charles Alric Wilmington 

473 Lane, William C North Wilkesboro 

4/4 Linn, Luther Alexander Landis 



1 76 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

475 Lunn, Frank Halliburton Wilkesboro 

476 Lewis, Robert Bell Elkin 

477 Lyon, Osborne Henry Washington 

478 Lewis, Horace Reginald Charlotte 

479 Lentz, Frontis Mooresville 

480 McMinn, James M Asheville 

481 Moody, W. F Charlotte 

482 Mauney, C. J Albemarle 

483 Matthews, T. A., M. D Castalia 

484 .McLaughlin, D. A Charlotte 

485 Murphey, W. E., M. D Corbett 

486 Marsh, M. I Concord 

487 Merritt, E. S Durham 

488 McLeod, Gilbert, M. D Carthage 

489 Mabry, W. A Durham 

490 Matthews, G. E Siler City 

491 McKethan, J. A. M. D Fayetteville 

492 McXair, W. L. (col.) Greensboro 

493 A [ontague, G. B Garner 

494 Miller, Charles B Goldsboro 

4 ( >5 MacKay, D. Mc N Asheville 

4 ( >i> Menzies, E. B. Hickory 

497 Martin. W. S Canton 

498 Matton, G. A High Point 

499 Mann, J. D High Point 

500 Mclver, J. A Jonesboro 

501 Martin, S. L., M. D Leaksville 

502 Miller, E. H Mooresville 

503 Morphew, M.F..M.D Marion 

504 Moose. A. W Mount Pleasant 

505 McKesson, L. AY Statesville 

506 Montague, G. W Durham 

507 McClenahan, W. A Norfolk, Va. 

508 McNair, W. R Henderson 

509 May. W. A Rocky Mount 

510 Mitchenor, J. A Edenton 

511 McXair, AM H Tarboro 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 177 

512 Missildine, E. E Tryon 

513 Munds, J. C Wilmington 

514 Munds, W. C Wilmington 

515 Moore, B. C Wilmington 

516 Mintz, M. B Wilmington 

517 McKeel, C. B Columbia 

518 McKay, H. H Dunn 

519 Mayer, C. R Charlotte 

520 McKjnnon, W. L Wadesboro 

521 Moore, C. E., Jr Wilson 

522 McCauley, M. E Monroe 

523 McLarty, Eugene Haw River 

524 McNeil' G. McK Rowland 

525 McMillan, John D.. Jr Lumberton 

526 Moore, William H Wilmington 

S27 Miller, Carl T Wilmington 

528 McNeil, George R Vineland 

529 McNair, Frank W. (col.) Greensboro 

530 McGhee, George F Wendell 

531 McMullen, Oscar, M. D Elizabeth City 

532 Mc Craw, William Polk Tarboro 

533 Morrison, [Matthew Stuart Wilson 

534 Marsh, Numa Frank Ramseur 

535 . . . . • McKinney, William Merrimon Ayden 

536 Martin, Earle Wall Wadesboro 

537 Mayo, Thomas H Greensboro 

538 Moody, Robert Franklin Charlotte 

539 Marion, John Ernest Mt. Airy 

540 McLarty, Howard Monroe 

541 Morrow, Earl Hamlet 

542 Middleton, David Nicholson . . .Hot Springs, Va. 

543 McDonald, John Steadman Raleigh 

544 McArthur, Robert Milton Winston-Salem 

545 Morgan, Ralph Siler Brevard 

546 Michaels, A. H Durham 

547 McGuire, Thomas Talbot Southern Pines 

548 Mcllhenny, Thomas Cowan Greensboro 

549 McLelland, John Howard Mooresville 



178 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

550 Morrow, Norman Gastoma 

551 McKethan, Hecton McAllister Fayetteville 

552 Mattock, Albert McLean New Bern 

553 McKnight, Leonia Erastus Fayetteville 

554 Morton, Joseph Xerxes Charlotte 

555 McDonald, Lochiel Cameron Durham 

556 Matthews, Walter Forest Siler City 

557 McDonald, Angus Henry Durham 

558 Murphy, John Carpenter . . Hickory 

559 McManus, M. T. Y Greensboro 

560 Moore, John Patrick Smithfield 

561 Martin. Boyd Macon Wake Forest 

562 Mullen, Lester Boyd Huntersville 

563 May, Thomas Hilliard Louisburg 

564 M alone, Charles Everette Burlington 

565 Murchison, Ernest Edwin Clayton 

566 Mathes, Tillman Judson East Durham 

567 Mansfield, Alonzo L Fayetteville 

568 McKay, Malcolm Roxobel 

569 McMullan, Francis Hunter Asheville 

570 Mayerberg, Emil Rosenthal Goldsboro 

571 Marley, Fred Harold Lenoir 

572 Marston, Richard Henry Henderson 

573 Mitchell, Henry Gather Louisburg 

574 Nichols, X. W Brevard 

575 Nottingham, G. S Portsmouth, Va. 

576 Niestlie, William Wilmington 

577 Nicholson, A. T Tarboro 

578 Nowell, Edwin Greensboro 

57^ Nicholson, T. H Murfreesboro 

580 « Nowell, William Robert Wendell 

581 Nicholson, Michael Albright Biscoe 

582 Norman, J. Standing, M. D Bladenboro 

583 Nutt, James D Wilmington 

584 O'Hanlon, E. W Winston-Salem 

585 Oates, George, M. D Grover 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 170 

586 O'Brien, Lex C Winston-Salem 

587 Overman, Harold Speight Elizabeth City 

588 Pelham, S. D Asheville 

589 Parker. G. E., M. D Benson 

590 Purcell, E. P Charlotte 

591 I 'urcell. S. M Salisbury 

592 Patterson, Alvis Wilson 

5^3 1 Vrry, W. M Elizabeth City 

594 Perry, PL H. (col.) Fayetteville 

5^5 Page, B. Frank Greensboro 

5% Powell, D. A Goldsboro 

597 Powell, J. W Goldsboro 

598 Palmer, R. W., M. D Gulf 

599 Parker. W. W Henderson 

600 Perry, E. B Littleton 

601 Pleasants, F. R Louisburg 

602 Pilkington, G. R Pittsboro 

603 Pearsall, A. L. Hope Mills 

604 Parker, F. W Raleigh 

605 Plummer, James Salisbury 

606 Perry. H. W r Yanceyville 

607 Pemberton, T. R Greensboro 

608 Pinnix, J. M Kernersville 

609 Pike, J. W High Point 

610 Patterson, Wallace D Chapel Hill 

611 Powell, James B Oxford 

612 Peele, James F LaGrange 

613 Payne. Max T Greensboro 

614 Parker, Roland H Durham 

615 Pittman, Henry Hampton Fairmont 

616 Parsons, Frederick Calvin Wadesboro 

617 Parker, Richard Smith Murphy 

618 Prior, Jackson L Atlanta, Ga. 

619 Pinnix, William Maple New Bern 

620 Pickelsimer, Jesse Benjamin Brevard 

621 Pope. Henry Lennon Lumberton 

622 Powers, Leonidas Bruce Wake Forest 



180 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

623 Preston. W. Dean Norfolk, Va. 

624 Femberton, Samuel Patrick Lexington 

625 Porter. Clifford Concord 

626 Payne, Henry Eugene Rocky Mount 

627 Peacock, Moses Albeon Benson 

628 Pfaffiin, M. A Indianapolis, Ind. 

629 Polk, John Bunnie Charlotte 

630 Propst, Grier Caldwell Salisbury 

631 Phillips, Calvin Bynum Lincolnton 

632 Pittman, Joseph Nicholas Oxford 

633 Porter, Ernest Concord 

'>34 Pickard, Charles Otis Mebane 

(>3? Patterson, James H. (col.) Winston-Salem 

( »36 Perry, Dallas Leary ( col. » Fayetteville 

(h^T Quinn, Flay Dewitt Shelby 

638 Raysor, C. A Vsheville 

639 Reese, A. B Charlotte 

640 Rowland. G. J Henderson 

641 Rhinehart, M. T Asheville 

642 Roberts. A. R Gatesville 

643 Robinson. M. E., M. D Goldsboro 

644 Ring, W. A High Point 

645 Rutherford, L. A., M. D. (col.) Kinston 

646 Reedy. John Lowryville, S. C. 

647 Robertson, F. H Roanoke Rapids 

648 Reaves, L. E Raeford 

649 Reeves, Jefferson Waynesville 

650 Ring, L. B Mount Olive 

651 Royster, S. S., M. D Shelby 

652 Reeves. Thomas H Weaversville 

653 Rea, Verne Durham 

654 Roth. Richard H Asheville 

655 Reid. William W Sanford 

656 Ring. J. W., M. D Elkin 

657 Ring, Clifton A High Point 

658 Redding, Ernest F Lucama 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 181 



659 Reeves, Melvin Hezekiah. 



Waynesville 



™ ^ Ira WinfieId Rocky Mount 

001 Robinson, Gordon Costlier Charlotte 

662 Robinson, John Linwood Lowell 

663 Richardson, Luther Wyatt Selma 

?* Ri ^ s ' Henr y Augustus ". Durham 

665 Riggan, Roy Daniel \ Raleigh 

*5 Roberson, George Beard Greensboro 

667 R oss, Charles Leon \ vden 

668 Rudisill, Jones Solomon Cliffside 

669 Reinhardt, Robert Lee Forest City 

5? Rh y ne > Wa ? ne Frank Asheville 

671 Robertson, Elbert Guy Raleigh 

672 Reece, Henry Carlton Raleigh 

673 Rucker, Zackary Briscoe Rutherfordton 

6 't Rhodes ' Cader Jacksonville 

6 i° Reeves, Lester Abner Chapel Hill 

6/6 Rhineheardt, Charles Bais Asheville 

677 R^rs. Ralph Peel Durham 

6 ^ 8 Rimmer, Eugene Freeland Hillsboro 

679 Rogers, William Fletcher Durham 

680 Reins > Charlie Cicero North Wilkesboro 

681 Ridenhour, Davidson Giles Charlotte 

682 Rogers, William Thomas (col.) Durham 

683 Rankin, William Howard Greensboro 

684 Smith, T. C, M. D Asheville 

f° Smith, W. G Asheville 

686 Smith, F. S Asheville 

687 Sisk, C. T Andrews 

688 Snuggs, W. H Albemarle 

689 Stroud, T. H Burlington 

690 Scott, John M Charlotte 

691 Sheppard, J. W Charlotte 

692 Stowe, J. P Charlotte 

693 Sanders, T. F Clinton 

694 Swaringen, DeWitt C China Grove 

69 $ Sexton, C. H., M. D Dunn 



182 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

696 Skinner, R. E. L West Durham 

697 Summey, Ptolemy Dallas 

698 Sledge, R. S Draper 

699 Sedberry, CD Fayetteville 

700 Sedberry, H. S Fayetteville 

701 Sykes, A. J Greensboro 

702 Sykes, Eugene Greensboro 

703 Smith, F. T Franklin 

704 Smith, Charles H Charlotte 

705 Simmons, J. C Graham 

706 Shuford, C. M Hickory 

707 Sprague, J. F Raleigh 

708 Shell. J. E Lenoir 

709 Stevens, J. H Knoxville, Tenn. 

710 Simpson, C. X., Jr Monroe 

711 Streetman. J. W Marion 

712 Stroud, (). B., M. D Ore Hill 

713 Shore, M. L Raleigh 

714 Simpson, Robert Raleigh 

715 Simpson, T. S Winston-Salem 

716 Sloop, L. L Shelby 

717 Shaffner, H. F Winston-Salem 

718 Stimson, Logan Statesville 

719 Staton, L. L., M. D Tarboro 

720 Sasser, L. B Wilmington 

721 Smith, J. A.. M. D Wilmington 

722 Stone, A. H Spray 

723 Smith, F. L Concord 

724 Streetman, T. L Winston-Salem 

725 Stewart, W. M Charlotte 

726 Sedberry, H. B Wilmington 

727 Spencer^ W. B Norfolk, Va. 

728 Seawell, C. C Asheville 

729 Sauls, M. M Ayden 

730 Snipes, Edward P., M. D Jonesboro 

731 Stanley, John H., M. D Four Oaks 

732 Seagle, F. M Hickory 

733 Schutt, T. C. H Wilmington 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association L83 

734 Shelton, Claude F Chadbourn 

735 Scoggin, Lewis A Louisburg 

736 Smith, Thomas L Plymouth 

7^>7 Steere, L. E Charlotte 

738 Stanback, Thomas M Spencer 

739 Suggs, Robert B Belmont 

740 Suttle, Julius Albert Lincolnton 

741 Shade, Isaac Albert (col.) Asheville 

742 Shepperd, Hayden Albert Monroe 

743 Secrest, Andrew McDowd Monroe 

744 Smith, Newman Alonzo Charlotte 

745 Sykes, Ralph James Greensboro 

746 Sample, William Amazon Statesville 

747 Sappenfield, William Alfred Concord 

748 Stowe, Luther Holland Charlotte 

749 Salley, Frank Maner Asheville 

750 Sloan, Frank Alexander Jonesboro 

751 Sailing, Aaron Thomas Wilmington 

752 Shell, Charles Christian Lenoir 

753 Shaw, Clarence Edward (col.) Charlotte 

754 Shepperd, James Edgar Flushing, N. Y. 

755 Sneed, Paul C Durham 

756 Stewart, J. Marcus Fayetteville 

757 Southerland, Odell Charlotte 

758 Salley, William Moss Statesville 

759 Scott, Edward Guerrant Spray 

760 Smith, Claude Norman Durham 

761 Stimson, John Halbert Statesville 

762 Summey, Kelly Nims Dallas 

763 Spencer, John Elbert Durham 

764 Shelton, Jasper Caswell High Point 

765 Swindell, Edmund Slade Swan Quarter 

766 Smith, Casper Lumberton 

767 Singletary, Walter O Burgaw 

768 Stimson, Joseph Norwood Statesville 

769 Stallings, William Herbert Spring Hope 

770 Smith, Leon Stanley 

771 Standi, John Harvey Selma 



184 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

772 Sanders, Andrew Jefferson Belmont 

773 Stowe, Harry Reid Belmont 

77 A Smith, Edward Warren Pilot Mountain 

77? Strayhorn, William Fletcher Durham 

776 Smith, William Oscar Durham 

777 Thomas, E. R Duke 

778 Thompson, A. J Graham 

779 Thomas, J. T Henderson 

780 Tucker, W. M High Point 

781 Temple. R. H., M. D Kinston 

782 Thomas, W. G., Sr Raleigh 

783 Tull, John Waynesville 

784 Taylor, J. 1 Oxford 

785 Tarkington, E. L Wilson 

786 Tucker, R. H Reidsville 

787 Turner, W. D Cooleemee 

788 Thompson, P. A Winston-Salem 

789 Trotter. P. L Pilot Mountain 

790 Turlington, R. A Wilson 

791 Tally, Hugh A Jonesboro 

792 Teague, M. F Asheville 

793 Thomas, John X Warrenton 

794 Thomas, Percy Durand Fayetteville 

795 Trotter, James Robert Salisbury 

796 Thrower, Hiram Eldridge Henderson 

797 Tugwell, James Benjamin Lillington 

798 Tart, D. Whitfield Roseboro 

799 Taylor, Charles Albert Leaksville 

800 Triplett, Ralph Houch Marshall 

801 Temple, Jasper Owen Kinston 

802 Townsend, James Herbert Red Springs 

803 Tyson, George Franklin Mocksville 

804 Tillett, Ernest Noell Durham 

805 Taylor, Daniel Graves Leaksville 

806 Thomas, William Graham, Jr Raleigh 

807 Toms, Bate Carpenter Rutherfordton 

808 Thomas, Charles R Thomasville 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 185 

809 Taylor, William Pleasant Roanoke Rapids 

810 Tucker, William Wright Concord 

811 Thomas, Eugene Ernest Roxboro 

812 Trent, John Andrew . . Leaksville 

813 Turner, Thomas Arnold Durham 

814 Vaughan, P. W Durham 

815 Vinson, Emmett Ljttleberry Halifax 

816 Walker, T. A Charlotte 

817 Webb, Paul Shelby 

818 Wheeler, L. B Asheville 

819 Wearn, W. H Charlotte 

820 Williams, J. T., M. D. (col.) Charlotte 

821 Williams, Morrison P Charlotte 

822 Williams, S. W Raleigh 

823 White, J. A Mooresville 

824 Whittington, J. M East Bend 

825 Watson, J. B., M. D Raleigh 

826 Williston, J. T. (col.) Fayetteville 

827 Williams, W. V Goldsboro 

828 Wooten, J. L Greenville 

829 Walker, C. A Asheville 

830 Wootten, G. R Hickory 

831 Welborne, W. P Lexington 

832 Walker, Lewis Milton 

833 Williston, F. O. (col.) Salisbury 

834 Williams, R. I Raleigh 

835 Worthen, B. S Spencer 

836 Webb, C. I Charlotte 

837 Whitehead, E. T Scotland Neck 

838 Watson, D. I., M. D Southport 

839 Watson, G. Y Southport 

840 Wheeless, J. M Farmville 

841 Wright, S. P., M. D Wilmington 

842 Watson, H. P Winston-Salem 

843 White, H. G Elm City 

844 Wilkins, W. R North Wilkesboro 



180 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

845 Whitaker, Luther T., M. D Enfield 

846 Woodruff, Theodore C Charlotte 

847 Webb, James S Wadesboro 

848 Wood, Ernest H New Bern 

849 Watkins, \Y. O Rutherfordton 

850 Worthy, Ford S Washington 

851 WOlfe, Drayton Rutherfordton 

852 Welfare, Samuel E Winston-Salem 

853 White, Frederick L Mebane 

854 Whitfield, William C, M. D Grifton 

855 Webb, Eugene Lea Roxboro 

856 Walters. John Marion Burlington 

857 Warren, Burney Simon Greenville 

858 Wright, George Fitchett Elizabeth City 

859 Wetzell, William Louis Gastonia 

860 Wiley, Robert Edgar Southern Pines 

861 Wagner, Joseph Fife Thomasville 

862 Watson, Burke Latta, S. C. 

863 Walton, George Bellamy Washington 

864 Waters, George Walter, fr Goldsboro 

865 Webb, Richard Kendrick * Charlotte 

866 Wharton, Lee Alexander Gibsonville 

867 White, Walter Rodwell Warrenton 

868 Wilson, Thomas 1 larvev Thomasville 

869 Wilkerson, Joseph Lawrence Durham 

870 Wilson, Connie Hugh Greensboro 

871 Williams, Archibald Hunter Arrington,. .Oxford 

872 White, George Spencer High Point 

873 Wohlford, Herbert Williams. . . .Winston-Salem 

874 Wolfe, John C Waxhaw 

875 Westbrook, George Albert Greensboro 

876 Wheless, Robert Edmund Lee . . . .Spring Hope 

877 Wilkerson, Ira Otis Durham 

878 Watson, Haywood Parker, Jr. . AVinston-Salem 

879 Whitehead, Jefferson Davis, Jr Enfield 

880 Williams, Hezekiah Charles Canton 

881 Wilson, William Brown Marion 

882 White, Julian Elder Raleigh 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 187 

883 Whitley, Lawrence Butler . . .Washington, D. C. 

884 Williams, Benjamin (col.) Raleigh 

885 Wolfe, William Samuel Mount Airy 

886 Yearby, W. M Durham 

887 Young, John Salisbury 

888 Yarborough, A. C Spring Hope 

889 Young, Guilford E., M. D Forest City 

890 Yancey, Darcey Cecil, (col.) Wilson 

891 Yoder, Coley R Newton 

892 Yates, Cicero Lucius Kittrell 

893 Yancey, Lemuel Alexander (col.) Wiston-Salem 

894 Zoeller, E. Y Tarboro 

895 Zollicoffer, A. R., M. D Weldon 

896 Zuckerman, Isaac Louis Durham 

897 Zollicoffer, Dallas Bancroft, M. D Weldon 






LIST OF REGISTERED PRACTICING PHYSICIANS 



Living in Towns of Not More Than 500 Inhabitants, to Whom Permits 
Have Been Granted to Conduct Drug Stores 

i.... Dr. Samuel Henry Crocker Stantonsburg .. Wilson 

3.... Dr. Wadie Fadoul Courie Coats Harnett 

5 Dr. Charles Emmet Lyday Rosman . .Transylvania 

6 Dr. Lytle Calwell Adams Kittrell Vance 

7.... Dr. Benjamin Lafayette Long Hamilton Martin 

8 Dr. Charles Fortune Gold Ellenboro . . Rutherford 

9 Dr. Robert Franklin Warren Prospect Hill. . .Caswell 

10.... Dr. Cornelius Henry Brantley Bailey Nash 

1 1 .... Dr. Nathan Hardy Andrews Pembroke Robeson 

12 .... Dr. Isaac Erastus Burnett Mars Hill Madison 

13 Dr. Clifton Otis Champion Mooresboro . . Cleveland 

14 Dr. Rezin Delmere Patterson Liberty Randolph 

1 5 Dr. John W. Wood Boiling Sp'gs. . Cleveland 

16. . . .Dr. Lowrenser Dowe Floyd Cerro Gordo. .Columbus 

17. . . . Dr. 1 lorace Palmer Vaughan Warren 

18.... Dr. Jones Leftwick Moorefield Pomona Mills. .Guilford 

19 Dr. Lloyd Pecemas Russell Arden Buncombe 

20 Dr. John Henry Peeler Faith Rowan 

21.... Dr. Solomon Spainhour Flynt Rural Hall ....Forsythe 

22. . . .Dr. James Robert Jerome Wingate Union 

23.... Dr. Aris David Nicademus Whitley Unionville Union 

24 Dr. James Henry Harper Snow Hill Greene 

25 ... . Dr. Alvier William Shellem Ansonville Anson 

26 Dr. Thomas Bertie Avers Proctorville .. Robeson 

27. . . .Dr. James Henry Teague Whittier Swain 

28 Dr. Romeo Hicks Harris Rutherford 

29 Dr. Andrew Jackson Smith Four Oaks ....Johnston 

30.... Dr. Harley Gaskell Brookshire Leicester ... Buncombe 

31 .... Dr. Reuben Gray Tuttle Walnut Cove . . . Stokes 

32 Dr. Joseph Walker Floyd Tabor Columbus 

36 Dr. Emmanuel Alvin Hauser Fallston Cleveland 

37 ... ■ Dr. William Davis Lovett Montezuma Avery 

39 Dr. Oscar J. Copening Granite Falls . . . Caldwell 

47 Dr. Wesley Monroe Stone Dobson Surry 

49 Dr. H. Beauregard Ferguson Halifax Halifax 

52 Dr. I. Wallace Mayerberg Pine Level Johnston 

53 Dr. Wilbur Burdett Robertson Burnsville Yancey 

55. . . .Dr. Richard Epaphroditus Timberlake. . Youngs ville . . Franklin 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 189 

58 Dr. Martin Luther Matthews Cameron Moore 

59-... Dr. Joseph Ira Coleman Hurdle Mills. .. .Person 

60.... Dr. James Edwin Kerr Lilesville Anson 

61 .... Dr. Asa Cornelius Whitaker Julian Randolph 

64. . . .Dr. James Bryan Outlaw Middlesex Nash 

66. . . .Dr. Albert Gideon Woodard Princeton .... Johnston 

68 Dr. Charles Zackariah Chandler Dillsboro Jackson 

70 Dr. Marcus Tobius Hickman Hudson Caldwell 

73 Dr. Thomas Abram Boaz Stoneville . . Rockingham 

76 Dr. Parrott Rastus Hardee Stem Granville 

77 Dr. Julius Jackson Barefoot Swepsonville Alamance 

78 Dr. Carlie Raswell Young Angier Harnett 

79-... Dr. Emmett Wrightman Gibbs Mooresboro .. Cleveland 

81 Dr. William Dolby Kellam Union Hertford 

82. . . .Dr. Julian Rush Sutton Elk Park Mitchell 

83 .... Dr. Thomas Jefferson Proffitt Elk Park Avery 

84 Dr. William Burdett Chapin Townsville Vance 

85 Dr. Joseph Thompson Creedmoor . . . Granville 

86. . . .Dr. William Thomas Grigg Lawndale .... Cleveland 

88 Dr. Bayard Cleveland Johnson Bunn Franklin 

89.... Dr. Ayer Whitley Mint Hill. .Mecklenburg 

91 Dr. Tilon Vance Moore Acme Columbus 

93 Dr. Benjamin Robinson Graham Wallace Duplin 

95 ■ • • ■ Dr. Joseph Robert Hester Knightdale Wake 



NECROLOGY RECORD 

(From Registered List) 



D. L. ADAMS 
Raleigh 

JAMES W. BENSON 
Troy 

A. H. BOYETT 

Smith field 

C. W. CONWAY 

Franklinton 

D. R. DAVIS 

New Bern 

WALTER A. HALL 
Kings Mountain 

T. C. JOYNER 
Franklinton 

H. M. MCDONALD 
La Grange 

M. H. McKINNON 
Red Springs 

DR. J. B. SMITH 
Lexington 

DR. C. A. THOMAS 
Warrenton 

DR. J. G. WALDROP 
Hendersonville 

DR. A. S. WHITAKER 
Biltmore 



AN ACT TO REVISE, CONSOLIDATE, AND AMEND 
THE PHARMACY LAW 



The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section i. That the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association, and the persons composing the same, shall 
continue to be a bod}' politic and corporate, under the 
name and style of the North Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association, and by said name shall have the right to 
sue and be sued, to plead and be impleaded, to purchase 
and hold real estate and grant the same, to have and 
to use a common seal, and to do such other things and 
perform such other acts as appertain to bodies corpor- 
ate and politic, not inconsistent with the Constitu- 
tion and laws of the State. 

Sec. 2. That the object of said Association is to 
unite the pharmacists and druggists of this State for 
mutual aid, encouragement and improvement, to en- 
courage scientific research, develop pharmaceutical tal- 
ent, to elevate the standard of professional thought and 
ultimately restrict the pratice of pharmacy to properly 
qualified druggists and apothecaries. 

Sec. 3. That every person who shall engage in the 
sale of drugs, chemicals and medicines shall be held 
responsible for quality of all drugs, chemicals and 
medicines he may sell or dispense, with the exception 
of those sold in original pacakages of the manufac- 
turers, and also those known as "patent or proprietary 
medicines;" and should he intentionally adulterate, or 
cause to be adulterated, or exposed to sale, knowing the 
same to be adulterated, any drugs, chemicals or medical 
preparations, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and 
liable to a fine not exceeding one hundred dollars, and 
in addition thereto his name shall be stricken from 
the register of licensed pharmacists, provided he be 3 
licensed pharmacist. 

SEC 4. That it shall be unlawful for any person not 
licensed as a pharmacist within the meaning of this 
act to conduct or manage any pharmacy, drug or chem- 
ical store, apothecary shop or other place of business 
for the retailing, compounding or dispensing of any 
drugs, chemicals or poison, or for the compounding of 



Body politic 



Corporate 
powers 



Objects of associ- 
ation 



Responsibility of 
druggists for pur- 
ity of drugs, etc. 



Intentional adul- 
teration a misde- 
meanor 



Penalty 



Unlawful for un- 
licensed pharma- 
cist to conduct or 
manage drug store, 
compound pre- 
scriptions, etc. 



192 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



Unlawful for own- 
er or manager to 
permit same 



Proviso as to li 
censed physician 



Wholesale dealers 



Other exceptions 



Proviso as to 
towns under five 
hundred inhabit- 
ants 



physicians' prescriptions, or to keep exposed for sale 
at retail any drugs, chemicals or poison, except as here- 
inafter provided, or for any person not licensed as a 
pharmacist within the meaning of this act to com- 
pound, dispense or sell at retail any drug, chemical, 
poison or pharmaceutical preparation upon the pre- 
scription of a physician or otherwise, or to compound 
physicians' prescriptions except as an aid to and under 
the immediate super vision of a person licensed as a 
pharmacist under this act. And it shall be unlawful 
for any owner or manager of a pharmacy or drug 
store or other place of business to cause or permit any 
other than a person licensed as a pharmacist to com- 
pound, dispense or sell at retail any drug, medicine or 
poison except as an aid to and under the immediate 
supervision of a person licensed as a pharmacist : Pro- 
vided, however, That nothing in this section shall be 
construed to interfere with any legally registered prac- 
titioner of medicine in the compounding of his own 
prescriptions, nor with the exclusively wholesale busi- 
ness of any dealer who shall be licensed as a pharma- 
cist or who shall keep in his employ at least one person 
who is licensed as a pharmacist, nor with the selling at 
retail of non-poisonous domestic remedies, nor with the 
sale of patent or proprietary preparations which do not 
contain poisonous ingredients, nor with the sale of poi- 
sonous substances which are sold exclusively for use 
in the arts or for use as insecticides when such sub- 
stances are sold in unbroken packages bearing a label 
having plainly printed upon it the name of the contents, 
the word "Poison," the vignette of the skull and cross 
bones and the name of at least two readily obtainable 
antidotes: Provided, further, That in any village of 
not more than five hundred inhabitants the Board of 
Pharmacy may grant any legally registered practicing 
physician a permit to conduct a drug store or pharmacy 
in such village, which permit shall not be valid in any 
other village than the one for which it was granted, 
and shall cease and terminate when the population of 
the village for which such permit was granted shall 
become greater than five hundred: And provided fur- 
ther, That the Board of Pharmacy may, after due in- 
vestigation, grant to any legally registered practicing 
physician in towns or villages of not more than five 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 193 



hundred, and not exceeding six hundred inhabitants, a 
permit to conduct a drug store or pharmacy in such 
town or village subject to the provisions of this act. 

Sec. 5. That the Board of Pharmacy shall consist of 
five persons licensed as pharmacists within this State, 
who shall be elected and commissioned by the Governor 
as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 6. That the members of the present Board of 
Pharmacy shall continue in office until the expiration of 
their respective terms, and the rules, regulations and 
by-laws of said board, so far as they are not inconsis- 
tent with the provisions of this act, shall continue in 
effect. 

Sec. 7.- That the North Carolina Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation shall annually elect a resident pharmacist 
from its number to fill the vacancy annually occurring 
in said Board, and the pharmacist so elected shall be 
commissioned by the Governor and shall hold the office 
for the term of five years and until his successor has 
been duly elected and qualified. In case of death, resig- 
nation or removal from the State of any member of 
said Board of Pharmacy, the said board shall elect in 
his place a pharmacist who is a member of said North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association, who shall be com- 
missioned by the Governor as a member of the said 
Board of Pharmacy for the remainder of the term. It 
shall be the duty of a member of the Board of Phar- 
macy, within ten days after receipt of notification of his 
appointment and commission, to appear before the 
Clerk of the Superior Court of the county in which he 
resides and take and subscribe an oath to properly and 
faithfully discharge the duties of his office according 
to law. 

Sec. 8. The Board of Pharmacy shall organize by 
the election of a president and a secretary and treas- 
urer, both of whom shall be members of the said board, 
and they shall hold their offices until their successors 
shall have been elected and qualified. The Secretary 
and treasurer shall give bond in such sum as may be 
prescribed by the board, conditioned for the faithful 
discharge of the duties of his office according to law, 
and said bond shall be made payable to the North Car- 
olina Board of Pharmacy and approved by the president 
of said Board. The said board shall hold an annual 



Towns not exceed- 
ing sis hundred 
inhabitants 



Board of 
Pharmacy 



Present board, con- 
tinuance in office, 
etc. 



Vacancy, how 
filled 



Oath of office 
President and 
secretary and 
treasurer 



Bond of secretary 
and treasurer 



194 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



Annual meetings 



Additional meet- 
ings 



Common seal 



Powers of Board 



Record of proceed- 
ings 



Record of licen- 
tiates 



Register and books, 
evidence 



Annual report 



Salary of secre- 
tary 



Compensation of 
members 



meeting at such time and place as it may provide by 
rule for the examination of candidates and for the dis- 
charge of such other business as may legally come 
before it and said board may hold such additional 
meetings as may be necessary for the examination of 
candidates and for the discharge of any other business. 

Sec. 9. That the Board of Pharmacy shall have a 
common seal, and shall have the power and authority to 
*definc and designate non-poisonous domestic remedies, 
adopt such rules, regulations and by-laws, not incon- 
sistent with this act, as may be necessary to the regula- 
tion of its proceedings, and for the discharge of the 
duties imposed under this act, and shall have power and 
authority to employ an attorney to conduct prosecutions 
and to assist in the conduct of prosecutions under this 
act, and for any other purposes which said board 
may deem necessary. The said Board of Pharmacy 
shall keep a record of its proceedings and a register of 
all persons to whom certificates of license as pharma- 
cists and permits have been issued, and of all renew- 
als thereof; and the books and register of the said 
board, or a copy of any part thereof, certified by the 
secretary, attested by the seal of said board, shall be 
taken and accepted as competent evidence in all the 
courts of the State. The said Board of Pharmacy 
shall make annually to the Governor and to the North 
Carolina Pharmaceutical Association written reports 
of its proceedings, and of its receipts and disburse- 
ments under this act and of all persons licensed 
to practice as pharmacists in this State. A majority 
of the board shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of all business. 

Sec. 10. That the secretary of the Board of Phar- 
macy shall receive such salary as may be prescribed by 
the board and shall be paid his necessary expenses 
while engaged in the performance of his official duties. 
The other members of the said board shall receive the 
sum of five dollars for each day actually employed in 
the discharge of their official duty and their necessary 
expenses while engaged therein : Provided, That the 
compensation and expenses of the secretary and mem- 



*Note— The words printed in different type in Section 9 
were passed as an amendment to the Pharmacy Law by the 
lire of 1907. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



L95 



bers of the said Board of Pharmacy and all disburse- 
ments for expenses incurred by the said board in car- How paid 
rying into effect and executing the provisions of this 
act shall be paid from and out of the fees received by 
the said board. 



Sec. ir. Upon information that any provision of this 
act has been or is being violated, the secretary of the 
Board of Pharmacy shall promptly make investigations 
of such matters, and, upon probable cause appearing, 
shall hie complaint and prosecute the offender. All 
fines and penalties prescribed in this act shall be re- 
coverable by suit in the name of the people of the 
State. 

Sec. 12. That the Board of Pharmacy shall be en- 
titled to charge and collect the following fees : For the 
examination of an applicant for license as a pharma- 
cist, five dollars ; for renewing the license as a pharma- 
cist, two dollars ; for issuing a permit to a physician to 
conduct a drug store in a village of not more than five 
hundred inhabitants, three dollars; for the renewal of 
permit to a physician to conduct a drug store in a vil- 
lage of not more than five hundred inhabitants, two 
dollars. All fees shall be paid before any applicant 
may be admitted to examination or his name placed 
upon the register of pharmacists, or before any license 
or permit or any renewal thereof may be issued by the 
said board. 

Sec. 13. That every person now licensed or regis- 
tered as a pharmacist under the laws of this State 
shall be entitled to continue in the practice of his pro- 
fession until the expiration of the term for which his 
certificate of registration or license was issued. Every 
person who shall hereafter desire to be licensed as a 
pharmacist shall file with the secretary of the Board of 
Pharmacy an application, duly verified under oath, set- 
ting forth the name and age of the applicant, the 
place or places at which and the time he has spent in 
the study of the science and art of pharmacy, the ex- 
perience in the compounding of physician's prescrip- 
tions which the applicant has had under the direction 
of a legally licensed pharmacist, and such applicant 
shall appear at a time and place designated by the 
Board of Pharmacy and submit to an examination as E 



Prosecutions for 
violation of this 
act 



Fines and penal- 
ties, how recover- 
able 



Fees to be paid in 
advance 



Duration of 
license 



Application for 
license 



196 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



Qualifications of 
applicants 



Proviso as to at- 
tendance on school 
or college of phar- 
macy 



Minimum experi- 
ence required 



When license to he 
issued 



License without 
examination 



Proviso as to qual- 
ification 



Proviso as to fees 



Power to refuse 
license 



to his qualification for registration as a licensed phar- 
macist. The application hereinafter referred to shall 
be prepared and furnished by the Board of Pharmacy. 
Sec. 14. That in order to become licensed as a 
pharmacist, within the meaning of this act, an appli- 
cant shall not be less than eighteen years of age, he 
shall present to the board satisfactory evidence that he 
has had three years' experience in pharmacy under the 
instruction of a licensed pharmacist, and he shall also 
pass a satisfactory examination before the Board of 
Pharmacy: Provided, however, That in the case of 
persons who have attended a reputable school or college 
of pharmacy the actual time of attendance at such 
school or college of pharmacy may be deducted from 
the time of experience required, but in no case shall 
less than two years' experience be required for a reg- 
istration as a licensed pharmacist. 

Sec. 15. That if an applicant for license as a phar- 
macist has complied with all the requirements of the 
two preceding sections, the Board of Pharmacy shall 
enroll his name upon the register of pharmacists and 
issue to him a license which shall entitle him to prac- 
tice as a pharmacist up to the first day of September 
next ensuing, as provided in this act for the annual 
renewal of every registration. 

Sec. 16. That the Board of Pharmacy may issue 
license to practice as pharmacists in this State, without 
examination, to such persons as have been legally regis- 
tered or licensed as pharmacists by other Boards of 
Pharmacy: Provided, That the applicant for such li- 
cense shall present satisfactory evidence of the same 
qualifications as are required from licentiates in this 
State, and that he was registered or licensed by exam- 
ination by such other Board of Pharmacy, and that 
the standard of competence required by such Board of 
Pharmacy is not lower than that required in this State: 
Provided, further, That applicants for license under 
this section shall, with their application, forward to the 
secretary of the Board of Pharmacy the same fees as 
are required of other candidates for license. 

Sec. 17. The Board of Pharmacy may refuse to 
grant a license to any person guilty of felony or gross 
immorality, or who is addicted to the use of alcoholic 



jS'oiilt Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



l'.f 



liquors or narcotic drugs to such an extent as to render 
him unfit to practice pharmacy; and the Board of Phar- 
macy may, after due notice and hearing, revoke a li- 
cense for like cause or any license which has been pro- 
cured by fraud. 

Sec. 18. That every certificate or license to practice 
as a pharmacist, and every permit to a practicing phy- 
sician to conduct a pharmacy or drug store in a village 
of not more than five hundred inhabitants, and every 
last renewal of such license or permit shall be conspic- 
uously exposed in the pharmacy or drug store or place 
of business which the pharmacist, or other person 
to whom it is issued, is the owner or manager, or in 
which he is employed. Every licensed pharmacist who 
desires to continue in the practice of his profession, and 
every physician holding a permit to sell drugs in a vil- 
lage of not more than five hundred inhabitants shall, 
within thirty days next preceding the expiration of his 
license or permit, file with the secretary and treasurer 
of the Board of Pharmacy an application for the re- 
newal thereof, which application shall be accompanied 
by the fee hereinbefore prescribed. 

Sec. 19. That if the Board of Pharmacy shall find 
that an applicant has been legally licensed in this 
State, and is entitled to a renewal thereof, or to a 
renewal of a permit, it shall issue to him a certificate 
attesting that fact. And if any pharmacist shall fail, 
for a period of sixty days after the expiration of his 
license to make application to the Board for its renewal, 
his name shall be erased from the register of licensed 
pharmacists, and such person, in order to again become 
registered as a licensed pharmacist shall be required to 
pay the same fee as in the case of original registration. 
And if any holder of a permit to sell drugs in a village 
of not more than five hundred inhabitants shall fail, for 
a period of sixty days after the expiration of his per- 
mit, to make application for the renewal thereof, his 
name shall be erased from the register of persons hold- 
ing such permits, and he may be restored thereto only 
upon the payment of the fee required for the granting 
of original permit. The registration of every license 
and every permit issued by the Board shall expire on 
the thirty-first day of August next ensuing the grant- 
ing thereof. 



Revocation of li- 
cense 



License to be 
conspicuously 
exposed 



Application for 

renewal of license 



When renewal to 

issue 



Failure to apply 
for renewal, name 



After erasure, 
fee required for 

renewal 



Failure to apply 
in towns of less 
than five hundred 
inhabitants, eras- 
ure and restora- 
tion 



Expiration of 
license 



IMS 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



Power of Board to 
Issue license or 
permit after revo- 
cation 



Unlawful to sell 
certain poisonous 
substances, except 
as prescribed in 
this section 



When lawful 



Record of 
poison 



["Proz'ided, that the Board of Pharmacy, in its dis- 
cretion, shall have the power to issue a license or per- 
mit, or renewals thereof, to any person whose license 
or permit, has been revoked by operation of law or by 
the Board of Pharmacy, or whose renewal thereof has 
been refused by the Board of Pharmacy, after the ex- 
piration of one year from the date of such revocation 
of license or permit, or refusal of a renewal thereof, 
upon satisfactory proof that such person is entitled 
to such license or permit, or to a renewal thereof."] 

Si-c. 20. That it shall be unlawful for any person to 
sell or deliver to any person any of the following de- 
scribed substances or any poisonous compound, combi- 
nation or preparation thereof, to-wit : The compounds 
and salts of arsenic, antimony, lead, mercury, silver 
and zinc, oxalic and hydrocyanic acids and their salts, 
the concentrated mineral acids, carbolic acid, the essen- 
tial oils of almonds, pennyroyal, tansy and savine, cro- 
ton-oil, creosote, chloroform, chloral hydrate, canthar- 
ides, or any aconite, belladonna, bitter almonds, colchi- 
cum, cotton root, conium, cannabis indica, digitalis, hy- 
oscyamus, mix vomica, opium, ergot, stramonium, or 
any of the poisonous alkaloids or alkaloidal salts or 
other poisonous principles derived from the foregoing, 
or cocaine or any other poisonous alkaloids or their 
salts, or any other virulent poisons, except in the man- 
ner following: It shall first be learned by due inquiry 
that the person to whom delivery is made is aware of 
the poisonous character of the substance, and that it is 
desired for a lawful purpose, and the box, bottle or 
other package shall be plainly labeled with the name of 
the substance, the word "Poison," and the name of the 
person or firm dispensing the substance. And before 
a delivery is made of any of the following substances, 
to-wit, the compounds and salts of arsenic, antimony 
and mercury, hydrocyanic acid and its salts, strych- 
nine and its salts, and the essential oil of bitter al- 
monds, there shall be recorded in a book kept for the 
purpose the name of the article, the quantity delivered, 
the purpose for which it is required as represented by 
the purchaser, the date of delivery, the name and ad- 

*Note -The above paragraph in brackets was an amend- 
ment passed bv the Legislature of 1911. (Chapter 48 Public 
Laws 1911.) 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



199 



dress of the purchaser, the name of the dispenser, which 
book shall be preserved for at least five years and shall 
at all times be open to the inspection of the proper of- 
ficers of the law : Provided, however, That the forego- 
ing provision shall not apply to articles dispensed upon 
the order of persons believed by the dispenser to be 
lawfully authorized practitioners of medicine or dent- 
istry: And provided also, That the record of sale and 
delivery above mentioned shall not be required of man- 
ufacturers and wholesalers who shall sell any of the 
foregoing substances at wholesale ; but the box, bottle 
or other package containing such substances, when sold 
at wholesale, shall be properly labeled with the name of 
the substance, the word "Poison," and the name and ad- 
dress of the manufacturer or wholesaler : Provided, 
further, That it shall not be necessary to place a poison 
label upon or to record the delivery of the sulphide 
of antimony or the oxide or carbonate of zinc or lead, 
or of colors ground in oil and intended for use as paint, 
or Paris green, when dispensed in the original pack- 
age of the manufacturer or wholesaler, or calomel, 
paregoric, or other preparations of opium containing 
less than two grains of opium to the fluid ounce, nor in 
the case of preparations containing any of the sub- 
stances named in this section when in a single box, 
bottle or other package, or when the bulk of two fluid 
ounces or the weight of two avoirdupois ounces does 
not contain more than an adult medicinal dose of such 
poisonous substance. 

Sec. 21. That every proprietor or manager of a drug 
store or pharmacy shall keep in his place of business 
a suitable book or file, in which shall be preserved for 
a period of not less than five years the original of every 
prescription compounded or dispensed at such drug 
store or pharmacy. Upon the request of the prescrib- 
ing physician, or of the person for whom such pre- 
scription was compounded or dispensed, the proprietor 
or manager of such drug store or pharmacy shall fur- 
nish a true and correct copy of such prescription, and 
said book or file of original prescriptions shall at all 
times be open to the inspection and examination of 
duly authorized officers of the law or other persons 
authorized and directed by the Board of Pharmacy to 
make such inspection and examination. 



Preservation of 
record 



Proviso as to 
practitioners 



Manufacturers 
and wholesale 
dealers 



Proviso as to la- 
beling paints 



Proviso as to poi- 
sons in medicinal 
percentages 



Prescription files 
required 



Cop j' of prescrip- 
tions 



Prescription files 
open to inspection 



200 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



Unlawful for non- 
licentiate to use 
or exhibit title 



Conducting: drug 
stores, etc., con- 
trary to provisions 
of this act a mis- 
demeanor 



Each week consti- 



Cempounding con- 
trary to this act 
a misdemeanor 



Fraudulent license, 
etc., void 



Fraudulent repre- 
sentations a misde- 
meanor 



Fals^ affidavit 
representation 
perjury 



Sec. 22. That it shall be unlawful for any person 
not legally licensed as a pharmacist to take, use or 
exhibit the title of pharmacist or licensed or registered 
pharmacist, or the title druggist or apothecary, or any 
other title, name or description of like import. 

Sec. 23. That any person, not being licensed as a 
pharmacist, who shall conduct or manage any drug 
store, pharmacy or other place of business for the com- 
pounding, dispensing or sale at retail of any drugs, 
medicines or poisons, or for the compounding of 
physicians' prescriptions contrary to the provisions 
of section four of this act, shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof 
shall be fined not less than twenty-five dollars nor more 
than one hundred dollars, and each week such drug 
store or pharmacy or other place of business is so un- 
lawfully conducted shall be held to constitute a sepa- 
rate and distinct offense. 

Sec. 24. That any person not being licensed as a 
pharmacist, who shall compound, dispense or sell at 
retail any drug, medicine, poison or pharmaceutical 
preparation, either upon a physician's prescription or 
otherwise, and any person being the owner or manager 
of a drug store, pharmacy or other place of business, 
who shall cause or permit any one not licensed as a 
pharmacist to dispense, sell at retail or compound any 
drug, medicine, poison or physician's prescription con- 
trary to the provisions of section four of this act, shall 
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon convic- 
tion thereof shall be fined not less than twenty-five dol- 
lars nor more than one hundred dollars. 

Sec. 25. That any license or permit or renewal 
thereof, obtained through fraud or by any fraudulent 
or false representations, shall be void and of no effect 
in law. Any person who shall make any fraudulent or 
false representations for the purpose of procuring a 
license or permit, or renewal thereof, either for himself 
or for another, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and 
upon conviction thereof shall be fined not less than 
twenty-five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars, 
and any person who shall wilfully make a false affi- 
davit or any other false or fraudulent representation 
for the purpose of procuring a license or permit, or re- 
newal thereof, either for himself or for another, shall 



North Carol am Pharmaceutical Association 



.'"l 



Penalty be deemed guilty of perjury, and upon conviction 

thereof shall be subject to like punishment as is now 
prescribed for the crime of perjury. 

Failure to expose Sec. 26. That any person being the holder of a li- 
liecnse or permit . . , . , . . , , . 

a misdemeanor cense or permit granted under the provisions of this 

act, who shall fail to expose such license or permit, or 
renewal thereof, in a conspicuous position in the place 
of business to which such permit or license relates, or 
in which the holder thereof is employed, contrary to the 
provisions of section eighteen of this act, shall be guilty 
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be 
fined not less than five dollars nor more than twenty- 
five dollars, and each day that such license, permit, or 
renewal thereof, shall not be exposed shall be held to 
constitute a separate and distinct offense. 



Penalty 



Each day sep 
a rate offense 



Carrying on busi 
ness after expira- 
tion a misde 



Penalty 



Selling poisons 
without label and 
record misde- 
meanor 



Penalty 



Misdemeanor for 
non-licentiate to 
take, use or ex- 
hibit title 



Penalty 



Conflicting laws 
repealed 



Sec. 2j. That any person being a holder of a license 
or permit granted under this act, who shall, after the 
expiration of such license or permit, and without re- 
newing the same, continue to carry on the business for 
which such license or permit was granted, contrary to 
the provisions of section eighteen of this act, shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof 
be fined not less than five dollars nor more than twen- 
ty-five dollars. 

Sec. 28. That any person who shall sell or deliver 
to any person any poisonous substance specified in sec- 
tion twenty of this act, without labeling the same and 
recording the delivery thereof in the manner prescribed 
in said section twenty, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor 
and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not less than 
twenty-five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars. 

Sec. 29. That any person, not being legally licensed 
as a pharmacist, who shall take, use or exhibit the title 
of pharmacist, licensed or registered pharmacist, drug- 
gist, apothecary or any other title, name or description 
of like import, contrary to the provisions of section 
twenty-two of this act, shall be guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not 
less than twenty-five dollars nor more than one hundred 
dollars. 

Sec. 30. That all laws and clauses of laws in con- 
flict with the provisions of this act are hereby re- 
pealed. 



202 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Associati 



on 



Sec. 31. That this act shall be in force from and 
after its ratification. 

In the General Assembly read three times, and rati- 
fied this 4th day of February, A. D. 1905. 



ANTI-NARCOTIC LAW 

An Act to Provide Against the Evils Resulting 
from the Traffic in Certain- Narcotic Drugs, and 
to Regulate the Sale Thereof. 



Sale of certain 
drugs forbidden ex- 
cepl upon prescrip 
tlon. 



What prescription 

to contain 



Prescriptions to he 
filed 



Not to Tie refilled 



No copy or dupli- 
cate to be fur- 
nished 



Original open to 
inspection 



Proviso: limita- 
tions 



The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section i. That it shall be unlawful for any person, 
firm or corporation to sell, furnish or give away any 
cocaine, alpha or beta eucaine, opium, morphine, heroin, 
or any salt or compound of any of the foregoing sub- 
stances, or any preparation or compound containing 
any of the following substances, or their salts or com- 
pounds, except upon the original written order or pre- 
scription of a lawfully authorized practitioner of medi- 
cine, dentistry, or veterinary medicine, which order 
or prescription shall be dated and shall contain the 
name of the person for whom prescribed, or, if ordered 
by a practitioner of veterinary medicine, shall state the 
kind of animal for which ordered, and shall be signed 
by the person giving the prescription or order. Such 
written order or prescription shall be permanently 
retained on file by the person, firm or corporation 
who shall compound or dispense the article ordered 
or prescribed, and it shall not be again compounded 
or dispensed, except upon the written order of the 
original prescriber for each and every subsequent com- 
pounding or dispensing. No copy or duplicate of such 
written order or prescription shall be made or de- 
livered to any person but the original shall at all times 
be opened to the inspection by the prescriber and prop- 
erly authorized officers of the law : Provided, however, 
That the above provisions shall not apply to prepara- 
tions containing not more than two grains of opium 
or not more than one-fourth grain of morphine, or not 
more than one-fourth grain of heroin, or not more 
than one-eighth grain of cocaine or not more than one- 
eighth grain of alpha or beta eucaine, in one fluid 
ounce, or, if a solid preparation, in one avoirdupois 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



203 



ounce : Provided, also, That the above provisions shall 
not apply to preparations containing opium and recom- 
mended and sold in good faith for diarrhoea and 
cholera, each bottle or package of which is accom- 
panied by specific directions for use, and a caution 
against habitual use; nor to powder of ipecac and 
opium, commonly known as "Dover's Powder;" nor to 
liniments nor ointments when plainly labeled "For ex- 
ternal use only:" And provided further, That the above 
provision shall not apply to sales at wholesale by job- 
bers, wholesalers and manufacturers, to retail drug- 
gists or qualified physicians, or to each other, nor to 
sales at retail by retail druggists to regular practition- 
ers of medicine, dentistry or veterinary medicine, nor 
to sales made to manufacturers of proprietary or phar- 
maceutical preparations for use in the manufacture of 
such preparations, nor to sales to hospitals, colleges, 
scientific or public institutions. 

Sec. 2. It shall be unlawful for any practitioner of 
medicine, dentistry or veterinary medicine to furnish 
to or prescribe for the use of any habitual user of 
the same any cocaine, heroin, alpha or beta eucaine, 
opium, morphine, or any salt or compound of any of 
the foregoing substances or any preparations contain- 
ing any of the foregoing substances or their salts or 
compounds. And it shall also be unlawful for any 
practitioner of dentistry to prescribe any of the fore- 
going substances for any person not under his treat- 
ment in the regular practice of his profession, or for 
any practitioner of veterinary medicine to prescribe 
any of the foregoing substances for the use of any 
human being: Provided, however, That the provisions 
of this section shall not be construed to prevent any 
lawfully authorized practitioner of medicine from fur- 
nishing or prescribing in good faith for the use of any 
habitual user of narcotic drugs who is under his pro- 
fessional care such substances as he may deem neces- 
sary for their treatment when such prescriptions are 
not given or substances furnished for the purpose of 
evading the provisions of this act. 



Proviso : further 
limitations 



Proviso : further 
limitations 



Prescriptions 
unlawful 



Proviso: limitation 



Note— The following words were stricken out of Section 1 
of this Act by the Legislature of 1909 : Vor to sales at retail 
by retail druggists to habitues personally knoicn as such to 
the -oilers. 



204 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 



Misdemeanor 



Judges to charge 
grand juries 



Board of pharmai 
to prosecute 



Sec. 3. Any person who shall violate any of the pro- 
visions of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and upon conviction shall be fined or im- 
prisoned in the discretion of the court;, and if a 
licensed pharmacist, physician, dentist, or veterinary 
surgeon, his license shall be revoked. It shall be the 
duty under this act of all Judges of the Superior 
Courts in this State, at every regular term thereof, 
to charge all regular impaneled grand juries to dili- 
gently inquire into and investigate all cases of the 
violations of the provisions of this act and to make 
a true presentment of all persons guilty of such viola- 
tions. It shall be the duty of the Board of Pharmacy 
to cause the prosecution of all persons violating the 
provisions of this act. No prosecution shall be brought 
for the sale of any patent or proprietary medicine con- 
taining any of the drugs or preparations hereinbefore 
mentioned until the Board of Pharmacy shall certify 
that such medicine contains any of the said drugs or 
preparations in excess of the maximum percentage 
hereinbefore mentioned. 

Sec. 4. In any proceedings under the provision of 
this act the charge may be brought against any or all 
of the members of a partnership, or against the direc- 
tors or executive officers of a corporation, or against 
the agent or employee of any person, partnership or 
corporation. 

Sec. 5. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with 
this act are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 6. This act shall be in force from and after its 
ratification. 

In the General Assembly read three times, and rati- 
fied this the 31st day of January, A. D. 1907. 



Note— -The following was stricken out of Section 3 of this 
Act by the Legislature of 1909: For the first offense shall be 
fined not less than twenty-five dollars nor more than fifty 
dollars, and upon conviction for a second offense shall be 
fined not less than fifty dollars nor more than one hundred 
dollars, and upon conviction for a third offense shall be fined 
not less than one hundred dollars nor more than two, and 
may be imprisoned in the county jail for not more than six 
months. 

The words printed in italics in said section were 
as an amendment in lieu of that stricken out. 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 205 

NEW COCAINE LAW 

An Act to Prohibit the Sale or Giving Away or 
Otherwise Dispensing Cocaine, Alpha or Beta 
eucaine, or any mixture of elther. 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section I. That no person shall sell, give away or Sale or gift with- 
otherwise dispense cocaine, alpha or beta eucaine, or any Misdemeanor 10n 
mixture of either or any salt or compound of any of 
the foregoing substances, or any preparation or com- 
pound containing any of the foregoing substances, or 
their salts or compounds, except on the prescription of 
a licensed physician, and any person violating the pro- 
visions of this section shall be deemed guilty of a mis- 
demeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined Punishment 
or imprisoned, or both fined and imprisoned, in the dis- 
cretion of the court: Provided, that nothing herein con- proviso : sales to 
tained shall be construed to prohibit the sale of cocaine J,\^ m m t Cists 0l " 
or alpha or beta eucaine, or any mixture of either, or 
any salt or compound of any of the foregoing sub- 
stances, or any preparation or compound containing any 
of the foregoing substances or tbeir salts or compounds, 
by any licensed manufacturing pharmacist or chemist or 

wholesale or retail druggist to other licensed manufac- Sal es for scientific, 
, . , , . , 1,1 , -i public or medicin- 

turing pharmacist or chemist, or wholesale or retail al uses 

pharmacist or druggist, or to hospitals, colleges, scien- 
tific or public institutions, or to licensed physicians, 
dentists or veterinary surgeons; nor to the use of co- 
caine or alpha or beta eucaine, or any mixture of either, 
or any salt or compound of any of the foregoing sub- 
stances, or any preparation or compound containing any 
of the foregoing substances or their salts or compounds 
by any licensed physicians, dentists or veterinary sur- 
geon in the regular course of his practice. 

Sec. 2. If any person, except a licensed physician, Possession of for- 
. . . . . , bidden drugs 

dentist or veterinary surgeon, manufacturing pharma- misdemeanor 

cist or chemist, or wholesale or retail pharmacist or 
druggist, have in his possession cocaine or alpha or beta 
eucaine, or any mixture of either, or any salt or com- 
pound of any of the foregoing substances, or any prep- 
aration or compound containing any of the foregoing- 
substances, or their salts or compounds (except when 
obtained in a bona fide manner upon the prescription of 
a licensed physician) he shall be guilty of a misde- punishment 



206 North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 

meanor and fined or imprisoned, or both, within the 

Proviso : posses- discretion of the court : Provided, that the possession of 

sion prima facie . . r 

evidence cocaine or alpha or beta eucame, or any mixture of 

either, or any salt or compound of any of the fore- 
going substances, or any preparation or compound con- 
taining any of the foregoing substances, or their salts 
or compounds, shall be prima facie evidence of violation 

„ . .. of this section: Provided, further, that nothing herein 

Proviso : hospit- , , & 

als, scientific and contained shall be construed to apply to any hospital, 

public institutions Qo]]Qgc Qr scientific ()] . public inst i tution . 

Requirements of Sec. 3. Every prescription for the use of cocaine or 

prescriptions - . . 

alpha or beta eucame, or any mixture of either, or any 

salt or compound of any of the foregoing substances, 

or any preparation or compound containing any of the 

foregoing substances, or their salts or compounds must 

be signed by the licensed physician giving the same, and 

the name and address of the patient must be plainly 

Refilling prescrip written upon the prescription, which prescription may be 

Violation of sec- ll ^ v '\ " nI - v once, and any person violating any of the 

tion misdemeanor provisions of this section shall be guilty of a misde- 

Punishment meanor, and upon conviction shall be lined or impris- 

in the discretion of the court. 

Affidavit for issue SEC. 4- That upon affidavit being made that there is 
ot summons , ,. , , ..... , . 

reason to believe that the provisions of this act are being 

violated at any place or by any person, those officers 
or persons authorized to issue process in cases provided 
in section three thousand seven hundred and twenty-one 
of The Revisal of one thousand nine hundred and live 
and the amendments thereof may, and are hereby au- 
thorized to, issue to any lawful officer of the city or 
county where such place or person may be a subpoena, 

Summons to capias ad testificandum or summons in writing, corn- 

appear and give . 

evidence manding any person who may have information con- 

cerning such violation of law to appear and give evi- 
dence upon oath concerning the same. 

No person excused g,.- c . 5. That no person shall be excused from testi- 

froni giving evi- ~ . 

dence lying on any prosecution tor violating this act or at 

any investigation concerning the violation of any law 

prohibiting the sale, dispensing or possession of any of 

the substances, mixtures or compounds enumerated in 

this act, or any other law of the State concerning the 

same, but no discovery made by such person shall be 

Witnesses ^ use ^ against him in any penal or criminal prosecution, 



North Carolina Pharmaceutical Association 20' 

and he shall be altogether pardoned for the offense done 
or participated in by him. 

Sec. 6. If any credible witness shall prove upon Affidavit for 
oath, before any person authorized to issue process in 
cases provided in section three thousand seven hundred 
and twenty-one of The Revisal of one thousand nine 
hundred and live and the amendments thereof, that 
there is reasonable cause to suspect that any provision 
of this act is being violated or any other act prohibiting 
the sale, dispensing or possession of the substances, mix- 
tures or compounds enumerated herein, it shall be law- 
ful for such officer or person to grant a warrant, to be Issue of search 
executed within the limits of the county in which such warrant 
violation is alleged to have occured, or be occuring, to 
any proper officer authorizing him to search the place 
where or the person by whom it is alleged (in such 
affidavit) such act has been or is being violated, and to 
seize and preserve any evidence of the violation of this Seizure and pre- 
set, to be used in the trial of any person arrested by dence** 011 ° f 
reason of the examination, search or seizure herein 
provided. All cocaine, alpha or beta eucaine, or any 
mixture of either, or any salt or compound of any of 
the foregoing substances or any preparation or com- 
pound containing any of the foregoing substances, or 
their salts or compounds, seized under this act, shall be 
held, and upon acquittal of the person so charged shall return C of° drugs 
be returned to him, and upon conviction shall be de- 
stroyed. 

Sec. 7. This act shall be in force and effect from 
and after its ratification. 

In the General Assembly read three times and ratified 
this the 8th day of March, 1913. 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Advertisements .*.... 210 

Announcements 28 

Addresses 1 :i 

Amendments to Pharmacy Law L91 

Anti-Narcotic Law 102 

Associate Members 139 

By-Laws N. C. Board of Pharmacy 156 

Committees 3 

Communications 28, 40, 54 

Deceased Members 139 

Delegates 4 

Honorary Members 138 

List of Registered Pharmacists 163 

List of Registered Physicians 188 

Members elected at Annual Meeting 65 

Members and visitors in attendance at Annual Meeting 141 

Minutes 11 

Necrology 190 

New Members 137 

North ( larolina Board of Pharmacy 146 

Officers 3 

Papers L13 

Past Officers 6 

Prefatory Notes 

President's Annual Address 4:! 

Report of Treasurer 95 

Report of Secretary 47 

Report of Auditing ( iommittee 107 

Report of Committee on President's Address L03 

Report of Legislative ( lommittee 79 

Report of ( Jommittee on Membership Increase 49 

Report of Committee on Adulteration 96 

Report of Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of 

Pharmacy ! d , 

Roll of Members 129 

14 



210 ADVERTISEMENTS 



DR. MILES' 

NERVINE 

HEART REMEDY 

ANTI-PAIN PILLS 

Nerve and Liver Tablets 

LAXATIVE TABLETS 

Are Standard Household Remedies, PRICE PROTECTED. 

SOLD UNDER OUR GUARANTEE OF BENEFIT 
OR RETAIL PURCHASE PRICE REFUNDED TO THE 
DEALER WITHOUT RED TAPE. 

DR. MILES' REMEDIES SHOULD INTEREST 
EVERY LIVE DRUGGIST BECAUSE THE PROFIT AND 
THE DEMAND ARE STEADY. 

DR. MILES MEDICAL CO., Elkhart, Ind. 



H. Gamse & Bro. 

THE HOUSE OF QUALITY AND SERVICE 
LITHOGRAPHERS AND PRINTERS TO THE DRUG TRADE 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



GGHST'S LABELS 
aumd F@wd®r BOXES 
CARTOMS, ETC. 



Expert Workmanship, Quality, Prompt Service 

COMPLETE PLANT— EXPERT ATTENTION 
PROMPT DELIVERY 






'MH